BMW still hasn't released official fuel economy numbers for its diesel-powered 2014 328d, but now, those mileage ratings have been posted on the EPA's FuelEconomy.gov website. As expected, the 328d is quite an efficient little machine, with the rear-wheel-drive sedan good for 32 miles per gallon in the city and 45 mpg highway. That even bests the 30/42 mpg of the smaller Volkswagen Jetta TDI.

The last time BMW offered a diesel 3 Series in our market, it was the six-cylinder 335d, which – while mighty quick and excellent to drive – was only offered as a rear-wheel-drive sedan and was rated at 23 mpg city and 36 mpg highway. For 2014, BMW will offer the 328d with optional xDrive all-wheel drive, though that reduces the fuel economy numbers to 31/43 mpg. Beyond that, the BMW will even sell you a 328d xDrive wagon, which nets the same 31/43 mpg rating, according to FuelEconomy.gov.

Look for the 2014 BMW 328d to hit dealerships this fall, and when it launches, it will be the only diesel offering in its class (until the next Mercedes-Benz C-Class arrives, anyway). Lexus and Infiniti will offer hybrid versions of the IS and Q50, respectively, but we've always had a taste for torque, and the 328d's 2.0-liter engine with 180 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of twist shouldn't disappoint.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 163 Comments
      Joe Liebig
      • 1 Year Ago
      Great, finally some movement on the diesel front. Let's see if Merc brings the 250CDI from it's GLK into the new C. And Audi should bring the popular TDI back, too. That'd be a nice set to choose from. Right now, the BMW seems like the best pick in that class.
      futuramautoblog
      • 1 Year Ago
      While the excellent MPG is certainly a charm, I wonder if I'd choose the diesel over less expensive, yet more powerful 328i. Decisions, decisions... hmmmm..
      dea5787
      • 1 Year Ago
      I debated between this and my 335i that I ended up getting. I knew the slower accerlation would get old after a while. If only they would have made a 335d in the F30 generation....
      Dan
      • 1 Year Ago
      Ohhh, I could definitely see trading in my Jetta TDI SportWagen for this. AWD and better MPG? I'm sure the price tag is going to make me cry.
      taser it
      • 1 Year Ago
      An 8 speed transmission will do that for it.
      TrueDat
      • 1 Year Ago
      "That even bests the 30/42 mpg of the smaller Volkswagen Jetta TDI." the 3 series and Jetta are the same size... poor journalism aside, these numbers are very impressive. any word on MSRP?
      skierpage
      • 1 Year Ago
      Subaru lost their highest mpg AWD wagon crown, that was short-lived. Subaru Impreza AWD Wagon 2.0L 30 mpg Combined / 27 City / 36 Highway BMW 328d xDrive Diesel 35 mpg Combined / 31 City / 43 Highway Even the upcoming XV Crosstrek hybrid only gets 28 City /34 Highway. This BMW is a mild hybrid with stop-start and brake energy regen, but probably can't move at 20mph electric-only as the Subaru can. BMW gets much better mpg with much more power, 180 horsepower and 280 lb-ft torque vs. Subaru's 148 horsepower and 145 lb-ft of torque. You get what you pay for, as it starts at $42,345, probably $15,000 more than an Impreza. And when you add on cold-weather package and leather seats that Subaru also now offers on the Impreza line, it's almost twice the price.
      Scooter
      • 1 Year Ago
      52.9 mpg in my Honda CR-Z on a road trip to Austin, Texas, beat that! Proof: http://www.flickr.com/photos/99633235@N03/9409290802/
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        [blocked]
        graphikzking
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        Umm.. my daily driving in my prius for work I get 53.5 mpg. That's a 5 seater with a trunk full of work gear and a car seat base in the back. Why wouldn't someone buy a SMALLER car that gets less mileage? BTW - I THINK THIS IS MY NEXT CAR! I'M REALLY HOPING THEY OFFER AN AWD OPTION THIS TIME!!!
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @graphikzking
          "Why wouldn't someone buy a SMALLER car that gets less mileage?" Capital outlay being the obvious answer, and if you park in the street in a large city, that's a second reason.
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @graphikzking
          ""Why wouldn't someone buy a SMALLER car that gets less mileage?" Capital outlay being the obvious answer, and if you park in the street in a large city, that's a second reason." Says the guy who DID buy a smaller car that gets less mileage...
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @graphikzking
          "Says the guy who DID buy a smaller car that gets less mileage..." I'm an accountant. I wanted a proven reliable vehicle that was inexpensive to buy, interesting to own, gets decent fuel economy and is easy to park, for commuting purposes all as efficiently as possible. I average 39mpg (US) in my iQ on a mixture of 70mph hilly motorway terrain, and 40mpg flatter back roads. In winter months, that figure drops to an average of 36mpg (US). I drive 57 miles each way to and from the office. Compared with a Prius C, which in base form costs $4K more but with less standard equipment and which should average 53mpg in the summer on the same route, I'm effectively paying $14 per week more in fuel. With 47 working weeks per annum, that equates to $3.3K over the five year stewardship of the vehicle. So I'm still quids in. My comments were in defence of the fact that buying diesels and hybrids may not be fiscally sensible when the larger picture is considered. I appreciate that you may well not have two ounces of common sense - you're American, after all - but for my purposes, the purchase of even a cheaper hybrid vehicle is not economically viable.
        acurasucks
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Scooter
        It's still a POS honduh!
      mikeybyte1
      • 1 Year Ago
      32/45 is pretty impressive. This is a great option for those who really want a BMW along with great mileage.
        Snark
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikeybyte1
        And yet it'll still be more expensive to run than "less efficient" options.
          aatbloke1967
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Snark
          Snark, considering you reside so often in parts of Europe, your disparaging comments concerning this diesel 3-series come as somewhat of a surprise. After all, I'm sure you're discounting stronger residuals for a kick-off.
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Snark
          Which 3-series will be less expensive to operate? All of the turbo gas models are just or more likely to have a fuel pump failure/carbon buildup. Urea costs like $12 at Walmart for ~10k miles worth. The "extra" maintenance cost associated with diesel (DPF filter, more oil, fuel filter, etc) amounts to roughly a penny per mile, which doesn't come close to negating the fact that you are paying ~30% less for fuel.
        Matt
        • 1 Year Ago
        @mikeybyte1
        And it'll achieve 32/45 no sweat. Modern diesels tend to get closer to their EPA highway rating in COMBINED driving.
      Svartorn
      • 1 Year Ago
      I want a 328d m-sport wagon with a 6 speed sooooooooooo bad. But I can't. Because 'merica.
        Rotation
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Svartorn
        More like because 'varia. No one told BMW they can't offer it. They don't want to offer it.
          Zoom
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          I blame BMW. They have the 5GT for sale, and arguable a 3er wagon in a stick would sell more than the 5GT. Or some of the other low volume models BMW sells here like the Mini Paceman.
          Joe Liebig
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          US regulations keep them from offering it. Do you have any idea how complicated it is? It takes ages!
          ksrcm
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Rotation
          @ Rotation The only reason BMW doesn't WANT to offer it (this far you are correct) is because BMW doesn't WANT to pay extortion vig to local mobsters. And the only reason BMW doesn't want to do this is because it thinks it cannot sell enough RWD+diesel+MT vehicles to offset the vig. This is how local mobsters screw minorities and can't care less because they are elected by majority.
        Kris Snow
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Svartorn
        I wants it as well.
      Snark
      • 1 Year Ago
      Torque, torque, torque. Whatever. I'm not towing a boat. Torque is vastly overrated by German car fanboys who think they're supposed to adore diesels and don't understand the relationship between horsepower and torque. And for a sporting driving experience, give me a quick-revving, higher-horsepower gasser ANY day of the week. Torque is fine, but how it's delivered makes more of a difference in the driving experience...and I don't want a big lump of torque down low.
        Joe Liebig
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Snark
        The reality is that 95% of people drive slow as f***. It doesn't matter anyway. It's like giving gourmet food to pets.
        aatbloke1967
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Snark
        Yet again Snark, you don't represent the entire car-buying populace.
        brucec039
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Snark
        Different strokes for different folks. But imagine if diesels were widespread here. Costs would be lower due to high production volumes, and diesel fuel would cost no more than regular. Fuel economy would be up 1/3 and fuel costs would stay lower as a result. Your car would be a highly desireable long lasting diesel with 100K miles on it 7 years later rather than a hot potato with battery replacement and tech obsolescence issues a hybrid would have.
        k_m94
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Snark
        A big lump of torque down low is exactly what would make a car feel quick and give you that shove in the seats feeling to be quicker and more fun on real roads. If you're not flooring it for very long, that immediate torque with no need to downshift would allow for better overtaking and thrills than having to wait for the higher rpm torque that gives you the power numbers.
          The Wasp
          • 1 Year Ago
          @k_m94
          The diesel fanbois need to come up with a universal performance measurement to show how diesel actually provides this mystical 'shove in the seats'. The widely used 0-60 measurement does not really back this up. Torque is great and it does matter. But if the car has great torque and mediocre acceleration, then can we also hold diesel accountable for that? (VW GTD, I'm looking at you.)
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
    • Load More Comments