Launch Edition 4dr Fastback
2021 Polestar 2

2021 2 Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
8.5

This is a dynamite car. Shocking speed, sublime handling, interesting design and plenty of comfort make this EV turn heads and raise pulses. Yes, we’d pick this over a Tesla Model 3.

Industry
8.5
The dog was patient enough as she waited for her human companion to finish his inquisitive orbit of the Polestar 2. The guy had no idea what it was. The badge, finished in the same paint as the rest of the car, was unknown. The car's name, appearing only on stickers on the front doors accompanied by "Battery Electric Vehicle," wasn't any more illuminating. "What the hell is a Polestar?" he was quite clearly pondering to himself. "And this is the sequel? What was the first?" And such will be your life should you take the plunge and bring home a Polestar 2. Be prepared to answer questions about this unknown mystery car you've bought. Yet unlike other startup electric car companies, of which there are many, Polestar isn't really a new thing. There's history behind it and a solid corporate foundation underfoot. Polestar was previously to Volvo what AMG is to Mercedes, a separate high-performance tuning firm eventually brought under the corporate wing. And while range-topping Volvos today wear the "Polestar Engineered" badge, the name has been applied to a new, all-electric, performance-oriented luxury brand. Its engineering and design facilities are adjacent to Volvo's in Gothenburg, Sweden; the cars are made in China, home to its parent company, Geely. The Volvo connection is best recognized in the Polestar 2's styling, most notably the Thor's Hammer headlight treatment. There's a much greater visual separation than was the case with the Polestar 1, which was essentially a coupe version of the Volvo S60 sedan, but there's certainly common DNA. In fact, the design started as a quirky concept for a new Volvo that was deemed too radical by company brass, only to be resurrected when Polestar CEO (and former Volvo design chief) Thomas Ingenlath sought something that could work for an entry-level Polestar. This, after the decision was made to make the brand more attainable and not like a Scandinavian Aston Martin as was originally planned. There's really nothing to indicate the Polestar 2 is powered solely by electricity, apart from those stickers (likely just for press vehicles) and an elevated ride height that not only provides a masses-pleasing whiff of crossover, but allows for the battery pack's under-floor placement. That pack, the only one available, has 75 kilowatt-hours of usable capacity (78 kWh gross total) and an EPA-estimated 233 miles of range. Efficiency is rated at 37 kWh hours per 100 miles. As just one comparative data point, the Mustang Mach-E AWD Extended Range I recently reviewed has the exact same efficiency rating, but an estimated 270 miles of range due to its bigger battery. Driven on the same driving route in similarly chilly conditions, I saw an effective driving range of 174.4 miles in the Polestar and 220.6 in the Mach-E – a bit wider than the EPA differential. In terms of efficiency, the Polestar 2 got 43.0 kWh/100 miles while the Mach-E got 39.9 kWh/100 miles. So, the Ford was more efficient. What's the deal? Well, besides the …
Full Review
The dog was patient enough as she waited for her human companion to finish his inquisitive orbit of the Polestar 2. The guy had no idea what it was. The badge, finished in the same paint as the rest of the car, was unknown. The car's name, appearing only on stickers on the front doors accompanied by "Battery Electric Vehicle," wasn't any more illuminating. "What the hell is a Polestar?" he was quite clearly pondering to himself. "And this is the sequel? What was the first?" And such will be your life should you take the plunge and bring home a Polestar 2. Be prepared to answer questions about this unknown mystery car you've bought. Yet unlike other startup electric car companies, of which there are many, Polestar isn't really a new thing. There's history behind it and a solid corporate foundation underfoot. Polestar was previously to Volvo what AMG is to Mercedes, a separate high-performance tuning firm eventually brought under the corporate wing. And while range-topping Volvos today wear the "Polestar Engineered" badge, the name has been applied to a new, all-electric, performance-oriented luxury brand. Its engineering and design facilities are adjacent to Volvo's in Gothenburg, Sweden; the cars are made in China, home to its parent company, Geely. The Volvo connection is best recognized in the Polestar 2's styling, most notably the Thor's Hammer headlight treatment. There's a much greater visual separation than was the case with the Polestar 1, which was essentially a coupe version of the Volvo S60 sedan, but there's certainly common DNA. In fact, the design started as a quirky concept for a new Volvo that was deemed too radical by company brass, only to be resurrected when Polestar CEO (and former Volvo design chief) Thomas Ingenlath sought something that could work for an entry-level Polestar. This, after the decision was made to make the brand more attainable and not like a Scandinavian Aston Martin as was originally planned. There's really nothing to indicate the Polestar 2 is powered solely by electricity, apart from those stickers (likely just for press vehicles) and an elevated ride height that not only provides a masses-pleasing whiff of crossover, but allows for the battery pack's under-floor placement. That pack, the only one available, has 75 kilowatt-hours of usable capacity (78 kWh gross total) and an EPA-estimated 233 miles of range. Efficiency is rated at 37 kWh hours per 100 miles. As just one comparative data point, the Mustang Mach-E AWD Extended Range I recently reviewed has the exact same efficiency rating, but an estimated 270 miles of range due to its bigger battery. Driven on the same driving route in similarly chilly conditions, I saw an effective driving range of 174.4 miles in the Polestar and 220.6 in the Mach-E – a bit wider than the EPA differential. In terms of efficiency, the Polestar 2 got 43.0 kWh/100 miles while the Mach-E got 39.9 kWh/100 miles. So, the Ford was more efficient. What's the deal? Well, besides the …
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Retail Price

$59,900 MSRP / Window Sticker Price
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Engine
MPG 96 City / 88 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 1-spd auto
Power 408 @ rpm
Drivetrain Instant Traction all wheel
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