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Toyota's factory in Tianjin, China is closed until at least August 19 due to evacuations in the area related to the massive explosion there last week. Other automakers are also feeling the effects.

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The FAW-Toyota joint venture is struggling in China. Around 10 percent of dealers might have to shut their doors and 95 percent are reportedly operating at a loss this year. The sellers are complaining that their lots are packed with cars that can't be sold, and they're asking for money from Toyota to deal with the problem.

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The scope of the problem with the faulty airbag inflators from Takata continues to broaden and is now reaching China, as well. Mazda is recalling 42,732 Mazda6 units there, produced by its local joint venture partner China FAW Car Company, to replace the front passenger airbags. It comes as part of Mazda's recall of nearly 160,000 vehicles worldwide, including about 34,600 in the US, according to Reuters.

ETC

The Chinese auto market is one of the most interesting in the world to look at. Its automakers appear to still be figuring things out and remain open to experimentation. For example, at this moment, you can buy new copies of all three generations of the Mazda6 from showrooms there.

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The Hongqi has arrived, and with it the greater hopes that powerful Chinese will ride in symbols of Chinese power. The Honqi L5 sedan produced by China's FAW Group, first unveiled last year (and called the L9 at the time), is - in some circles - intended to be among the homegrown replacements for the millions of foreign luxury cars the Chinese government purchases for important officials. Shown at this year's Beijing Motor Show in production guise and now available to civilians as well, a Chines

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Audi and its Chinese joint-venture partner FAW have announced that they'll be building a production version of the Audi A6 E-Tron Concept, shown at the 2012 Beijing Motor Show. Based on the China-only long-wheelbase A6, the plug-in-hybrid model is being targeted specifically at the People's Republic.

Shanghai

Hongqi means "Red Flag," and the sub-brand of Chinese automaker FAW was created in the 1950s to build cars for leaders of the nation known by its red flag. In those early days Hongqi designers took inspiration from what looks to be fifties Chevrolets; these days they've kept a little of the Chevrolet but look more the way of England. The L9 executive sedan about the length of a Rolls-Royce Phantom – on Mercedes S-Class-like wheels – and not much cheaper than the Rolls, to boot.

Official

FAW-Volkswagen, the China joint-venture that includes the giant German automaker, will begin testing lithium-ion batteries made by China BAK for use in upcoming electric vehicles.

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If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, the Chevrolet Volt can start to blush.

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Last week, major Chinese automaker First Automobile Works (FAW) rolled out its first batch of independently-developed alternative energy vehicles.

From the outside, China's upcoming Besturn B30 looks like an appropriately modern, cheap, and cheerful econocar. Under the modern skin, though, lurks the skeleton of the second-generation Volkswagen Jetta. That's right, China's newest widely-affordable small sedan is little more than a rebodied 30-year-old German sedan.

2010 Plug-in Prius Prototypes – Click above for high-res image gallery

Bertone Mantide - Click above for a high-res image gallery

Despite the lackluster sales from rival company BYD, Chinese automaker FAW has announced a new manufacturing plant that will specialize in building hybrid vehicles. Set to be completed in 2012, the automaker expects to build about 1,000 hybrid buses and 11,000 hybrid sedans per year at the new plant, which seems like a bit of a stretch for a company that had previously announced a steady plan to build hybrid in much smaller numbers (100 hybrid buses and 20 hybrid sedans in 2009, 200 hybrid buses

Click above for a gallery of the Chinese market VW Lingyu