Base AMG GT Coupe
2020 Mercedes-Benz AMG GT

2020 AMG GT Photos
Prodding the throttle of the 2020 Mercedes-AMG GT Coupe causes the rear end to instantly squirm around directly underneath. The tires scramble for grip, then catapult the car forward with a violent shove to the rear. In straight-line acceleration, it’s like sitting at the weighty end of a pendulum, the cockpit being the bob that controls exactly where that lengthy front end swings to. Yet, the GT is not unbalanced or unwieldy. That much is clear in the corners, but the forces exerted on your body and the way in which the AMG GT achieves speed is a unique experience in the sports car world. Plenty of cars have bountiful amounts of horsepower. Speed, if that’s all you want, comes cheap these days. You can spend about $40,000 on a Mustang GT that gets to 60 mph in the same time as this Mercedes-AMG GT Coupe — 3.9 seconds, so says Mercedes. Instead, the AMG GT separates itself from the pack in other ways. It starts with styling. There’s no bad angle — it is, in a word, timeless. And then when you stack Mercedes levels of luxury and modern tech on top of the stonking performance, you’re left with a car lacking in obvious downsides. None of the above is new information if you’ve driven or even read about an AMG GT before. However, there is plenty that’s new for the 2020 model year. Mercedes has given the entire AMG GT lineup a mid-life refresh, but we’ll be focusing on the bottom rung AMG GT in this review. Of course, with an as-tested price of $131,315, the bottom rung is rather high off the ground. Most of the updates for 2020 come on the tech and design side of things. The tech updates bring it in line with the AMG GT 4-Door Coupe (despite the name, barely mechanically related), adding a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster and 10.2-inch infotainment display. It had a traditional, analog gauge cluster and 8.4-inch infotainment system previously. Was it bad before? Absolutely not, but it only makes sense for Mercedes to apply its best technology to its very best sports car. You can even use Apple CarPlay and Android Auto now. The most noticeable style change you’ll see is the application of the large AMG Panamericana grille to the front end of the base car. With its thick, vertical chrome slats, it had previously been reserved for the higher GT C and GT R models. That was a mistake, as it's one of the few big grille designs that looks like it’s actually meant to be there. Adding it to the base car represents a massive, deserved step up in gravitas. Other, less obvious changes include new LED headlights, tinted taillights, redesigned side skirts, a new rear bumper and a redesigned quad exhaust. I adored the AMG GT’s design before, but these additions all work together to make it look even better. You end up turning heads everywhere you go. It turned mine every time …
Full Review
Prodding the throttle of the 2020 Mercedes-AMG GT Coupe causes the rear end to instantly squirm around directly underneath. The tires scramble for grip, then catapult the car forward with a violent shove to the rear. In straight-line acceleration, it’s like sitting at the weighty end of a pendulum, the cockpit being the bob that controls exactly where that lengthy front end swings to. Yet, the GT is not unbalanced or unwieldy. That much is clear in the corners, but the forces exerted on your body and the way in which the AMG GT achieves speed is a unique experience in the sports car world. Plenty of cars have bountiful amounts of horsepower. Speed, if that’s all you want, comes cheap these days. You can spend about $40,000 on a Mustang GT that gets to 60 mph in the same time as this Mercedes-AMG GT Coupe — 3.9 seconds, so says Mercedes. Instead, the AMG GT separates itself from the pack in other ways. It starts with styling. There’s no bad angle — it is, in a word, timeless. And then when you stack Mercedes levels of luxury and modern tech on top of the stonking performance, you’re left with a car lacking in obvious downsides. None of the above is new information if you’ve driven or even read about an AMG GT before. However, there is plenty that’s new for the 2020 model year. Mercedes has given the entire AMG GT lineup a mid-life refresh, but we’ll be focusing on the bottom rung AMG GT in this review. Of course, with an as-tested price of $131,315, the bottom rung is rather high off the ground. Most of the updates for 2020 come on the tech and design side of things. The tech updates bring it in line with the AMG GT 4-Door Coupe (despite the name, barely mechanically related), adding a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster and 10.2-inch infotainment display. It had a traditional, analog gauge cluster and 8.4-inch infotainment system previously. Was it bad before? Absolutely not, but it only makes sense for Mercedes to apply its best technology to its very best sports car. You can even use Apple CarPlay and Android Auto now. The most noticeable style change you’ll see is the application of the large AMG Panamericana grille to the front end of the base car. With its thick, vertical chrome slats, it had previously been reserved for the higher GT C and GT R models. That was a mistake, as it's one of the few big grille designs that looks like it’s actually meant to be there. Adding it to the base car represents a massive, deserved step up in gravitas. Other, less obvious changes include new LED headlights, tinted taillights, redesigned side skirts, a new rear bumper and a redesigned quad exhaust. I adored the AMG GT’s design before, but these additions all work together to make it look even better. You end up turning heads everywhere you go. It turned mine every time …
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Retail Price

$115,900 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$6,195 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 4.0L V-8
MPG 16 City / 22 Hwy
Seating 2 Passengers
Transmission 7-spd auto-shift man w/OD
Power 469 @ 6000 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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