The numbers are in, and they're looking good. According to the EPA, the Tesla Model S gets a miles per gallon equivalent (MPGe) rating of 89 (combined), 88 (city) and 90 (highway). MPGe is defined as the distance a vehicle would travel on the energy contained in one gallon of gasoline, though of course the Model S runs on electrons, not gas.

To compare, other pure electric cars on the market include the Honda Fit at 118 combined MPGe, the Mitsubishi i with 112 MPGe, the Ford Focus Electric with 105 MPGe and the Nissan Leaf with "just" 99 MPGe. Even at the bottom of this particular list, these are impressive numbers for the Model S, meaning it makes efficient use of the energy available in its battery.

Tesla says the range has been declared to be 265 miles using the EPA's five-cycle testing procedure, which makes it the long-range mileage champ of the production electric car world. Using the EPA's older two-cycle testing protocol, the Model S would score more than 300 miles per charge – significantly greater than the 244 miles managed by the older Tesla Roadster. Still, that range figure only applies to the top-of-the-line version with the 85-kWh battery that starts at $69,900. There will be Model S sedans available with considerably less range and a smaller price tag, as well as a Performance model starting at $84,900.

We're on the lookout for more information from Tesla, and we expect it'll come before the first deliveries take place this Friday at the company's Fremont factory in California.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 80 Comments
      Keldon
      • 2 Years Ago
      Wow, that is the best-looking sports sedan i've seen in a loooong time! Congrats Tesla!
      kcroc10077
      • 2 Years Ago
      Acura take note--this is a good looking design from a neophyte company. Why can't you design something that looks desirable?? Kudos to Tesla.As technology advances electric cars will make sense for a greater range of people.
        suthrn2nr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kcroc10077
        lol, i love acura, but your comment is falling on def ears. I wish their management would wake up.
      jakesteed4u
      • 2 Years Ago
      You got to start somewhere. You can't wait till oil runs dry or gas is at $10 a gallon to switch over to electric. Why so much hate towards electric cars when they do wean us off of foreign oil?
        raughle1
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jakesteed4u
        Haterz gonna hate.
        Synthono
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jakesteed4u
        If something exists, someone on the internet hates it.
        Hazdaz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jakesteed4u
        Why so much hate? Because people are easily manipulated and they fall for nonsense spewed out by media outlets like FAUXNews who use any and all issues to divide us as a nation. They will vilify anything for their own political gains. Never mind the fact that, like you mentioned, electrics can help ween us off foreign oil and help keep literally BILLIONS of dollars right here at home. Also its easier to hate on electric cars, than deal with real, bigger-picture issues like the eventual drying up of oil reserves... one of those can be wrapped up in a simple 5-second sound bite, while the other actually takes time and effort to fix. In our short-sighted, flash-in-the-pan society, which one do you really think simple-minded folks are going to pick?
        Sir Duke
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jakesteed4u
        Only the jackasses hate on electric cars. While I don't all electric cars made, there are plenty of gas/diesel cars that I also loathe.
        Drakkon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @jakesteed4u
        Because the electric car lobby doesn't pay the bills of half of Congress.
      kmrk
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sold. Incredible progress against the odds. It may not be the overall end state for the auto industry but accolades for pioneering business acumen and drive.
        Nowuries
        • 2 Years Ago
        @kmrk
        Lets see how it performs first... The Fisker looked great too, but has been plagued with a horde of gremlins. I wish them well though!
          wtrmlnjuc
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Nowuries
          They've been testing this for longer than the Fisker has been produced. I'll bet it's more reliable. Also, the Fisker is an extended range hybrid, not a full electric car like the Tesla shown here. It has the problems of both an IC car and an electric vehicle all in one package. If not designed with both in mind, it will ultimately lead to failure or somewhat of a failure. So all in all, it's a Volt, except sexier.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      dmojavensis
      • 2 Years Ago
      Taking into account that the efficiency of modern gasoline cars is about 20% 90MPGe on a highway, being equivalent of just 18MPG (gasoline), is not that impressive.
        suthrn2nr
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dmojavensis
        do you work for an oil company PR department? What you said makes electric cars even more impressive compared to gasoline cars, because internal combustion engines, as fun as they are, are very inefficient at only 25% - 35% efficiency. Meaning 65%-75% of energy realeased is wasted by gasoline ICE engines. Electric engines waste far less energy, but somehow that is still not good enough?
        Hazdaz
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dmojavensis
        Modern gasoline cars are closer to 30-35% efficient, and electricity production and transmission is in the 90% realm.
        masteraq
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dmojavensis
        That makes no sense.
        dmojavensis
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dmojavensis
        A typo: add a comma after "20%".
        kmrk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @dmojavensis
        One step forward....
      ken
      • 2 Years Ago
      I still don't think electric car is a good idea yet. Not now. Not until people can refill the car within 15 min or oil really ran dry.
        Sir Duke
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ken
        Ken: The very first plane built by the Wright brothers was the SR-71 Blackbird. I really don't get people like you. Got to crawl before you walk or run. Oh, for your sake, I hope we run out of oil first.
        Thomas Fisher
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ken
        The Model S can "refill" in about ~40 minutes at a charging station, and in about 2 minutes when they get the battery swapping service up and running (the car is already set up for it). While 40minutes > 15minutes, 99% of the actual "refills" on the Model S will likely occur at home while plugged into your home charger where time is not an issue (since you will be asleep, and the car only takes 4 hours to charge at home). So for every 100 times you go to the gas station and spend 15 minutes of your life filling up your car, you will go to a dedicated charging station ONCE with an extended range Tesla to spend 40 minutes. That's 1,500 minutes of "fill" time vs 40 minutes for the Tesla under real life conditions, in terms of time that would otherwise normally be productively used. Ok, ok, those numbers are complete fiction in the sense that I don't actually know how many times you will need to go to a charging station vs charging at your home. But the ONLY time you need to do that is when you travel more than 260 miles in a day with no natural opportunities to let the car charge (like while you are in the office for instance). Something like 80% of Americans drive less than 40 miles per day, let alone 260 miles so a 99% number doesn't seem off base for me and certainly is not in my own personal situation. Realistically the only time the vast majority of people would use the fast charging stations are on long trips, and most people might enjoy taking a 40 minute break every 4 hours on a long road trip.
          Drakkon
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Thomas Fisher
          Or just stop at Costco and get 800 D-cell batteries.
        Synthono
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ken
        Early days. Personally, I agree that we're a couple major battery advances away from an electric that makes sense for the majority. But that doesn't mean they won't work for the minority, and progress requires development. These cars will lead to the electric cars that are viable for everyone.
        masteraq
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ken
        It's a tradeoff. A gasoline car can be refueled in 5 minutes, while an electric car needs a few hours. On the other hand, the electric car can be recharged at home at night, rather than having to go to a gas station. Plus electricity is much cheaper than gas (per mile).
          suthrn2nr
          • 2 Years Ago
          @masteraq
          FYI, people dont like tradeoffs. Until they are knee deep in their own sh*t, most people are not willing to make sacrifices to prevent a major problem which hasn't happened yet. It's like in New Orleans, the aging levees were not addressed until after they broke and the city flooded, but no one wanted to make the sacrifice (i.e. pay more taxes) to fix them. Same for global warming (i'm not debating wether its real or not), i have read a lot of comments from people saying they will be "greener" when/if global warming "happens." But if it does happen, at that point it is too late, but people are not willing to make the sacrifice now to prevent a possible problem.
        Peter
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ken
        The bakery called. Because you are stupid as bread.
        Drakkon
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ken
        it all depends on who you are and how you drive.
        kmrk
        • 2 Years Ago
        @ken
        Fair point but the same was said for the first automobiles. No infrastructure. History shows it will follow.
      MONTEGOD7SS
      • 2 Years Ago
      It takes a lot of failures to finally get something right sometimes. It looks like Tesla is heading in the right direction, and if gas prices stay high they will have the continued backing to further develop the technology. No one alternative energy or transportation can save us, but a combined effort from many sides in many different ways can reduce our need for fossil fuels. As it sits right now I would buy a Volt, because I love the way the driveline works, and being a gasoline hybrid it has an infinite range.
      • 2 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        suthrn2nr
        • 2 Years Ago
        they are busy finding any possible flaw with this and the amount of progess Tesla is making.
        veernok
        • 2 Years Ago
        Personally I have nothing against EVs, and indeed they are a good alternative for the future of transportation. (where is hydrogen development these days?) What I find troubling is that some people don't realize that with the current technology EVs just aren't a GREAT solution in all cases. $70,000 isn't cheap. That's a Chevy Cruze Eco with about another $50,000 to spend on fuel. Then there is the issue of "displacement". Where does the electricity come from? How is it produced? So while you yourself may no longer burn fossil fuels, maybe somewhere else more fossil fuels are burned so you can have more electricity. Furthermore, can our aging and ailing electric grid support an increase that would be created by a mass move to EVs? Most of these questions will have location specific answers. Some states have better infrastructure or cleaner power generation than others. Lastly, and this is probably my biggest concern, how clean is it to produce an EV? One cannot truly call a vehicle environmentally friendly when its production requires the use of highly toxic materials or chemicals to achieve a "clean" end result. Lithium is no laughing matter. To begin with most lithium reserves are found outside of the US, which means a foreign dependency on the metal. Secondarily, the mining and refinement process are often severely detrimental to the environment. Granted, its the best we have at the moment so we make the best of a bad situation. All I am saying is that before everyone blindly rushes into the "EV is the best" boat, I think they need to do some personal research and learn about the true impacts of electric driving on a global scale from raw materials to completed product; not just consider how much you will save because you no longer need to buy gas. (will you really save anything over the lifespan of the car considering the cost of entry?) Displacing pollution and destruction of the environment to some far off corner where you don't see it, isn't going to solve anything in the long run. I guess what I am trying to say is that it is most important to be well informed and make your decisions then. The truth is neither ICE nor EV (at its current level) are the true solution to the problem, but progress on both fronts is absolutely better than doing nothing.
          Lemon
          • 2 Years Ago
          @veernok
          I did a research project back in college on alternative fuel technologies, and based on the emissions of coal-fired power plants the "well-to-wheels" emissions for a BEV is still SIGNIFICANTLY less than that of a gas-electric hybrid (I used a 2008 Prius for comparison). I think the emission levels were somewhere around 25% compared to the Prius. That considers all processes from generating/refining to charging/refueling to final use in the car. Also, the cost of driving was very very small for the BEV compared to a hybrid. Now, if we have higher electric power demand this opens the possibility new, cleaner power plants which would supply U.S. jobs and reduce our dependency on foreign oil. The way I see it, it's only a matter of time before BEVs take over. All that said, I'm going to keep enjoying my delicious-sounding, dinosaur-juice-burning V-8 for as long as I can!
          veernok
          • 2 Years Ago
          @veernok
          I am not suggesting that EVs don't have an affect on the overall reduction of emissions once in use. That is the very progress I'm referring too. My point is merely that we cannot blindly assume that because we no longer use fossil fuel directly, the problem is completely solved. Did you consider the environmental cost of producing the Prius and the BEV in the first place? I'm not just talking about the energy to get them moving, I'm talking about the actual use of raw materials that goes into making them to begin with. And I fail to see how trading a dependency on foreign oil for a dependency on foreign rare earth metals is any better? There are already serious concerns about China's hold-fast on the majority of rare earth elements. And believe me, I'll be right alongside you enjoying the sound of that dino-juice rumble, while I provide some blips and blurbs with my own right foot to fill in the chorus.
      chuckgoolsbee
      • 2 Years Ago
      Sigh... REALLY? How can a pure EV even be considered to achieve "miles per GALLON"?? There is no way on earth we're really that stupid!
      Nick Allain
      • 2 Years Ago
      You know, comparing apples to apples (electric cars to electric cars) this thing is one hell of a feat of engineering. It's similar in size (cargo, etc) to a 5 series yet gets more range than a ford focus electric which starts at over $39k. Even if you use the performance model which is $85k, it destroys the focus in terms of dollars per range - which I think is the electric-car-statistic-OF-THE-FUTURE. $515.7/mile of range for the focus $320.4/mile of range for the tesla model s I'd calculate the rest, but frankly, it's not even worth the comparison the fit, leaf, and Mitsubishi i don't come in terms of "how much car" you get. Heck, even the focus isn't a good comparison for the model s since there's nothing out there thats both electric and as large/luxurious.
      k_m94
      • 2 Years Ago
      As a petrolhead ("gear"head i guess) I am of the camp that enjoys the sights and sounds of internal combustion, to me, it's like a beating heart. Both are essentially heat pumps, and in terms of efficiency/performance potential, ICE is not past its prime. They said the 60's were the prime of petrol fuelled horsepower, but today's bread and butter spec ponycars would destroy the rarest, most insane, shuddering monsters of that time while being an order of magnitude cleaner and more efficient. There is no reason performance cars of the future can't have 400hp and also 40mpg with lower pollutants than today's Camries. But does the majority of our transportation need to slurp gas until it runs dry? Will there be a great loss if 20 years from now 80% of cars on the road were silent, high range electrics? Even if you hate electric cars, the oil would last a bit longer, and you would hear those V8, F6, V12, V10, I6 masterpieces make their classical music just a little clearer as they shake up traffic. And that isn't saying electric cars have to be humdrum, this Model S has me more excited than say a BMW 550i ever could (similar size, priced luxury car). If Tesla's battery claim holds in the real world, then you can cross off range anxiety from pretty much 99.9% of any potential owners. There will always be that guy who will forget to plug it in the night before.
        RocketRed
        • 2 Years Ago
        @k_m94
        Ttis is the first electric car that I would want to own, sounds notwithstanding. But as far as the glorious sounds, a silent car does seem dreadful---like an electric guitar without the amp. However, not all ICEs sound great either. And like ICE's I think that not all electric cars will sound alike. If you heard the Hybrids at Le Mans this year leave the pits on electric power, the howl was like something from a Sci Fi movie. Hair-raising and very cool. It changed my mind. Power and performance is an aesthetic that can be rendered in a many ways. I'm looking forward to hearing the Audi E-tron road cars.
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