• Oct 4, 2009
2010 Nissan GT-R – Click above for high-res image gallery

Hot on the heels of reports, brought to you by British car site PistonHeads upon their visit to the Nissan's Ring-side test facility, of updates planned for the current R35-generation Nissan GT-R comes another report detailing the Japanese automaker's plans for the next-generation R36 model.

With competitors lining up to challenge the current GT-R's performance benchmark, Nissan's senior veep for global product planning, Andy Palmer, confirmed that plans are underway to succeed Godzilla with a next-generation model. The R36 will, according to the report, carry over the current model's twin-turbo V6, but with enough modifications to keep it ahead of the pack. The new GT-R is expected to hit the road by 2013 at the latest. Beyond that, Palmer didn't disclose many details, except to say that Nissan is committed to the GT-R program and won't be letting the Porsche 911 GT2 alone without a fight.



Photos copyright ©2009 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc.

[Source: PistonHeads]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 37 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      I hope it will be lighter and smaller. Seen it in person and it is kinda big. Would never expect a car that HUGE to haul so much ass!
      • 5 Years Ago
      Can't wait to see how it will look like. The design will probably be pretty crazy.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Hopefully we can have an evolutionary design in the GT-R much like the 911. While the design of the GT-R may not be to everyone's tastes, its certainly masculine and distinctive.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Screw Toyota and Honda, they don't have the spirit to make an interesting product anymore. Mazda though, I want to see that new rotary in a chassis that puts supercars to shame.

        Also, I hope to god the R36 loses some weight and gains some good looks. The R34 had a bit of a big back end but the front was gorgeous despite being so square and simple. Aggressive but not painfully blocky would be quite an improvement.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Toyota, Honda, Mazda....your moves please....
        • 5 Years Ago
        Its from Japan, of course its gonna be crazy. Lets just hope its "lambo" crazy, and not "PT Cruiser" crazy.
        • 5 Years Ago
        It probably will, unlike the decades look of the Porsche.
      • 5 Years Ago
      I just hope the new GT-R isn't so gargantuan. I mean the R34 was already pretty big compared to the nimble R32, but the current GT-R dwarfs even the R34. Does all that techno-wizardry need to be in such a mammoth car? Trim it down both in size and weight and that'd be pretty awesome right there. Look at a size comparison between the old NSX and GT-R and you'll see what I'm talking about:

      http://jalopnik.com/assets/images/gallery/12/2008/03/thumb800x800_2317239194_07beae4f47_o.jpg
      • 5 Years Ago
      For me as well, the R34 will always be the king of GT-R's as far as looks and culmination of all of the engineering behind the RB26DETT goes. I had the good fortune to drive a stock one last year and it was incredible.

      However, for the R36, the only thing I'd really like to get changed is dropping in an authentic manual transmission and be willing to give a little in the epic technological achievement for just pure driving passion. Although I'm sure that before that happens Nissan will have some swampland to sell to me.
        • 5 Years Ago
        This design would lose a lot of speed on the track without this transmission.

        The DCG allowed them to fit really short gears for better accleration without it being cumbersome to have to shift all the time. Totally the opposite of a long-geared, high-rpm sports car.


        They could certainly do it. But I think it would be shocking how much of a downgrade it would be on this particular model.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Pretty cool there on there way to the next GT-R, Nissan had a design studio outside San Francisco, I bet one of the bloggers might see a test mule sitting outside there.
      • 5 Years Ago
      JUST FIX THAT UGLY FACE AND I'M SOLD
      • 5 Years Ago
      I know, you could make it even bigger!

      Just kidding.

      This vehicle could use a serious lightening. If they could find a way to get the engine to the back so that they could get rid of the extra driveshaft, that'd be a great start.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Ditching the back seat and shortening the car would be a start.

        I would think that putting the transmission in the front (with a PTO to the rear) would be more likely than relocating the engine to the rear. The packaging, and non RWD bias make the front transmission a non-starter. The FM and PM platforms can't take a rear-mid configuration, so Nissan is out of luck there, too.

        The car needs a diet, but short of MORE extensive use of exotic materials, I don't think they're going to be able to do much. My nightmare is that Nissan will target the car for more volume (like their M-Spec GT-R), and will soften and weight down the car even more.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Will this motivate Honda to bring back the NSX?
      • 5 Years Ago
      Well it makes sense. At first I figured that was much too early but by then the GTR would be about 5 years old.
      • 5 Years Ago
      @Mercennarius

      You don't know, there's no such thing as a V32, 33 or 34. The first V skyline was the 35 and then the v36. The new GT-R has the R35 code.
      • 5 Years Ago
      All the next GTR gotto be is lighter. Thats it, no crazy styling, no need to get more grip, no need get more power even. Take a page from Mazda, more does not mean better.
      JDM Life
      • 5 Years Ago
      R34 still will be my fav GTR.



      The next one will look like a space ship if they continue with that design....
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