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Advanced charging infrastructure in Portland, Ore. allows electric vehicle drivers to go further, faster

There's a good reason that Aerovironment proudly displayed the 20-year-old EV1 in its booth at the Electric Vehicle Symposium (EVS26): it's not a newcomer.

Nissan is looking to sell as many as 2,000 DC quick-charging stations within the next two years, as the Japanese automaker looks to boost sales of its all-electric Leaf by providing owners an opportunity to almost completely recharge the car in a half hour, Green Car Reports reported, citing an interview with Nissan North America spokesman Brendan Jones.

Stemming from an agreement signed back in September of 2010, Eaton Corporation and Murphy Oil USA have revealed what's believed to be the nation's first Level 3 quick-charge unit installed at, wait for it, a gas station.

Nissan has teamed up with leading European firms, including Circutor, DBT, Efacec, Endesa and Siemens, to speed development and installation of public-access quick-charge stations across Europe.

The Oregon Department of Transportation has turned to AeroVironment to install quick-charge stations along the I-5 corridor from California in the south to the Willamette Valley region in the north. This install is part of the West Coast Green Highway project – a vision for a consistent charging infrastructure spanning the West Coast from San Diego, CA to Vancouver, B.C.

Craig Childers, a zero-emissions specialist at the California Air Resources Board (CARB), said it appears that the U.S. is leaning towards the adoption of a non-CHAdeMO quick-charge standard for plug-in vehicles, according to All Cars Electric. Though Childers admits that this is not a "done deal," he claims that "automotive companies are lobbying for only one opening for powering the car to allow for cleaner design."

The state of Washington is hoping to turn the interstate 5 corridor that runs from Canadian border to Oregon into the nation's first electric highway. With the help of a $1.32 million federal grant, Washington hopes to install between seven and 10 so-called Level 3 electric vehicle charging stations along the main north-south road. Level 3 stations charge at 400 volts and 30 amps or more. Such stations can charge a typical EV battery to 80 percent full in under 30 minutes.

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