Domestic automakers have outpaced their import counterparts on the top ten list of most stolen vehicles for the first time since 2002. According to a new report by the National Insurance Crime Bureau, Ford vehicles took three places on the Most Stolen Vehicles of 2010 list, while two Chevrolet and two Dodge models also made the cut. To be fair, only the 1999 Chevrolet full-size pickup (read: Silverado) and 1997 Ford F-150 broke into the top five – those models landed themselves in fourth and fifth place, respectively. The podium spots go to the 1994 Honda Accord in first, the 1995 Honda Civic in second and the 1991 Toyota Camry in third.

Even though thieves seem to have cultivated a taste for domestic models, vehicle theft on the whole has continued to decline. NICB says that early FBI crime statistics for 2010 indicated a substantial 7.2 percent decrease in stolen vehicles over 2009. Once verified, that will give 2010 the honor of being the year with the fewest stolen vehicles since 1967. Hit the jump for the press release.
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NICB Names 10 Most Stolen Vehicles for 2010

Domestic Automakers Occupy Six Positions-Most Since 2002

DES PLAINES, Ill., Aug. 2, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The National Insurance Crime Bureau today released Hot Wheels-its list of the 10 most stolen vehicles in the United States. The report examines vehicle theft data submitted by law enforcement to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) and determines the vehicle make, model, and model year most reported stolen in 2010.

For 2010, the most stolen vehicles* in the nation were:

1994 Honda Accord
1995 Honda Civic
1991 Toyota Camry
1999 Chevrolet Pickup (Full Size)
1997 Ford F150 Series/Pickup
2004 Dodge Ram
2000 Dodge Caravan
1994 Acura Integra
2002 Ford Explorer
1999 Ford Taurus

Hot Wheels is the only report that examines all theft data without regard to a vehicle's insured status thereby providing a more complete view of the vehicle theft landscape. For example, certain models of older cars and trucks are popular with thieves because of the value of their parts-but many are not insured against theft. Whereas newer, more expensive and insured vehicles are often stolen to be resold intact with counterfeit vehicle identification numbers or shipped out of the country.

Nationally-and for the first time since 2002-thieves preferred domestic makes over foreign brands. Ford took three spots, Dodge two and Chevrolet held one while the remaining four were held by Honda, Toyota and Acura. However, the top three positions continue to be held by Honda and Toyota models, a trend that has been consistent since 2000.

Overall, vehicle thefts continue their decline. Preliminary 2010 FBI crime statistics point to a further 7.2 percent reduction over the thefts posted in 2009. Should the preliminary numbers hold when the FBI produces its final statistics later this year, 2010 will post the fewest vehicle thefts since 1967.

Improved technology is one of the keys to lower theft rates and the Hot Wheels statistics demonstrate that. Of the nearly 52,000 Honda Accords stolen in 2010, over 44,000 were models made in the 1990s, compared with fewer than 5,700 that were produced since the year 2000.

Even though the continuing decline in vehicle thefts is great news, if it happens to you it can be financially devastating and just an all-around hassle. NICB urges motorists to follow its "layered approach" to auto theft prevention. By employing these simple, low-cost suggestions people can make their vehicles less attractive to thieves.

NICB's four layers of protection are:

Common Sense: Lock your car and take your keys. It's simple enough, but many thefts occur because owners make it easy for thieves to steal their cars.

Warning Device: Having and using a visible or audible warning device is another item that can ensure that your car remains where you left it.

Immobilizing Device: Generally speaking, if your vehicle can't be started, it can't be stolen. "Kill" switches, fuel cut-offs and smart keys are among the devices which are extremely effective.

Tracking Device: A tracking device emits a signal to the police or to a monitoring station when the vehicle is stolen. Tracking devices are very effective in helping authorities recover stolen vehicles. Some systems employ "telematics" which combine GPS and wireless technologies to allow remote monitoring of a vehicle. If the vehicle is moved, the system will alert the owner and the vehicle can be tracked via computer.

Considering a used vehicle purchase? Check out VINCheck(SM), a free vehicle history service for consumers. Since 2005, NICB has offered this limited service, made possible by its participating member companies. Check it out at: www.nicb.org/vincheck.

Anyone with information concerning vehicle theft and insurance fraud can report it anonymously by calling toll-free 1-800-TEL-NICB (1-800-835-6422), texting keyword "fraud" to TIP411 (847411) or by visiting our web site at www.nicb.org.

About the National Insurance Crime Bureau: headquartered in Des Plaines, Ill., the NICB is the nation's leading not-for-profit organization exclusively dedicated to preventing, detecting and defeating insurance fraud and vehicle theft through data analytics, investigations, training, legislative advocacy and public awareness. The NICB is supported by more than 1,100 property and casualty insurance companies and self-insured organizations. NICB member companies wrote over $317 billion in insurance premiums in 2010, or approximately 80 percent of the nation's property/casualty insurance. That includes more than 93 percent ($151 billion) of the nation's personal auto insurance. To learn more visit www.nicb.org.

* This report reflects stolen vehicle data reported to NCIC in 2010. No further filtering of information is conducted, i.e., determining the total number of a particular make and model currently registered in the U.S. for comparison purposes.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 24 Comments
      Jason H
      • 3 Years Ago
      1999 Chevy truck...Hmmm... I own one of these. The only plausible reason I can think of for its inclusion on this list is PARTS. Since buying the truck a year ago, I've replaced the passenger mirror, replaced the turn signal/multiswitch, replaced the windshield wiper motor, replaced the mirror positioning switch, replaced the front swaybar bushings, replaced the fuel pump (twice) and replaced the entire goddamned rear axle assembly because the G80 exploded and took the R&P with it. Parts, Jake
      You guy
      • 3 Years Ago
      You could be wheelchair bound with cerebral palsy and steal a 94 Accord. That's why they're #1.
      axiomatik
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm amazed that there are enough examples of the top three still on the road to make this list. I can't even think of the last time I saw a 91 Camry.
      Emil
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm wondering how much you make by stealing a '91 Camry?!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      KAG
      • 3 Years Ago
      the Ford Explorer is a odd one, but the rest of the American cars seems like police and government fleet cars. Odd, no German cars.
      Mike K
      • 3 Years Ago
      This list is how you know car thieves aren't car enthusiasts. The 3 Fords on the list are terrible. If you're going to steal an F150, you want a 99 and up; 2002 Explorers are the worst year in the History of Explorers; and the 99 Taurus is the last year before the interior overhaul. The only vehicle on that list worth stealing is the 04 dodge RAM.
        Blake
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mike K
        It's not the vehicle, it's the PARTS.
          xxxZOMBIExxx
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Blake
          ....and to add to that. It's about the vehicles that are easiest to steal and have the most profitable parts.
        Mike K
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mike K
        You guys are teh suck at humor...
      MrWhopee
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have to agree! Who'd take a 1999 Taurus even if the doors' unlocked and the key's in the ignition? Well, sure I'd take it if my car broke down miles from home. But most thieves took cars for money, so more importantly, who'd buy a 1999 Ford Taurus? Even with clear title it's pretty hard to sell, I think. I guess they'd strip it for parts. Given how unreliable they are, those who were still on the road would need lots of parts, I think.
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MrWhopee
        Uh the 3rd generation Taurus was a pretty solid car. Tauruses have ALWAYS been known for their reliability.
      • 3 Years Ago
      No Escalade?Really??
        Blake
        • 3 Years Ago
        Read. Read the words. The words will help explain.
          tinted up
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Blake
          Read? I don't even know how to type, I made this message by smashing my forehead against the keyboard. Must be a miracle I know.
      sinistro79
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow, I didn't realize that the 1990's produced so many cars that people would still want, let alone be willing to steal. I never owned a car built in the 1990s. Can somebody please tell me what the allure of this decade is???
        mcdonaldtyler
        • 3 Years Ago
        @sinistro79
        no security system
        Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        @sinistro79
        HUGE market for parts, and plenty of shady shops who'll buy from obvious crooks.
      Rampant
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow..I have a 97 F150.
      Mundotaku
      • 3 Years Ago
      I see the same cars as always. The only one I don't see that usually was on the list is the Escalade. I suppose is because all have been stole or damage thank to the idiotic modifications their owners love to do.
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