Haiyin electric Chevy Camaro – Click above to watch video after the jump

Back in April, Ron Adamwicz's electric 1981 Chevrolet Camaro ripped down the quarter-mile track at Palm Beach International Raceway in just 11.253 seconds. In addition to its record-setting quarter-mile run, the electrified Camaro, dubbed "Warp Factor II," set a world record with a 6.8-second 1/8-mile run at 93.43 miles per hour. And get this: those records were set with just one of the Camaro's two electric motors operational.

On August 6, with both electric motors functioning correctly, the Team Haiyin EV Racing Chevy Camaro tore down the strip at Lebanon Valley Dragway in 10.08 seconds, hitting a top speed of 127 mph. That time puts the electric Camaro within spitting distance of the Black Current, the converted Volkswagen Beetle that holds the world record for "street bodied" electric vehicles.

The time to beat stands at 9.51 seconds. That's simply amazing considering the 1,001-horsepower Bugatii Veyron roars down the 1/4-mile in the mid-10s. Hit the jump to watch the electric Camaro rip down the tarmac.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 40 Comments
      mbukukanyau
      • 3 Years Ago
      A Camaro should never be electric. This is alternate universe stuff
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      apparently has two 11inch DC motors and two zilla2k HV controllers. lipo pack wonder what it weighs. 10 is good but not fantastic for EVs. it can be faster.
      Marco Polo
      • 3 Years Ago
      @black08mustanggt (Good to read your posts) Like you, I find the barking mad troll, Dan Frederiksen, irritating. I also sympathise with many folk who are turned off EV technology, due to the abusive ranting of fanatics. However, please don't throw out the baby with the bathwater! Yeah, the fire breathing Camaro's, Mustangs, Chargers, and all the US muscle cars were great heart racing, icons of an era that spelt youth, freedom and optimism. A great time to be alive! Who couldn't love the silky power of the Aston Martins, Ferrari's etc, and the sheer beauty of the Jaguar XKE (e-type). These cars were showcase wonders of technology. All powered by a wonderfully cheap and compact energy source, Gasoline! But that was 1971, today in 2011, times have changed. It's a very different world. The transport energy source of the 21st century, won't be petroleum based products. For a multitude of reasons, mostly economic and depletion, the 'Age of Oil' is slowly drawing to a close. It's true that alternate current energy storage technology, is still immature and fairly inadequate. But these are pioneering days. The value of Hybrid technology is already well established in mainstream automotive production. The next step is an economical, mass-produced energy storage system. Be patient, and as the new technology unfolds, a whole new a whole new dimension of driving experience, including racing will be created. Automotive engineers, (Real ones, not the lunatic fringe, who just annoy everyone and produce nothing) are already taking the greatest aspect s of the old technologies, and innovating new and exciting technologies, taking automobiles to the next evolution. C'mon, we need guys like you to participate in advancing new and innovative technologies. As a participant in the EV industry for more than 20 years, I apologise for the unpleasant encounters you've experienced with EV advocates whose personality defects, cause them to abuse and alienate those they consider not 'true believers'! These sad individuals are desperate to believe in a righteous cause, so they employ belligerent and abuse rhetoric!. They delude themselves they are 'important players' in a Zealous 'Crusade'. In truth, these sanctimonious fools, are not even on the playing field. But, not all EV advocates are conspiracy theorists or impractical ranters. 2WM's ,sometimes ah.. a little passionate! But that's due to his excitement and enthusiastic appreciation of innovative design. I have tens of millions of dollars invested in EV technology, yet I am the first to admit that an energy storage breakthrough is desperately needed. The EV revolution is all about developing exciting new technologies and having fun! To those who think it's a new method of making others defencive and imposing ideological dogma, by abusing and belittling "heretic's", I paraphrase the immortal Phil Ochs " find yourself another cause to be part of"!
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        .Ruf, ruff, grrr, bite. People agree with DF, now what you gonna do Marco. Just be glad your not Jack Rickard, DF drives him batty. I will just say gas is bad, you should not use it. Oil corps are bad, auto corps suck. I must drive my EV up to the top of a hill and howl at the moon now. Baaroooo, arhooo, hooo... Oh yea I thought you hated these do it yourselfers, ABG is suppose to be about momy vans that the OEMs are producing. Or the unobtainium models that Audi and the like are supposedly producing.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          Your problem is, you don't actually read what other write. It would be very hard for me to hate home-built EV converters, since I have been one myself for nearly 20 years! Yeah, unlike idiots like DF, I have actually built, (or had built), my own EV conversions, and specialist EV vehicles of original design. I also campaign for a number of environmental causes. But, to effect change you must be realistic, or your activism will just disintegrate into a small cheer squad of weirdo's, alienating the general populace, and giving the environmental movement a bad name. Very few people agree with anything DF pontificates. (apart from his alter-ego accounts!) But that's not the point. EV's are just a means of replacing one energy source with another, better technology. Creating a sort of political/religious crusade with 'Evil" and "good " sides, only detracts from general acceptance. Worse, fanaticism, and abusive language, encourages the really unstable sort of zealot whose actions can easily slide into human tragedy. Forget DF and the other trolls and crackpots! Don't waste your time ranting against 'evil' conspiracy's! Harness your energy, and like Ron Adamwicz, do something positive. Lead by example!
        Roy_H
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        There are a number of amazing new developments in battery technology from research labs around the world. Some are even talking about approaching the energy density of gasoline! Unfortunately it will take many years of concerted effort to bring the best of these to commercialization. I am most excited about the near term possibility of http://www.planarenergy.com/ as they are building a pre-production assembly line, so are making the transition from lab to commercialization They expect 3x energy density improvement at about 1/2 the cost per kwh.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Roy_H
          @Roy H. Thanks for the link. Yeah, there are some amazing new developments being announced all the time in EV energy storage technology. The future's lookin' good!
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        "The transport energy source of the 21st century, won't be petroleum based products. For a multitude of reasons, mostly economic and depletion, the 'Age of Oil' is slowly drawing to a close." Indeed. Even if you look at the optimists such as IHS, they think we'll hit a plateau around 2030. My guess has been a peak/plateau around 2015. Something it is now. Some thing 2020. All of those numbers mean that the 21st century will not be an oil-based transport world. ICE is melting (Bad pun and clumsy climate change reference intended. ;-) )
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      This car is awesome and i have been following the build thread. The guy who built it even went so far as to convince the nanotech lithium polymer manufacturer to make him an even more powerful cell capable of 65C output. I believe this car is capable of touching the 8 second mark with those kinds of cells. There is a high level of potential in this machine that is untapped. I can't wait to see what this car is capable of doing in the future.
        Marco Polo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        Exciting stuff, for both spectator and participant! It's these specialist applications that breed mainstream technology transfer.
      Tyler Reilly
      • 3 Years Ago
      I just paid $22.87 for an iPad2-64GB and my girlfriend loves her Panasonic Lumix GF 1 Camera that we got for $38.76 there arriving tomorrow by UPS. I will never pay such expensive retail prices in stores again. Especially when I also sold a 40 inch LED TV to my boss for $675 which only cost me $62.81 to buy. Here is the website we use to get it all from, PennyOrder.com
      Tom
      • 3 Years Ago
      Quiet cars kinda suck :-(
      Walter
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is just EERIE.
      fairfireman21
      • 3 Years Ago
      This car is hot.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      I inquired about the weight. they say 2650lbs and they boast that it's very light. that's certainly room for improvement for a drag racer. I suggest a fiber glass cast of an EV1 on a light tube chassis and the lightest rims (3.5kg) with bfgoodrich g-force drag radials like white zombie wears. one 11" motor direct on 3.5 ratio diff. A123 pack. keep it all under 500kg and you have something : )
        Marco Polo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        DF, I wonder you have survived this long! D'ya ever think one of these guy's who have worked so hard to build a vehicle like this, might not appreciate supercilious suggestions from someone who's never done anything? Keep it up, and one day you'll need a cast. Plaster, not fibre!
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          are you saying you are superior to me?
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          Let's see.....Hmmm....Ron Adamwicz keeps his word by setting a world record in his dragster EV Camaro, you on the other hand have never kept your word, or constructed any vehicle (not even your Ikea boast). Yeah, Ol' Ray Adamwicz rocks! You fail!
        Chris M
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Well, they could do that - if they had enough money - but then it wouldn't be a "street bodied" electric vehicle, and would have to be put in another category. Just be patient, I'm sure sooner or later someone will build an "electric rail" to shame the top-fuel "nitro" dragsters.
      Jim McL
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's all over. I'm not into EVs for speed but for the gear heads that are into it for speed, it's all over. The tipping point has tipped.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jim McL
        only the beginning. there will be electric cars that run like top fuel dragsters
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          I'm pretty sick of people extolling the great ICE engine. Yes, it got this country started on the road toward civilization. Yes, gasoline contains a large amount of energy, but so what. This is the year 2011 and it's time we evolved. ICE's are amazingly complicated and very inefficient. They contain hundreds of moving parts, that constantly need replacing, and the best of them, after 100+ years and billions of dollars in research only convert 20% of the energy in gasoline into motion. Compare this with an EV. It contains 3 major parts (motor, controller and battery) with only 1 that moves and it converts 75-90% of the energy in it's batteries into motion. It's simple, clean, modern, quite, fast and efficient. Regardless of any of the above we really have no choice but to extricate ourselves from our dependence on oil. It's quite frankly running out. We have burned through a large percentage of the readily available supply in only a short 100 years. Every year that we burn oil in our cars is one more year that we are dependent on countries like: Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, etc. Electricity is produced in America, by Americans. Buying electric cars (especially those manufactured in America, like a Tesla), supports our country and keeps our money here and provide us with much needed jobs. I'm so tired of sending billions of dollars to countries that hate us. It just doesn't make any sense. Are EV's perfect? No. Do they have the range of an ICE car? No, not yet. But isn't it worth making a small sacrifice for our country? Isn't it worth American jobs and national security? What about cleaner air to breath? What about amazing performance and "holly crap" acceleration?
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          @David Bannerman. I think everyone, from the major Oil companies to the Automakers, is aware that oil depletion and economic competition from other oil products, will render gasoline an uneconomic product for the 21st century. I think every sensible person examining the alternatives, realises that of all the competing replacement technologies, NG derivatives, LPG etc is the most mature technology, but only a stop gap. Leaving EV technology , with hydrogen as an outsider. But, it's unproductive to huff and puff indignantly at people like black08mustanggt. There are two sides to every issue. Energy storage, remains a drawback to EV technology, and the long tailpipe to coal fired power stations, must be addressed. These problems will be resolved with time. But the support of ICE guys like black08mustanggt, is going to be essential, if sufficient investment to make the transition is to be secured. Oh, btw, the US imports no oil from Iran. Not trading with Middle Eastern governments, will not make them hate the US less, just force them to sell to the PRC, leaving the USA with no influence at all!
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          hehe I welcome a new ignorant. stick with us and we'll have you cleaned up in no time. it used to be 300 miles. and when it's 400 there will be ignorant people who demand it will go 500 miles at 100mph on a charge. and so on
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          @black08mustanggt How often do you actually drive 300 miles in a day. Most people RARELY drive that far. You are falling for the trap of 'if it is not better than current technology on ever metric then it is useless'. Well . . . if that were true then: -No one would listen to MP3s because their audio quality sucks compared to CDs. -Notebook computers would be unpopular since they are generally slower and have crappy graphics compared to desktop computers. -No one would use cellular telephones since the audio quality sucks and they are much more expensive. But all those technologies are quite popular since they provide advantages in other areas even though they are worse than current technology in some areas. When gasoline costs $7/gallon and an EV with a 100 mile range can handle all your daily commuter needs for a merely equivalent of 40 cents per gallon then the EV wins. Rent a gasser when you take that 300 mile trip. I guarantee that unless you die within the next 30 years, you will eventually find yourself driving a car with electric drive.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          @Dave Braverman I wish I could hit the 'thumbs up' a few hundred times for your post.
          black08mustanggt
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          New? No, I'm just not fond of this comment system and have never bothered to respond to your drivel. You didn't answer my question, as usual for you. Fine 300 miles, I don't care I was just using the yardstick in my garage, imagine that. Regardless, you seem to believe that batteries with the energy density of gasoline are going to be invented out of whole cloth tomorrow. Why? Most every revolutionary breakthrough has been made by mistake or unintentionally benefitted affected tech. Yet you seem to have enormous faith that research is going to create said battery 'really soon'. I'm not arguing that electric cars cannot be fast or functional, just like the ICE it just takes money. But as far as energy storage goes, do you think they are going to be able to evolve current battery tech to meet the distance benchmarks set by ICE’s or are you positive a massive breakthrough is ‘just around the corner’?
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          I guess my point is that we are in a tight spot. We depend on oil to do some very important things in this country and around the world. It would be devastating to our way of life if there was an interruption of our supply of oil or even if the price continues to climb in the steady manor it's been doing. Relying on a product that we have to import from some of the most unstable regions in the world makes us quite vulnerable. So I disagree with your statement that no one is asking for an alternative. Maybe you are not asking, but a lot of other people are. Another point of mine is that I see a lot of my money and the money of my fellow Americans pouring out of our pockets into the hands of others. Wouldn't it be great to keep that money in our country? What about the jobs it would create if America started to build this new technology and export it around the world? What about the jobs to rebuild our national electric grid with clean energy to charge all these EV's? There are thousands of Americans out of work and we have work that needs to get done so it makes sense to put the two together. With that in mind it seems like we need an alternative. So far, in my opinion, EV's are the best bet we've got, for most people. Like I said there not perfect, but neither is the ICE, neither is hydrogen, every platform has it's drawbacks. I like EV's because: - The energy to supply them can be produced domestically. It can also be produced in a clean manor with solar and wind. - The charging infrastructure is mostly there already. We already have electricity supplying almost every house and building in American we just need to install the very end point of the system, the charger. Hydrogen we have to install the entire system. - 80% of Americans drive less than 40 miles a day. So for most people, most of the time, driving range isn't that much of an issue. Most Americans have two cars anyway, so one could be an EV and the other an ICE for long trips and such. Alternatively one could rent an ICE powered car once or twice a year for those long trips. - While currently EV's have a higher up front purchase price their operating costs are much lower over the life of the vehicle. Also, as with all new technology (cell phones, computers, EV's, etc) prices will fall over time. - I've driven a few different EV's including a scooter I own and my friends Tesla roadster. In both cases their are quite, powerful and a lot of fun to drive. @Marco Polo - Iran is part of OPEC and we import plenty of oil from OPEC, so we do in fact import oil from Iran. - I disagree with your statement that we need the support of people like black08mustanggt. My entire point is that the age of oil is fast coming to a close. If he wants to continue paying $4 (or probably more very soon) a gallon for gasoline into his mustang that gets 15mpg that's cool with me. It's his money let him spend it how he wants. As for me I'd rather put $.50 into my EV.
          black08mustanggt
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          "We have been seeing advances in watt-hours per kg every year. Only a few short years ago, they were storing 200whr/kg in exotic ( $$$ ) cells. Now those same cells store 240wh/kg+ and 200wh/kg is trickling down into cars. The upper level Tesla model S will do 300 miles. That was not possible 3 years ago." If such impressive battery tech is around why does the Leaf only go 100 miles, Nissan gimped it intentionally? They have a building full of engineers but you two have figured it out? Cute. Why do the Volt and Prius have ICE's? Let me guess, the big three are beholden to the oil companies. "Look at how many hours of battery life they have been cramming into laptops in the last few years." They’ve been making the laptops components more efficient, the batteries have hardly changed in spec. But I guess I have my answer, you guys really believe all of the tech is already here. I guess we will see what Toyota I think it is and Tesla spit out next.
          black08mustanggt
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          "only the beginning. there will be electric cars that run like top fuel dragsters" Yet, it’s still irrelevant. A one off vehicle will be able to accomplish one task some day in the future. Big deal. When you create a battery that will let me do 90 on the interstate for 400 miles without stopping and doesn’t use any gas, please speak up. Until then STFU about your electric car jones.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          I totally agree with Dan. I have read up on the development of these batteries. They are *perfect* for drag racing. I'm talking 390 amps out of one 6ah cell. The electric drivetrain in this dragster is not even beginning to touch what the batteries can put out; 3 times more power than an A123. This is only the beginning. Gasoline will not stand up to electric in the end. Some of the most hardcore gas guys are moving to electric. It happened in the RC car/plane world, it has happened in the power-assist bicycle world, it's just starting to take off in motorcycles, and cars are next. If any of you are in the Portland, OR area, come on over and take a ride on my 50lb electric bike.that does 40mph. You'll stop wondering why us EV fanatics are so fanatical, i guarantee.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          @Dave Braverman Dave, OPEC is not, as such an exporter, more like a trade organisation. The US buys from individual countries, not OPEC. The US buys no Iranian oil. You miss my point about why you need guys like black08mustanggt. To fund an alternative to an oil based economy takes a vast amount of capital. Both private and government (Taxpayer) . Only the taxpayer can provide the sort of long term, unprofitable investment funding that is required for such a monumental task. This needs the approval of guys like black08mustanggt. Convince him, that he is investing in the future, and the capital is provided for R&D. Otherwise, the whole process slows down. Nearly all EV R&D has been funded by government incentives, tax breaks and direct investment. The amount of private capital involved has been relatively limited. There is nothing wrong with this, after all future planning is a wise expenditure of tax money, but governments need voters, like black08mustanggt's approval.
          2 Wheeled Menace
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Dude, you don't need batteries with the energy density of gasoline in the first place. Gas engines are ~20% efficient and electric is 70-90% efficient. Switching out an internal combustion engine saves you hundreds of pounds and gives you plenty of room to pack the batteries in. We have been seeing advances in watt-hours per kg every year. Only a few short years ago, they were storing 200whr/kg in exotic ( $$$ ) cells. Now those same cells store 240wh/kg+ and 200wh/kg is trickling down into cars. The upper level Tesla model S will do 300 miles. That was not possible 3 years ago. We already have the tech to do what gas cars do, it's just that it's new and still expensive. Look at how many hours of battery life they have been cramming into laptops in the last few years. Lithium batteries keep getting better every year, while the limits of gasoline have been known for a long time.
          black08mustanggt
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Ya'll done now? I've tried to respond a few times but you guys are all over the place and I didn't want to spawn more questions than answers. It boils down to this, you guys are puffing your chest about what an electric motor can do, but no one is asking. Anyone who could fog a mirror in high school physics knows that an electric motor can replace an ICE as a motor. You want to talk about lack of innovation over 180 years, how has the electric motor changed in its lifetime? Not much, we've just become better metalworkers. Not a much evolved system if you ask me. Until you can power it at a reasonable price in a manner that meets or exceeds the abilities of an ICE, it’s a toy. You guys should pay more attention to Marco Polo, he seems to be the only one who doesn’t have his head in the clouds. And he's a better writer. Once you guys get a better storage medium, you'll be able to sell EV's. But until then you're a bunch of outliers comparing top fuel dragsters to rail guns. Good luck with that.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          black08mustanggt says: "Until you can power it at a reasonable price in a manner that meets or exceeds the abilities of an ICE, it’s a toy." Well . . . educate yourself son. The price of powering an EV with its fuel is much MUCH cheaper than ICE. Do you not realize that? Are you not reading the responses or do you fail to comprehend them? Right now, OVER THE LIFETIME OF THE VEHICLE, an EV is probably close to an ICE car for total operating costs. Yes, even though an EV is more expensive, the operating costs are much cheaper. And while the price of oil is going to continue rising faster than people want, electricity prices will not . . . we have lots of natural gas, coal, hydro, nuclear, wind, sun, etc. So when you do your back-of-the-envelope calculation, you probably assume a price of $4/gallon from now until the car dies. But that is dreaming.
      Ford Future
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow. Silent Power.
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