We often throw the word "awesome" around when talking about certain electric vehicles with extraordinary capabilities. In the case of the EV1 desert race buggy from Strategic Recovery Institute (SRI) however, the descriptor seems somewhat inadequate. Fabricated by Strategic Racing Designs (SRD) using a Pikes Peak-proven drivetrain from EV West, this thing knocks your everyday "awesome" to the ground with a Chuck Norris reverse roundhouse kick, then chews it up beneath its BF Goodrich Baja T/A KR tires, kicking up a pair of rowdy rooster tails sparkling with tiny bits of awesome in the process. Seriously.

Created with the intention of competing in the SCORE Baja 1000, this beast of a machine carries a pair of swappable 41-kWh battery packs. Each of those sends power to its own Warp 9 DC motor via a dedicated Soliton 1 controller. The parallel power systems allows for mission-critical forward motion if a component happens to fail in flight.

The 400 kW (535 horsepower) from the twin motors is channeled through a four-speed sequential transmission causing mini sand storms to spontaneously erupt whenever the electrons are unleashed. Top speed is said to be 125 miles per hour and it should be able crush its competitors for about 100 miles before needing fresh packs.

While its racing aspirations have not yet been realized, the team is continuing to test and further refine the EV1 with hopes of competing in the NOORA Mexican 1000 this April. You don't have to wait until then to see it in action, however; just scroll on down to watch it play in the giant sand box that is the Ocotillo Wells State Vehicular Recreation Area. You can also see lots of pics and follow their progress on the SRI Facebook page.



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  • 12 Comments
      2 wheeled menace
      • 7 Months Ago
      Domenick, i love your writing. Keep up the good work my man.
      Giza Plateau
      • 7 Months Ago
      One question, how are they paying for all this?
        Neil Blanchard
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        With money?
        Joeviocoe
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        trying to find your 'hard earned tax dollars' in there somewhere?
          Giza Plateau
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          No, I'm always curious how people manage substantial EV projects. Knowledge is potent.
        Ryan
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Giza Plateau
        Why does that matter? How do all of the other race trucks in the Baja 1000 get built?
      • 7 Months Ago
      Slap some paddles on that baby and bring it out to Glamis.
      BipDBo
      • 7 Months Ago
      "Top speed is said to be 125 miles per hour and it should be able crush its competitors for about 100 miles before needing fresh packs." I'm sure that it can go 100 miles while highway cruising, but not while racing in the sand.
      Erica Boulder-Wanker
      • 7 Months Ago
      Giza...visit the SRI website and read... it is a non-profit, thus on the continued hunt for funding and donations... SRI would do itself a favor to have someone with professional skills proofread the website... Numerous misspelled words. This is a knock on credibility. Also, check out the Board of Directors... a real mixed bag... Not your typical batch of proven corporate executives.... More power to 'em.
        Giza Plateau
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Erica Boulder-Wanker
        I did. It's an organization to support recovering addicts. How that translates to an electric Baja racer is a bit of a mystery as well.
      Marco Polo
      • 7 Months Ago
      Great fun ! Not only do vehicles like this raise the image of EV powered vehicles, but get the message out to the sort of people who are Fox viewers, in a way that they can appreciate the awesome potential of EV transport. I haven't heard of the Strategic Recovery Institute, prior to reading this article, but judging by their website, they seems a very worthwhile cause, with an interesting approach to social problems. I'm not sure whether Giza is just being his usual negative self or not, but the fact that the US has over 114, 000 former veterans homeless, (and many addicts) should be a considered a matter for national shame! If SRI is able to reduce this number, in such a cool way, then Jeffery W Smith and his team, qualify (at least in my opinion) as hero's !