4.2 2dr All-wheel Drive quattro Coupe
2013 Audi RS 5

2013 RS 5 Photos

MSRP

$68,900
Quick Quote

Smart Buy Avg. Savings

N/A
 Engine 4.2LV-8
 MPG 16 City / 23 Hwy
 More View All Specs

2013 RS 5 Overview

The Audi RS5 is a bit of an odd duck in the brand's US lineup. At the moment it is one of only two RS models – the other being the TT RS – atop a pyramid of A and higher-performing S models. It is not, however, the brand's flagship performance model – not even close – that space being occupied by variants of the R8 supercar, specifically the V10 and GT models, and upcoming 560-horsepower RS7. The RS5 does, however, owe its beating heart to those ten-cylinder R8s, its own 4.2-liter V8 almost identical to those engines save for two fewer cylinders. Outside of the R8, then, the RS5 is the lone bastion of naturally aspirated V8 power in a brand that once happily shoved 4.2-liter V8s under any hood that they would fit. Today, not even the giant Q7 SUV offers a V8. Lastly, the RS5 is not new, except to us, having been on sale in Europe in coupe form the last couple of years. While Europeans were able to enjoy the hardtop two-door without us, the RS5 Cabriolet is reaching both peoples around the same time: now. We reviewed the RS5 coupe just recently, and having spent some time with the tin-top model myself as well, here is my take on the droptop version of what I consider one of Audi's most interesting models. Driving Notes West Coast Editor Michael Harley likened the RS5 coupe to a supermodel. The metaphor survives intact when driving around with the RS5 Cabriolet's top down – it's like walking around town with a topless supermodel on your arm. The attention this car receives is surprising considering most people don't blink twice at a standard A5 or S5. I received thumbs up, waves and shout-outs from kids on bikes, one grown man in an Escalade and an entire Burger King cook staff. This can partly be explained by the RS5's aggressive styling accoutrements that include wider fenders; 20-inch wheels housing attention-grabbing "wave" rotors; a giant, single-frame honeycomb grille; oversized air inlets and a noticeable rear diffuser. The other reason is that it's rare; only 1,200 RS5 coupes have been sold in the US since last summer, and the Cabriolet has only just arrived. Some argue that the RS5 isn't worth the extra $18,000 over the cost of an S5. The RS5 Cabriolet doesn't help itself in this regard with a base price of $77,900 – some $18,600 more than an S5 Cabriolet. This one was loaded up with the optional Estoril Blue crystal effect paint and black roof ($1,075), MMI Navigation plus package ($3,450), Driver Assist package with adaptive cruise control, dynamic steering and side assist ($3,250), Sport exhaust with black finishers ($1,000), 20-inch five-spoke wheels with summer tires ($1,000) and Matte-Aluminum Optic package ($750) for a grand total $88,425, not including an $895 destination charge. I don't buy the above argument that the RS5 fails to justify its price premium. That's what people who reach to afford an S5 …
Full Review

2013 RS 5 Overview

The Audi RS5 is a bit of an odd duck in the brand's US lineup. At the moment it is one of only two RS models – the other being the TT RS – atop a pyramid of A and higher-performing S models. It is not, however, the brand's flagship performance model – not even close – that space being occupied by variants of the R8 supercar, specifically the V10 and GT models, and upcoming 560-horsepower RS7. The RS5 does, however, owe its beating heart to those ten-cylinder R8s, its own 4.2-liter V8 almost identical to those engines save for two fewer cylinders. Outside of the R8, then, the RS5 is the lone bastion of naturally aspirated V8 power in a brand that once happily shoved 4.2-liter V8s under any hood that they would fit. Today, not even the giant Q7 SUV offers a V8. Lastly, the RS5 is not new, except to us, having been on sale in Europe in coupe form the last couple of years. While Europeans were able to enjoy the hardtop two-door without us, the RS5 Cabriolet is reaching both peoples around the same time: now. We reviewed the RS5 coupe just recently, and having spent some time with the tin-top model myself as well, here is my take on the droptop version of what I consider one of Audi's most interesting models. Driving Notes West Coast Editor Michael Harley likened the RS5 coupe to a supermodel. The metaphor survives intact when driving around with the RS5 Cabriolet's top down – it's like walking around town with a topless supermodel on your arm. The attention this car receives is surprising considering most people don't blink twice at a standard A5 or S5. I received thumbs up, waves and shout-outs from kids on bikes, one grown man in an Escalade and an entire Burger King cook staff. This can partly be explained by the RS5's aggressive styling accoutrements that include wider fenders; 20-inch wheels housing attention-grabbing "wave" rotors; a giant, single-frame honeycomb grille; oversized air inlets and a noticeable rear diffuser. The other reason is that it's rare; only 1,200 RS5 coupes have been sold in the US since last summer, and the Cabriolet has only just arrived. Some argue that the RS5 isn't worth the extra $18,000 over the cost of an S5. The RS5 Cabriolet doesn't help itself in this regard with a base price of $77,900 – some $18,600 more than an S5 Cabriolet. This one was loaded up with the optional Estoril Blue crystal effect paint and black roof ($1,075), MMI Navigation plus package ($3,450), Driver Assist package with adaptive cruise control, dynamic steering and side assist ($3,250), Sport exhaust with black finishers ($1,000), 20-inch five-spoke wheels with summer tires ($1,000) and Matte-Aluminum Optic package ($750) for a grand total $88,425, not including an $895 destination charge. I don't buy the above argument that the RS5 fails to justify its price premium. That's what people who reach to afford an S5 …Hide Full Review