• Sep 11, 2009

Click above to watch the video after the jump

The Ford Focus is an automotive study in duality. Europeans get a really good, second generation version of Ford's C-segment wunderkind, while motorists here in the U.S. make do with an updated family based on the first-generation model. Actually, we call the second-gen Focus the "Euro" model, but the fact is that most of the free world receives the newer, superior model, while America waits patiently for the 2011 model to come hither. Our Mexican neighbors to the south have nothing to wait for, for in the land of Pancho Villa, the upgraded Focus is the Focus of record.

Beyond the jump
is the latest commercial for the Focus, and it's a good one. For starters, Ford's marketing team chose some sweet tunes for the commercial's sound track. Here's a hint on the song: you'll want to wax vintage automobiles and paint acres of fencing as soon as you hear it.

The commercial appears to be some sort of Skip-Barber-meets-Tim-Burton driving school, with a Bourne Supremacy-style pursuit and an ass-kicking parallel parking job. At the end of the video, members of the Mexico viewing audience gets a quick glimpse of a lime green 2010 Focus RS in all its 300 horsepower glory. Hit the jump to view the video – and if you can't remember where you've heard that soundtrack before, watch the second video as well. Thanks for the tip, Miguel!

[Source: Ford via YouTube]





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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 54 Comments
      • 5 Years Ago
      That Focus RS looked badass when it swung around that corner.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Sweet, can't wait to buy one of these when my job gets outsourced to Mexico.
      • 5 Years Ago
      The cut-out carboard car he was racing was a Mitsubishi Evolution. Riiiiight. Keep dreaming Ford.
      Maybe the RS would be better suited.
        • 5 Years Ago
        +1 BigMcLargeHuge
        • 5 Years Ago
        Have you noticed that it is a commercial?
        • 5 Years Ago
        Mabye it was just a cardboard Lancer dressed up like a cardboard Evo.

        That cardboard dude thought that a cardboard wing adds 20 cardboard horsepower.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Can i buy a Focus RS from Mexico and register it here in the US?
        • 5 Years Ago
        "Can i buy a Focus RS from Mexico and register it here in the US?" - Mr PIP



        You could, but because a substantially-similar version of the car does is not already certified for sale in the US already, you'd have to first stump up a bond for 1.5 times the value of the vehicle and pay it to a Registered Importer - who then have to demonstrate to the DOT and EPA that it can be converted to FMVSS. That means conducting vehicle crash-testing and emissions conversion all at your expense ... I can assure you that unless the vehicle is rare and worth several hundred thousand dollars, the cost of importation is completely uneconomical and outside of the range of many private individuals.

        If you're not a US citizen or permanent resident, you can import one for up to one year however with no restrictions. But after one year you either have to export it again or put it through the testing to convert it to FMVSS, If neither are done, the DOT can - and will - order the vehicle to be crushed.
      • 5 Years Ago

      I'll take that RS in a second. I'll even keep it Green (though I do like the Blue color better).

      On another note...did anyone notice Chad McQueen in the Karate Kid video? He plays Dutch, the Cobra Kai member fighting Daniel at the end of the video. I never knew it until recently that it was him in the movie. Looks like dad alright, down to the blond hair.
      • 5 Years Ago
      the way the RS appears its awesome...
        • 5 Years Ago
        "The differences between Euro and U.S. specs are, in most cases, negligible and have no reason for existing other than to justify someone's department in the federal government."

        +1!

        In some cases though, European cars have higher safety specs, like the always-mentioned amber tailights and side repeaters (or LED lights on the mirrors.) Xenon headlights in Europe require those little headlamp washers, etc

        I just love how Ford and co remove safety features like these from their North American offerings. How is removing lights and signals a higher standard? I'm starting to believe that, these days, the US safety spec exists mostly to prevent a lot of global car makers from bringing their makes to North America, as they have to spend millions to make changes in bumpers, etc. Just a loophole to get around free trade agreements, etc. The result is the former big three don't have to compete as much here as in the rest of the world, and so we get shoddier products and less choice. Look at the Ford Ranger the rest of the world gets, compared to the 15(?) year old model we have.

        OK, rant done. Now I'll remove my tinfoil hat. :-)
      • 5 Years Ago
      I think it's Mexico because the license plate frame is designed for a Mexican/U.S. style license plate and not a Euro (short and wide) one.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Does anyone have a link to a comparison between US and EURO car regulations? Because I still don't understand why the euro spec and us specs models are so different... And why it's so hard to import vehicles even though they are built by american companies...
        • 5 Years Ago
        "The differences between Euro and U.S. specs are, in most cases, negligible and have no reason for existing other than to justify someone's department in the federal government."

        That simply isn't true. The differences between UNECE and FMVSS go far deeper than lighting and bumper regulations. They delve into door and seat belt mountings, glass, and differences in crash testing which affects minor details throughout the vehicle. Ford once advertised the fact that when it converted its Windstar MPV for sale in continental Europe, it performed some 3,000 modifications in order to do so - most of which lay beneath the skin.

        If you've ever used an RI to personally import a vehicle into the States, or imported a car into the EU and put it through type-approval testing (which is far less stringent but focusses on lighting, glass, seat belts, etc), then you'll know first-hand that the differences are more than "negligible".
        • 5 Years Ago
        The differences between Euro and U.S. specs are, in most cases, negligible and have no reason for existing other than to justify someone's department in the federal government.

        Tax dollars hard at work.
      • 5 Years Ago
      BEST COMMERCIAL EVER!!

      except for those Bud Light Real Men of Genius commercials....

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1b3pJYfv5eg&feature=related

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KG1CjFoX-8E&feature=related
      • 5 Years Ago
      All I learned from that video is that the Mexican market Focus doesn't have ABS.
        • 5 Years Ago
        "All I learned is how pitiful it is that countries with 3rd world roads get better cars than the US."

        Mexico gets it because they allow the sale of cars meeting either US or EU regulations. It's lax enough that Ford still sells the 1997-era F150 and F250 LD there.
        • 5 Years Ago
        All Mexican Ford Focus has ABS
        • 5 Years Ago
        ...and here in the UAE we have what is called "a sense of humor."
        • 5 Years Ago
        Also this "third world roads" mess in a myth.

        Have you been to Mexico City? There's plenty of pavement. It's a traffic nightmare.
        It shouldn't be equated with the forest of African nations.
        • 5 Years Ago
        Geo.Stewart, I've been in México since July 25th and to be honest, the roads are much better than Pennsylvania and Michigan roads, and at least on par with roads in New York. Also, México charges significantly more in road tolls than the United States, as a percentage of GDP because they have to build roads through mountains far more often than we do, as a percentage of our roads built.

        To be honest, their roads are much nicer in terms of pavement although some of the layouts are questionable. That likely has to do with the fact that many cities in México are much, much older than cities in the United States and have roads built on pre-existing layouts. They also don't really have snow or roadsalt, though.

        Cliffs: México: better pavement than US in many areas, sometimes the road layout isn't brilliant...though if you can, the drive from México City to Acapulco is *incredible*.
      • 5 Years Ago
      Seems to me that we need to dump US FMVSS standards, and just go with UNECE like the rest of the world. Better yet - combine the best of the two standards and make one global standard. It would be nice to have the option of buying whatever vehicle we want AND make it legal to drive on our roads.



      • 5 Years Ago
      Quite a few of these can be seen in San Diego.
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