Grand Touring 4dr All-wheel Drive
2020 Lincoln Aviator

2020 Aviator Photos
NAPA VALLEY, Calif. — While we've already declared that the 2020 Lincoln Aviator is the real deal, that earlier first drive only covered the gas-only base version. Not that a 400-horsepower anything is typically considered "base," but it certainly becomes that when there's another version available, the Aviator Grand Touring, that's good for a cool 494 horsepower and 630 pound-feet of torque.  Frankly, it seems a little odd to fixate on output figures when the Aviator goes out of its way to push its accelerative capability into the background and instead focus on an altogether luxurious and effortless driving experience. But 630 pound-feet is a whole heap of torque that fully eclipses even the mighty BMW X7 M50i. The BMW has a twin-turbo V8 engine fettled by M Division, however. The 2020 Aviator Grand Touring is a plug-in hybrid. Unlike other gasoline-electric variants, this version does not take a smaller engine and add electricity. Rather, it starts with the regular Aviator's whole hog 400-horsepower twin-turbo V6 and sandwiches a 75-kW electric motor between it and the 10-speed automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is standard, but it's a traditional system rather than one created by a rear-axle electric motor. With this approach, Lincoln is trying to create a range-topping model, not necessarily an eco-oriented one. The Grand Touring is the V12-powered Mercedes S600 to the regular Aviator's S500. It's best to think of it in those historic luxury terms, because despite the eye-popping output, this is still not a sport-tuned vehicle. Indeed, it's very possible that it's not actually that much quicker off the line than the regular version. [slideshow id='2163070'] Lincoln didn't provide a 0-60 time, but the Grand Touring weighs 781 pounds more than a gas-only all-wheel-drive Aviator. Stuffing 96 lithium-ion battery cells under the second-row seat tends to do that. As a result, the hybrid's added electric wallop does in fact make it feel more powerful, but it's not the sort of face-flattening experience you might expect with that torque number. It's not that different. Well, in terms of acceleration, at least. There are actually some drivability issues. The throttle is difficult to modulate smoothly from a start, at least when driving in hybrid mode with the plug-in battery portion fully drained. No matter how slowly and progressively we toe the pedal, there's a slight jerking as if the gasoline and electric motors aren't entirely getting along. The brake pedal is also a little bitey relative to the gas-only Aviator, which isn't unusual for a hybrid and is more easily acclimated to than the throttle. All that extra battery weight also negatively impacts the ride due to the need for firmer spring rates. Despite riding on smaller wheels than the gas-only Aviator we drove, the Grand Touring has a somewhat nervous ride that transmits little road imperfections into the cabin. Bigger bumps are still well managed by the optional road-sensing adaptive air suspension (we haven't sampled the standard adaptive dampers), but like Volvo's XC90, the Grand Touring has the …
Full Review
NAPA VALLEY, Calif. — While we've already declared that the 2020 Lincoln Aviator is the real deal, that earlier first drive only covered the gas-only base version. Not that a 400-horsepower anything is typically considered "base," but it certainly becomes that when there's another version available, the Aviator Grand Touring, that's good for a cool 494 horsepower and 630 pound-feet of torque.  Frankly, it seems a little odd to fixate on output figures when the Aviator goes out of its way to push its accelerative capability into the background and instead focus on an altogether luxurious and effortless driving experience. But 630 pound-feet is a whole heap of torque that fully eclipses even the mighty BMW X7 M50i. The BMW has a twin-turbo V8 engine fettled by M Division, however. The 2020 Aviator Grand Touring is a plug-in hybrid. Unlike other gasoline-electric variants, this version does not take a smaller engine and add electricity. Rather, it starts with the regular Aviator's whole hog 400-horsepower twin-turbo V6 and sandwiches a 75-kW electric motor between it and the 10-speed automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is standard, but it's a traditional system rather than one created by a rear-axle electric motor. With this approach, Lincoln is trying to create a range-topping model, not necessarily an eco-oriented one. The Grand Touring is the V12-powered Mercedes S600 to the regular Aviator's S500. It's best to think of it in those historic luxury terms, because despite the eye-popping output, this is still not a sport-tuned vehicle. Indeed, it's very possible that it's not actually that much quicker off the line than the regular version. [slideshow id='2163070'] Lincoln didn't provide a 0-60 time, but the Grand Touring weighs 781 pounds more than a gas-only all-wheel-drive Aviator. Stuffing 96 lithium-ion battery cells under the second-row seat tends to do that. As a result, the hybrid's added electric wallop does in fact make it feel more powerful, but it's not the sort of face-flattening experience you might expect with that torque number. It's not that different. Well, in terms of acceleration, at least. There are actually some drivability issues. The throttle is difficult to modulate smoothly from a start, at least when driving in hybrid mode with the plug-in battery portion fully drained. No matter how slowly and progressively we toe the pedal, there's a slight jerking as if the gasoline and electric motors aren't entirely getting along. The brake pedal is also a little bitey relative to the gas-only Aviator, which isn't unusual for a hybrid and is more easily acclimated to than the throttle. All that extra battery weight also negatively impacts the ride due to the need for firmer spring rates. Despite riding on smaller wheels than the gas-only Aviator we drove, the Grand Touring has a somewhat nervous ride that transmits little road imperfections into the cabin. Bigger bumps are still well managed by the optional road-sensing adaptive air suspension (we haven't sampled the standard adaptive dampers), but like Volvo's XC90, the Grand Touring has the …
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Retail Price

$68,800 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$399 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine V-6
MPG City / Hwy
Seating 6 Passengers
Transmission 10-spd w/OD
Power 494 @ rpm
Drivetrain all wheel
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