Platinum 4x4 SuperCrew Cab Styleside 5.5 ft. box 145 in. WB
2015 Ford F-150

MSRP

$55,010
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings

N/A
EngineEngine 5.0LV-8
MPGMPG 15 City / 21 Hwy
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2015 F-150 Overview

UPDATE: Ford has responded to our inquiries for curb weights on all models and released figures for all models. You can see a chart in the gallery and our article below has been updated accordingly. To learn more about the all-new 2015 F-150 and get an early read on its potential hero-or-zero status, we flew to the heart of full-size pickup truck country, San Antonio, TX, to spend a day driving, towing and playing in the mud with an assortment of Ford's innovative new trucks. First, a caveat – while we feel we have a reasonably good handle on the new F-150 after attending this first-drive event, we are far from ready to pass definitive judgment on the success of this radically new rig. Our time in the various models was lamentably limited and we felt rushed. With so much at stake and with so much to talk about and experience, we had zero alone time with the vehicle – there were Ford folks shadowing us at every moment. With that disclaimer out of the way, let's get back to the elemental issue at hand: aluminum. Switching to this material is part bravery and part monumental risk. Ford's challenges stretch far beyond engineering, sourcing, manufacturing and cost control concerns to things like consumer acceptance, crash repair methodology and even insurance ramifications. The use of aluminum has never been attempted before on this scale, let alone in the hard-working pickup truck segment. There will be no bigger gamble in the auto industry this year from any manufacturer. The 2015 F-150 has the potential to be a game changer or, with a few subtle miscalculations, one of the biggest bungles in automotive history. The aluminum used in the F-150 is nothing like the material in a dent-prone Coke can. Let's get some potential misconceptions out of the way: first off, the metal used in the F-150 is nothing like the material in a dent-prone Coke can. Aluminum is offered in countless different grades based on its alloying elements and heat treatment and available in a variety of strengths. Done properly, it's tougher than steel and has many advantages – aluminum has about twice the strength-to-weight ratio, so panels can be thicker without adding weight or thinner while still retaining sturdiness. The metal is also highly resistant to corrosion, meaning rust should be less of a worry. And it's not a totally new material for Ford. Dearborn has used aluminum before in some of its vehicles (hoods, fenders, etc.), and remember, Ford was the parent company of Jaguar and Land Rover, British brands that have embraced the alloy in a big way. Thus it should come as no surprise that its engineers have the expertise to craft the entire truck's body and bed of several different grades, varying the thickness based on expected use and abuse. The aluminum isn't spot welded, it's bonded with structural adhesives and boron rivets – the same way aircraft are made. The resulting components are permanently mated and …
Full Review

2015 F-150 Overview

UPDATE: Ford has responded to our inquiries for curb weights on all models and released figures for all models. You can see a chart in the gallery and our article below has been updated accordingly. To learn more about the all-new 2015 F-150 and get an early read on its potential hero-or-zero status, we flew to the heart of full-size pickup truck country, San Antonio, TX, to spend a day driving, towing and playing in the mud with an assortment of Ford's innovative new trucks. First, a caveat – while we feel we have a reasonably good handle on the new F-150 after attending this first-drive event, we are far from ready to pass definitive judgment on the success of this radically new rig. Our time in the various models was lamentably limited and we felt rushed. With so much at stake and with so much to talk about and experience, we had zero alone time with the vehicle – there were Ford folks shadowing us at every moment. With that disclaimer out of the way, let's get back to the elemental issue at hand: aluminum. Switching to this material is part bravery and part monumental risk. Ford's challenges stretch far beyond engineering, sourcing, manufacturing and cost control concerns to things like consumer acceptance, crash repair methodology and even insurance ramifications. The use of aluminum has never been attempted before on this scale, let alone in the hard-working pickup truck segment. There will be no bigger gamble in the auto industry this year from any manufacturer. The 2015 F-150 has the potential to be a game changer or, with a few subtle miscalculations, one of the biggest bungles in automotive history. The aluminum used in the F-150 is nothing like the material in a dent-prone Coke can. Let's get some potential misconceptions out of the way: first off, the metal used in the F-150 is nothing like the material in a dent-prone Coke can. Aluminum is offered in countless different grades based on its alloying elements and heat treatment and available in a variety of strengths. Done properly, it's tougher than steel and has many advantages – aluminum has about twice the strength-to-weight ratio, so panels can be thicker without adding weight or thinner while still retaining sturdiness. The metal is also highly resistant to corrosion, meaning rust should be less of a worry. And it's not a totally new material for Ford. Dearborn has used aluminum before in some of its vehicles (hoods, fenders, etc.), and remember, Ford was the parent company of Jaguar and Land Rover, British brands that have embraced the alloy in a big way. Thus it should come as no surprise that its engineers have the expertise to craft the entire truck's body and bed of several different grades, varying the thickness based on expected use and abuse. The aluminum isn't spot welded, it's bonded with structural adhesives and boron rivets – the same way aircraft are made. The resulting components are permanently mated and …Hide Full Review