GT 2dr Coupe
2012 Ford Mustang

MSRP ?

$29,710
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EngineEngine 5.0LV-8
MPGMPG 17 City / 26 Hwy
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2012 Mustang Overview

Making A Case Against Increasingly Excellent Factory Options The last time we drove a Roush Mustang – a 2010 427R – we declared that the company had set the bar for Mustang tuners around the country. But that was nearly two years ago. Since then, the pony car landscape has evolved immensely. Ford itself revamped the entire Mustang lineup, introducing the new 412-horsepower 5.0-liter V8 Mustang GT, dropped weight off the Shelby GT500 with a new aluminum block 5.4-liter V8 and successfully launched the track-ready, BMW M3-fighting Boss 302. Every Mustang that comes from the factory now offers more performance than ever, and a $50,000 aftermarket Mustang from a couple of years ago with a paltry 435 horsepower simply can't compete with an OEM-developed 'Stang. But Roush hasn't been sitting idly by. Its answer to hottest factory options from Ford comes in the form of the 2012 Stage 3 Mustang. Offering up 540 supercharged horsepower, a fresh look and Roush's legendary suspension tuning, the RS3 is perhaps the company's most appealing Mustang yet. But does it still have the magic of Roush's previous pony cars? The first thing you will notice about the RS3 is that it pretty much looks like every other Roush Mustang the company has offered in the few years. A subtle styling package that debuted in 2010 is still mostly in place for 2012, and it includes a new front fascia with driving lights, black billet grille, side splitters, rear spoiler and rear fascia. We used to think that the Roush's styling wasn't enough of a departure from the factory look, but after a few years, we've grown to appreciate the design's more mature and OEM-like appearance. The Roush Mustangs of 2005-2009 come off as far too "Boy Racer" today for our tastes. There are some small but thoughtful exterior changes with the RS3, including blacked-out graphics on the front bumper and rear decklid, and a new two-tone decals package on the front fenders and hood. Roush offers six different accent colors for both the stripe and accent colors, and with eight base vehicle colors to choose from, customers can pick from 288 color combinations. Three brake caliper colors and two wheel finishes are also available, so it's unlikely customers will find an identical Roush Mustang on the road. We especially liked the optional 20-inch "Hyper Black" wheels on our tester opposed to the standard chrome rollers. Inside, the Roush benefits from the Mustang's upgraded interior first seen in 2010. The soft-touch plastics on the dash and quality feel of most of the common touchpoints means the interior is still as pleasing as stock, although still not great for what is now a $50,000+ car. Even so, we wish that Roush would have done more with the cockpit. Most of the upgrades, like the Alcantara-trimmed seats and white-faced gauges, are merely different and not necessarily better than a stock Mustang rolling out of the Ford plant. We actually prefer the interior in the Shelby GT500, with …
Full Review

2012 Mustang Overview

Making A Case Against Increasingly Excellent Factory Options The last time we drove a Roush Mustang – a 2010 427R – we declared that the company had set the bar for Mustang tuners around the country. But that was nearly two years ago. Since then, the pony car landscape has evolved immensely. Ford itself revamped the entire Mustang lineup, introducing the new 412-horsepower 5.0-liter V8 Mustang GT, dropped weight off the Shelby GT500 with a new aluminum block 5.4-liter V8 and successfully launched the track-ready, BMW M3-fighting Boss 302. Every Mustang that comes from the factory now offers more performance than ever, and a $50,000 aftermarket Mustang from a couple of years ago with a paltry 435 horsepower simply can't compete with an OEM-developed 'Stang. But Roush hasn't been sitting idly by. Its answer to hottest factory options from Ford comes in the form of the 2012 Stage 3 Mustang. Offering up 540 supercharged horsepower, a fresh look and Roush's legendary suspension tuning, the RS3 is perhaps the company's most appealing Mustang yet. But does it still have the magic of Roush's previous pony cars? The first thing you will notice about the RS3 is that it pretty much looks like every other Roush Mustang the company has offered in the few years. A subtle styling package that debuted in 2010 is still mostly in place for 2012, and it includes a new front fascia with driving lights, black billet grille, side splitters, rear spoiler and rear fascia. We used to think that the Roush's styling wasn't enough of a departure from the factory look, but after a few years, we've grown to appreciate the design's more mature and OEM-like appearance. The Roush Mustangs of 2005-2009 come off as far too "Boy Racer" today for our tastes. There are some small but thoughtful exterior changes with the RS3, including blacked-out graphics on the front bumper and rear decklid, and a new two-tone decals package on the front fenders and hood. Roush offers six different accent colors for both the stripe and accent colors, and with eight base vehicle colors to choose from, customers can pick from 288 color combinations. Three brake caliper colors and two wheel finishes are also available, so it's unlikely customers will find an identical Roush Mustang on the road. We especially liked the optional 20-inch "Hyper Black" wheels on our tester opposed to the standard chrome rollers. Inside, the Roush benefits from the Mustang's upgraded interior first seen in 2010. The soft-touch plastics on the dash and quality feel of most of the common touchpoints means the interior is still as pleasing as stock, although still not great for what is now a $50,000+ car. Even so, we wish that Roush would have done more with the cockpit. Most of the upgrades, like the Alcantara-trimmed seats and white-faced gauges, are merely different and not necessarily better than a stock Mustang rolling out of the Ford plant. We actually prefer the interior in the Shelby GT500, with …Hide Full Review