Polaris Industries, the company that until recently was probably best known for its ATVs and snowmobiles, bought Indian Motorcycle in 2011. With that purchase it plans to challenge Harley-Davidson for the emotions, and the Benjamins, of the classic American motorcycle rider. The Thunder Stroke 111 is the engine that will power the revival, and to celebrate the new V-Twin the company produced a tribute to what may be Indian's most famous bike, The World's Fastest Indian.

That was the name of the movie and the real-life episode that saw New Zealander Burt Munro break the land-speed record for under-1,000-cc bikes on the Bonneville Salt Flats on a 1920 Indian Scout streamliner.

The tribute to the man and the bike is called "The Spirit of Munro," a custom streamliner built to house the Thunder Stroke 111 and ridden by Todd Eagan across a California dry lake bed. It was built by Jeb Scolman of Jeb's Metal & Speed in Long Beach, California, and as you can see in the two short films below, both the engine and the bike are rather cool.





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  • 29 Comments
      protovici
      • 1 Year Ago
      I HIGHLY recommend watching the movie!!
        4gasem
        • 1 Year Ago
        @protovici
        It's on Netflix if anyone cares!
        IOMTT
        • 1 Year Ago
        @protovici
        Completely agree! Loved the movie and well worth the time.
      GasMan
      • 1 Year Ago
      Seeing him cast his own pistons out of melted down Coke cans is EPIC.
      Tom
      • 1 Year Ago
      Truly a great and fantastic story and movie.
      IOMTT
      • 1 Year Ago
      Polaris is doing something different than each of the previous attempts to resurrect Indian. They have a clean sheet of paper and are not using some of the shelf frames, and S&S mills which looks like those in an HD. The new ThunderStroke engine looks great and is definitely inspired by the original Indian aesthetics. The power sounds like it will be right there also. Even though I am not a cruiser customer, I am very interested to see the final product.
      Brodz
      • 1 Year Ago
      I wish Polaris all the best in bringing back a legend.
      gdmn2find
      • 1 Year Ago
      Indian motorcycles were the only real competitor to Harley back in the day. Harley somehow got the big military contracts before during and after WW 2. Indian went out of business even though their bikes were somewhat similar in many ways to Harley. What attracted many were the big fenders and front fender ornament of the Indian head/light. Indian has been resurrected and died multiple times. I hope they succeed this time. As some have mentioned already, the cost per unit will have a great effect on sales. Poor service will also end any possible resurrection of this motorcycle. All I can say is good luck to this Phoenix like renewal of another American motorcycle company.
      Frank S. Pedigo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Yes they do have a new motor but you can bet they will have a huge price tag . Now if they made an affordable bike that would be something impressive .
      AngeloD
      • 1 Year Ago
      Challenge Harley-Davidson? They might now that their pricing is a little more in line with reality, $19K for a Chief. They were over $30K when the previous owners held the company.
      JERRY GREVAS
      • 1 Year Ago
      Why would I want to go 100mph on a cycle?
      vi_per
      • 1 Year Ago
      looks like a football?
      vi_per
      • 1 Year Ago
      Looks like a flying football.
      Jim
      • 1 Year Ago
      Should be NO PROBLEM dethroning Harley. There's one critical area where I warn EVERYONE, Service after the sale. I just got off the phone with a local dealership, after contacting Harley in Wisconsin. THe Wisconsin guy told me that would contact the local shop and direct them on how to solve the problem beginning with a test drive. That was TEN MONTHS ago. I called this morning, they haven't had time to get to it. DO NOT do this to yourself. I'm now 23 thousand bucks into a piece of crap that they've been trying to fix for 8 years.
        bandicoot5
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jim
        I have not had any of those problems with any of mine, that a change of tech or dealership didn't fix. Techs too young, can't fix the older bikes. They don't know the tricks. Techs TOO old, don't give a crap any more. Get a tech with a few miles on him. It also helps to know what they ride. (Interview your tech. Schedule your work with THAT tech.) They often know that family (Road King, Dyna, Sportster, etc.) best. My "newest" bike is a 2000. They all run well and have not cost me an arm and leg to maintain. Mostly consumables, like tires and brakes, and fluid changes. All were bought used, from dealerships.
        chzyrider
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jim
        I have a '98 1200 Sportster Sport (XLS) and '01 Dyna SuperGlide Sport (FXDX). Both have been very dependable without any mechanical repairs needed. The Dyna rides like the Sportster on steroids, great for longer trips, yet still very nimble in the twisty mountain roads with that extra size and power for easily carrying a passenger, while the Sportster is great for local jaunts and scraping the pegs in 'Thundercross' races on tight closed courses held at past local H.O.G. rallies. However, I know several other riders that have had some issues with their modern Harley. But I can also point out how they ride it as the most likely reasons for the mechanical failures due to operator errors such as; over-slipping the clutch taking off from a stop, or over-revving the engine rpm before shifting, or excessively hard stomping on the shift lever when only a slight press of the foot is necessary. Taking care to ride and operate the machine properly will allow them last several years without major service. Like any machine, maintenance is crucial in changing fluids regularly as recommended and monitoring the wearable parts like brakes and cables. I truly expect my Harleys will last many more years before any major service is needed. Beyond the initially short factory warranty, I would always do my own work so I don't have to worry about or rely on the quality of mechanic hired at my local dealership. For those that cannot do the work themselves, there are numerous independent shops that can care for your bike at reasonable prices.
        Frank S. Pedigo
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Jim
        You will find that the biggest problem is most shops have done away with the split for mechanics . It use to be a 60-40 or 505-50 split and you could make a good living . But now all the dealers want to do is increase thier bottom line on the backs of thier employees . The dealer in my town is paying thier help $10 an hour for certified mechanics and cant find any good help . So they blame the worker who only asks a fair wage . The biggest shame is how people will take the businesses side . Who do they think is raiseing the prices ? It sure isn`t the workers who wages have been slashed .
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