A Nissan worker checks radiation levels

In the wake of the 2011 tsunami that caused a meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, there was a fear that radioactive cars and trucks could be bound for export. Within days of the tragedy, Nissan was already testing its vehicles' radiation levels (pictured above), and the rest of the Japanese auto industry followed soon after. However, three years after the natural disaster, it appears that some used models are still making it out and winding up on the roads in Central Asia.

Next time you take a drive in Kyrgyzstan, you might want to have a Geiger counter handy. An impound lot in the capital city of Bishkek has already amassed a collection of 70 irradiated cars, according to Autoweek. The radioactive vehicles are making into the country through dealers that purchase used models from Japan. They are then driven over the border from neighboring nations to make radiation checks less likely.

It's hardly an isolated problem for Kyrgyzstan. According to Autoweek, the Russian port at Vladivostok turned away 132 irradiated Japanese vehicles as recently as January 2014. In some cases, Japan is willing to take the models back, but Bishkek is stuck with its 70 contaminated cars to find a way of dispose of them.