2019 Honda Accord

2019 Accord Photos
In a market that's rushing to fill every micro-segment or create new ones, let's consider a vehicle that offers a little of everything all in one package: the 2019 Honda Accord. What we love about the Accord is that the comfort-oriented trims work just as well as the sport- and economy-oriented trims – and that Honda has supported each with great powertrains, comfortable and easy-to-use interiors, and a healthy dose of style. It's refreshing to see a sensible pushback to the proliferation of niche models. The Accord's low, wide and imposing shape is further enhanced by tight sheetmetal folds and a lack of extraneous vents and grilles. To me, it looks like a Japanese take on the Dodge Charger – aggressive, athletic, but leaner and cleaner – and I love that. That's not to say it's a perfect design. Some of my colleagues aren't big fans of the fastback roofline, as well as the huge, shiny, upright grille. At least you can tone down the grille a bit with one of Honda's optional designs. The sheetmetal hides Honda's excellent turbocharged 2.0-liter 4-cylinder engine, an engine derived and detuned from the maniacal Civic Type R. It's admittedly not as melodious as Honda's lovely naturally aspirated V6s, but as far as inline-fours go, it's a silky one that emits an angry purr when caned. And when it isn't being driven hard, it's quiet and unobtrusive. Any loss in engine note is made up for by the engine's output. It makes 252 horsepower and an even more noteworthy 273 pound-feet of torque that comes on at just 1,500 rpm, meaning there's no waiting for boost. The power holds on through the mid-range before starting to ease up at the high end of the tachometer, but you'll never notice on your daily commute, and only barely notice on an enthusiastic backroad romp. Fuel economy comes in at 26 mpg combined for the Touring trim I tested, which is right on par with other high-output turbo and V6 engines in the class. If you care more about fuel economy than power, the Touring trim can be had with a hybrid powertrain that gets 48 mpg across the board. Back in our test car, the 2.0-liter engine is mated to a 10-speed automatic instead of the 1.5-liter engine's CVT. It's an excellent transmission that shifts seamlessly and quickly. It picks gears wisely too, meaning no hunting or multiple shifts to muddle the demands of your right foot. And if you're feeling friskier, there's a Sport mode that holds gears longer for more rpm and more excitement. There are shift paddles for manual gear selection, but it still automatically upshifts a few rpm shy of redline. Combined with its excellent automatic selection, it's best to just let it do its thing. If you really have to pick your own gears, the good news is that Honda does offer a six-speed manual on the lower Sport trim. It's available with either the 1.5-liter or 2.0-liter engines. It's a …
Full Review
In a market that's rushing to fill every micro-segment or create new ones, let's consider a vehicle that offers a little of everything all in one package: the 2019 Honda Accord. What we love about the Accord is that the comfort-oriented trims work just as well as the sport- and economy-oriented trims – and that Honda has supported each with great powertrains, comfortable and easy-to-use interiors, and a healthy dose of style. It's refreshing to see a sensible pushback to the proliferation of niche models. The Accord's low, wide and imposing shape is further enhanced by tight sheetmetal folds and a lack of extraneous vents and grilles. To me, it looks like a Japanese take on the Dodge Charger – aggressive, athletic, but leaner and cleaner – and I love that. That's not to say it's a perfect design. Some of my colleagues aren't big fans of the fastback roofline, as well as the huge, shiny, upright grille. At least you can tone down the grille a bit with one of Honda's optional designs. The sheetmetal hides Honda's excellent turbocharged 2.0-liter 4-cylinder engine, an engine derived and detuned from the maniacal Civic Type R. It's admittedly not as melodious as Honda's lovely naturally aspirated V6s, but as far as inline-fours go, it's a silky one that emits an angry purr when caned. And when it isn't being driven hard, it's quiet and unobtrusive. Any loss in engine note is made up for by the engine's output. It makes 252 horsepower and an even more noteworthy 273 pound-feet of torque that comes on at just 1,500 rpm, meaning there's no waiting for boost. The power holds on through the mid-range before starting to ease up at the high end of the tachometer, but you'll never notice on your daily commute, and only barely notice on an enthusiastic backroad romp. Fuel economy comes in at 26 mpg combined for the Touring trim I tested, which is right on par with other high-output turbo and V6 engines in the class. If you care more about fuel economy than power, the Touring trim can be had with a hybrid powertrain that gets 48 mpg across the board. Back in our test car, the 2.0-liter engine is mated to a 10-speed automatic instead of the 1.5-liter engine's CVT. It's an excellent transmission that shifts seamlessly and quickly. It picks gears wisely too, meaning no hunting or multiple shifts to muddle the demands of your right foot. And if you're feeling friskier, there's a Sport mode that holds gears longer for more rpm and more excitement. There are shift paddles for manual gear selection, but it still automatically upshifts a few rpm shy of redline. Combined with its excellent automatic selection, it's best to just let it do its thing. If you really have to pick your own gears, the good news is that Honda does offer a six-speed manual on the lower Sport trim. It's available with either the 1.5-liter or 2.0-liter engines. It's a …
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Retail Price

$23,720 - $35,950 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$1,919 - $2,524 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 1.5LI-4
MPG 30 City / 38 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 2-spd CVT w/OD
Power 192 @ 5500 rpm
Drivetrain front-wheel
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