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Autoblog addict Chuck Goolsbee was out in his E-Type last weekend and naturally wanted to avoid the freeway in such a delightful car. Pulling a Clark Griswold, Chuck got lost on an Indian reservation. Rather than have the neighborhood assist in stripping excess mass from his swoopy kitty, Chuck noticed the sun glinting off a vaguely familiar shape off in the distance. The front bumper wrapped tightly around a low nose, and chrome-ringed headlamps were tucked safely behind plexiglass lenses. "Wow," Chuck thought, "another E-Type!" Car people are social creatures, so Chuck's plans changed in an instant. Passenger footwell clogged with grocery bags, ice cream turning into warm milk, he pulled up to the curb and suddenly realized he was in the presence of something even more special than an E-Type.

[Source: Chuck Goolsbee]

Related Gallery1971 Mazda Cosmo Sport


What he'd stumbled upon turned out to be a 1971 Mazda Cosmo Sport. The Mazda Cosmo bears a strong resemblance to a Jaguar E-type when viewed from the front. From certain angles, it's a dead ringer for a Series III E. The long trunk is more '65 Olds than anything from England, but the overall effect is nowhere near as disjointed as that might sound. In fact, this little white coupe has a tightly drawn form and looks smashing with a tasteful set of Minilites in the fenders. Not only is it pretty, it's one of three in the country. You and Jay Leno could hang out at club meets and compare your rare Wankel-powered coupes if you have the $36,000 the seller is asking. If this car is as nice in person as it looks in these shots, its rarity and eye-catching form make the price seem relatively reasonable. Trying to buy something equally scarce is usually a lot more expensive, and restoration costs for typically rusty 1960s coupes can easily surpass $36,000. We don't know if its sold yet, but Chuck's got your hookup if you want to make an offer.

Thanks for finding the car and taking the awesome pix, Chuck!