• Mar 27, 2012
Are you the parent of a teenager who hasn't found enough reason to hate your ever-loving guts? Well then OnStar has a new product for you. Dubbed Family Link, the new service will tell you exactly where your OnStar-equipped vehicle is at any time. It will even send you emails or text messages at particular times of day with a location update. It's OnStar's first separately priced feature from its main suite of services, and at $3.99/month is an inexpensive way to invade the privacy of your loved ones while they're driving the car you pay for.

At least, that's how we imagine 16-year-old Tiffany will feel when she finds out her dad is paying the Eye of Sauron to keep its gaze fixed on her little Chevy Sonic.

OnStar, of course, paints a much more flattering picture of the service's purpose. In their own words, it allows "subscribers to stay connected to their loved ones when driving an OnStar-equipped vehicle." In fact, 4,500 subscribers have already tested the service in a pilot program ahead of its limited roll out next month. Family Link will be available to all OnStar subscribers in the U.S. by the end of the year.

Truth be told, we're old enough now to look past Family Link's inherent issues with privacy and see its value as a peace-of-mind bringer to parents and spouses alike. Knowing a loved one arrived safely or is where they're supposed to be is worth having Tiffany hate your guts a little extra. She'll understand one day, and until then: my house, my car, my rules. See the video and the press release below.
Show full PR text
Connected Families Can Rely on OnStar
New Family Link service provides unique access to vehicle location

- Online service helps subscribers locate their vehicle and sign up for location alerts
- $3.99 per month, first a la carte service offered by OnStar


NEW YORK – OnStar today announced the launch of Family Link, a new service that will allow subscribers to stay connected to their loved ones when driving an OnStar-equipped vehicle.

Family Link is an optional service that includes two key features:

Vehicle Locate: Subscribers can log onto the Family Link website to view a map with the vehicle's location at any time.
Vehicle Location Alert: Subscribers can set up email or text message notifications to let them know the location of their vehicle. They can choose the day, time and frequency of the alerts.

Family Link is OnStar's first a la carte service. Subscribers can add it to any existing OnStar package for $3.99 per month.

"For more than 16 years, OnStar has developed and enhanced our service by listening to our customers," said OnStar Vice President of Subscriber Services Joanne Finnorn. "They tell us how they use technology and what they want it to do. Last year, we had more than 4,500 subscribers test the Family Link service and they told us it provides them peace of mind by staying connected to their family when they're on the road."

Family Link begins a phased launch in mid-April with select subscribers invited to sign up. More subscribers will receive an invitation in June. The service will roll out to all U.S. subscribers throughout the year.

Access to the Family Link website requires an OnStar user name and password. Only the subscriber with access can locate a vehicle or request alerts.

To use Vehicle Locate, subscribers log onto the Family Link website and navigate to the Vehicles tab and click on Locate. Once the vehicle has been located, the vehicle's icon will be shown on the map. Additional location details can be seen by hovering over the vehicle.

To set up a Location Alert, subscribers log on to the Family Link website and navigate to the Alerts tab and click on Add Alert. The subscriber can request the day of week and time to receive an alert, as well as notification preference: text, email or both. Location Alerts will include the address the vehicle is near as well as the date and time.

"OnStar continues to evolve because we spend time listening to our subscribers so that we can develop new technologies and applications that meet their needs," said Finnorn. "Family Link is the result of OnStar turning what they imagine into a solution they can use."

OnStar, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Motors, is the global leading provider of connected safety, security and mobility solutions and advanced information technology. With more than 6 million subscribers in the U.S, Canada and China, OnStar is currently available on more than 45 MY 2012 GM models, as well as available for installation on most other vehicles already on the road with OnStar FMV. More information about OnStar can be found at www.onstar.com.


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  • 22 Comments
      mustsvt
      • 2 Years Ago
      Your car used to represent the ultimate personal freedom. Now with tracking, GPS, telemantics, and block boxes the car has become the ultimate snitch.
      TokyoRemix
      • 2 Years Ago
      I have no opinion on the product itself, but I would like to heartily congratulate Autoblog on the best header photo I've seen on an article in a LONG time. A+.
      kroch1
      • 2 Years Ago
      This will be an inexpensive way to track my employees in the company car also!
      BG
      • 2 Years Ago
      Cool. Now if they just had a live camera to record what 16-year-old Tiffany was doing when she was out in the family crossover.
      Dreez28
      • 2 Years Ago
      Haha I love the use of the Eye of Sauron for comparison. Well played Autoblog!
      Pow Ying Hern
      • 2 Years Ago
      The Eye sees all, except OnStar, for it costs 3.99 per month
      Jeff Schroeder
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good idea...teenage years approaching. Next best thing to a chaperone!
      inthelv
      • 2 Years Ago
      What the eff is that a picture of???? If that's what I think it is, I'm glad I was born this way! Eww. One day my mom asked me if I had any idea why she was getting sixty miles to the gallon in her new Rabbit? It was a 1980 with red interior, golf ball shift knob and a sunroof, in other words, sick. I may have (not admitting anything) gone to Mexico a few times. I possibly went to Hollywood a few hundred times while she was asleep. I may have gone to lay out by the pool in Palm Springs a few times after I dropped her off at work in Downtown L.A.. I might just have possibly reached under the dash and turned back the odometer not knowing that my mother, who had just traded in her '72 Thunderbird, was keeping meticulous mileage records. Kids can't have any fun today.
        PossibleHero
        • 2 Years Ago
        @inthelv
        Dude... You really need to book off 12hrs of your life and watch the Lord of the Rings trilogy haha. It's "The Eye" from that series. Lol well played autoblog....
          inthelv
          • 2 Years Ago
          @PossibleHero
          @PossibleHero: Oh Thank God! I was really messed up there for a minute! LOL
      Jim Rathmann
      • 2 Years Ago
      OnStar is evidence that Old GM still exists. It's never been relevant yet they continue to market it.
      Car Guy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Only a matter of time before we will all be tracked "for our own safety". I can see the desire more and more for those living off the grid.............
      Generic
      • 2 Years Ago
      When I was a kid, I drove to Chicago with a friend and had the time of my life and made it back in once piece. Now days, I guess I wouldn't even make it across the sate line. Onstar would kindly kill the engine until the cops show up. Way to go big brodah. I guess it is better to teach the young that everything they do is being watched now, so later in life it will just be normal.
        teamplayers99
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Generic
        It wasn't with your hypochondriac friend and your girlfriend in a 1961 Ferrari GT California was it?
      Mike S
      • 2 Years Ago
      This article is horribly biased and tries way to hard to be funny
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