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In the charged atmosphere at day two of RM's Monterey auctions, a record-setting sum of money changed hands in exchange for one of the most exclusive Ferraris of all time. The 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 NART Spider blew away expectations last night, selling for a gavel price of $25 million and a total bill (after RM's 10-percent fee) of $27.5 million. Even in a room filled to bursting with collectors ready to spend millions on rolling sculpture, the sale price caused a major hubbub.

Bidding on the NART Spider, estimated before the auction to top out somewhere between $14M and $17M, started at $10M and was immediately raised with a whopping $16M second bid. The room seemed to hum as the price continued to rise, especially once the twenty-million-dollar mark had been crested.

While any Ferrari 275 GTB is likely to be an auction darling, the 1967 NART car had every factor in place to make it a true whale. Only ten of these North American Racing Team cars was ever built; the Spider appeared in 1968's The Thomas Crown Affair with that movie's star, Steve McQueen numbered amongst the first NART owners (he crashed his); this specific car has had only one owner from new; and finally, the long-standing owner of the car announced that all of the proceeds from the auction would be given to charity. Clearly, the night had a lot of winners.

The actual winner, as reported by Bloomberg, was Lawrence Stroll, a Canadian entrepreneur who helped develop the ultra successful Tommy Hilfiger clothing brand in the 1990s. The $27.5 million that Stroll laid out represents a record-high for a car sold at auction in the US and the second-best tally for any car at auction, just trailing the $29.7M paid for a 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 driven by Juan Manuel Fangio.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 15 Comments
      bleexeo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Seems like a lot. All the money going to charity probably got the price to go higher than usual.
      Jonathan Smith
      • 1 Year Ago
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaZB14xiHg8
      Michael Clifton
      • 1 Year Ago
      Beautiful car with a great history, only wish I could've afforded it.
      ferps
      • 1 Year Ago
      this is what happens when a small portion of the population has nearly all the wealth and some of them want to buy the same thing.
        Daltini
        • 1 Year Ago
        @ferps
        Well, you can't afford these things living off welfare to say the least...
      BustedProf
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's not enough money.
      Jaybird248
      • 1 Year Ago
      I can understand big money for a Fangio-driven MB race car. There's only one of those. I can't understand it for a street car, no matter what its pedigree.
      WASSSUPPP
      • 1 Year Ago
      I work for Petrolicious and we did a video for this car before it went to auction. A really amazing story. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaZB14xiHg8
      Lisa Marie Cross
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wishing my name was Lisa Marie Stoll right about now.
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