The high-efficiency vehicle bearing the Arcimoto name (formerly called the Pulse, now the SRK) continues to evolve. The Arcimoto engineering team is on Generation 6, which is smaller and has a shorter wheelbase than earlier versions. The frame is also a bit less tall and has slimmer seats, which reduces the curb weight and also creates a lower center of gravity. On the powertrain side, a new LiFePO4 battery pack, an "eco wire" (read: lighter) from Alpha Wire and an updated motor controller from Ives Meadors at Synkromotive are all being tested. That LiFePO4 pack has got to be more efficient than the ten 12V lead acid batteries that previous Arcimoto prototypes used.

The frame structural changes were made because of data from the "ride experience and drive characteristics" from the firth generation and it looks like the team is getting ready to get multiple copies on the road. The Oregon-based company just sent out an email about the status and said the Gen 6 vehicle, "will be the foundation of the pilot fleet and we have just recently locked the frame and begun build of the vehicle."

You can follow Arcimoto on Facebook, Twitter or on its website. You can also watch a video test drive of the fifth-generation Arcimoto here.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 23 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      Perhaps, there aren't any problems with 3-wheeled vehicles that a fourth wheel won't fix...
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Aptera trike failed. The Green Vehicles trike failed. Arcimoto . . . do you really think you know something they didn't?
        LEONARD
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Thats because it was Zap not the product
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        I don't think its the tree wheels that makes the problem. Aptera failed because the wanted to ship the perfect vehicle. The only way that any start up vehicle manufacture is going to make it is to ship vehicles. Granted they are going to ship vehicles that are less than perfect. I think selling 1000 vehicles in a year will do more for a company than attempting to ship the perfect vehicle, as Aptera has already proven. In the same way the Arcimoto is not yet perfect, but I would gladly drive one tomorrow. I don't think the number of wheels rolling on the pavement is the reason for three wheeled vehicles to fail. Yes, they are unique. Yes, they are different by design, no matter the reason for the design. No, they won't appeal to every car buyer. The factor that could set Arcimoto apart from the other manufactures of three wheeled vehicles is if they can produce them in significant numbers so potential customers can readily purchase them. Rather than putting down a deposit and waiting, and waiting . . . . . I believe Arcimoto is poised to produce the Gen 6 vehicle, flaws and all. That will set them apart and give them capital to produce larger more capable vehicles in the future.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        And the Myers motors NMG. At least they still exist (sorta). You can buy a 1 person trike for $30K. I don't think the Duo ever got built. Voting me down cannot change the fact that the 3-wheeler market has been a graveyard of dreams. And it is definitely nothing buy a niche market now when you can buy $29K to $35K four-wheel EVs with Li-Ion batteries and you get a $7500 tax-credit. Deal with the facts as they are, not as you would like them to be. Be happy that the EV market now has major automakers mass manufacturing EVs.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Oh . . . the Zap Alias trike failed too.
      LEONARD
      • 3 Years Ago
      well looks like the x founder of Zap is about to chage the game!!! $15k maybe less when they ramp up. http://switchvehicles.com/
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @LEONARD
        Well, I'm sure you can trust anything they say.
          LEONARD
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          don't think the founder had anything to do with the later Zap much like Aptera founders and swicth is ready for sale next month sold as a kit which is awesome.
      Levine Levine
      • 3 Years Ago
      Another Aptera rising from the ashes.
      Ryan
      • 3 Years Ago
      They would sell more 4 wheel versions in one month than they could ever sell 3 wheel versions. I don't understand this fascination. Is it just to get around the safety regulations? If they want to be rebels, setup an aftermarket company that will sell a 'conversion kit' that easily converts it to a 4 wheel car that a typical geek could do in an afternoon.
        EZEE
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        Good point. Hey Dan! Do three wheels make that big of a difference on aero and/oe weight?
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          thanks for the info and link, Sirvix! :)
          sirvixisvexed
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          I remember watching a video on the Aptera and them saying how much different the aero and weight were due to the way they could design the rear of the vehicle because it only had one center wheel. Wasn't the Aptera something like 117mpge as compared to the Volt and leaf who are in the 90's? So what does that make it...like 25% more efficient than an aerodynamic 4 wheeler? Mind the question marks in my post, I am half guessing/estimating.
          sirvixisvexed
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EZEE
          Of course I feel the need to research my guesses AFTER i've posted them.....Volt is 93 mpge, Leaf is 99, Aptera 2e seems to be 200. http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2010/09/22/aptera-e/
        methos1999
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        I'm no lawyer, but I suspect that the safety regulations are not negligible for a startup. But I do know that by giving a vehicle 3 wheels instead of 4 it is designated as a "motorcycle". Therefore once it's a motorcycle it avoids the following safety requirements (at least as of 2009...): crumple zones, airbags, seat-belts, anti-lock brakes, electronic stability control... So in short, I don't think 3 wheels is so much a fascination as a necessity for any capital starved automotive startup.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @methos1999
          Reliant Robins were mainly driven by pensioners, so heavy banking by the Department of Works and Pensions ensured them a licence - one death equals one saved pension! Seriously, they were in the 60's and 70's, so the they only had to comply with pro forma safety regulations - the fact that they were lethal did not affect the fact that they were compliant.
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @methos1999
          @Marco I know the Reliant Robin was popular due to licensing requirements (and lack thereof) but did it also not have the same crash test standards? I ask due to being from Britain and all...
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @methos1999
          Methos 1999 Only in some jurisdictions are these dangerous little vehicles permitted. (and not for much longer.) In most countries outside the US, helmuts are compulsory for motorcycles, that might be a disincentive.
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @methos1999
          thanks Dave!
      EVnerdGene
      • 3 Years Ago
      I think there could be a market for a simple 3-wheeled vehicle. The Aptera failed for a number of reasons, but #1 was that it was not simple. They simply tried to do too much; and way too much fru-fru. A simple 3-wheeler could be developed for hundreds of thousands of dollars, not like the hundreds of million it took Tesla to do a vehicle that only sold a coupla-thousand. A $100k+ conversion. No disrespect. I'd love to own one, but way too rich for my pragmatic wallet. Do we all need the safety of riding in armored cars ? If that is true, then how do you explain the popularity of motorcycles - with or without helmets ? A simple 3-wheeler could be a very safe motorcycle, not an unsafe car. If anything should be changed, it is the moronic (and wasteful) thinking that we need Hummers, Escalades, Tundras, Armadas, Expeditions, F1,2,3,450 pick-em-ups to drive one ass to work. My car is not too small, your car is too big.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @EVnerdGene
        They fell between two stools, going high tech but with limited safety etc. Now IMO three wheeler electric vehicles with safety no worse than scooters are a good idea, but the engineering needs to be appropriate and cost effective. I can see the Indians producing these for a couple of thousand dollars or so, and keeping is simple by simply sticking in a few more batteries rather than spending a fortune on lightweight material. Fibre glass over a tubular frame to give it some crash resistance and lead acid batteries are the way to go for this sort of design.
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