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Well, it’s not actually the Detroit police. Those brave souls would do well to soldier on with their heavily armored Crown Vics. It’s actually the campus police of Wayne State University in Detroit who have received the first hydrogen fuel cell-powered police vehicle in the world. The vehicle will operate in and around the campus and serve as a “learning laboratory” for WSU students enrolled in the country’s first masters-degree program in alternative energy.

The campus po-po’s paddy wagon is based on DaimlerChrysler’s innovative F-Cell hydrogen vehicle, which has a 100-mile range and a top speed of 85 mph. The electric motor develops 88 horsepower, just enough to run down jaywalkers and truant students. Sixty mph is reached in 16 seconds or next semester, whichever comes first.

[Source: DaimlerChrysler]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 4 Comments
      • 9 Years Ago
      Are you kidding me? US Mercedes snobs wouldn't stand for it. A sub-compact hatchback sitting next to the g-wagon on the dealer's lot, blasphemy! (Bad enough there is the C-Class coupe right) They are going to have to make a new brand in order to sell something like this in the States. (Like Smart, although that seems to be falling apart)
      • 9 Years Ago
      Back "in the day", local meter maids drove Harley Davidson servicars,(three wheelers). Perfect.
      • 9 Years Ago
      I don't mind the B-Class .. but popo should stick with their crown vics ..
      • 9 Years Ago
      I find it interesting that theyr're teting a vehicle (the A-class) that they won't even bring into the US. It's a great car that's economical and practical in gas or diesel trim.

      DCX is more intersted in putting out gas guzzling Dyrangos, diesel Jepps with lousy fuel economy and launching multiple vehicles in the same market segement.

      This fuel cell test is admirable. But why not bring the A-class over for real?