ST 4x4 Regular Cab 140 in. WB
2010 Dodge Ram 1500

MSRP

$25,365
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Smart Buy Avg. Savings

N/A
EngineEngine 4.7LV-8
MPGMPG 13 City / 18 Hwy
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2010 Ram 1500 Overview

2010 Dodge Ram HD – Click above for high-res image gallery Back in 1993, truck drivers had no choice but to depend on domestic automakers for work-ready pickups, and only Ford and General Motors offered competitive haulers. That all changed a year later when Dodge set the pickup truck market on its leaf springs with the introduction of its all-new Ram. With a big-rig appearance thanks to an imposing front grille that looked ready to kick you in the Truck Nutz, Dodge's truck sales tripled inside of 12 months and gave load-hauling manly men a real alternative to Ford and Chevy. But while Dodge hit a home run with the 1994 Ram, the Penta-horned brand didn't have a heavy-duty option in its lineup until 2003, and an all-important diesel powerplant didn't come online until 2004. In 2008, Dodge filled out its pickup lineup with heavy-duty 4500 and 5500 variants, finally giving Chrysler's trucking arm the range of choices necessary to get plucky with the competition from Detroit and Dearborn. Last year, Dodge introduced a new light-duty Ram, with sleek updated aesthetics and controversial coil springs that provide a superior ride at the expense of some towing and hauling capability. Fast-forward a year and the truckmakers at Chrysler are set to unleash a new heavy-duty Ram that's been redesigned to provide customers more capability, more options and a better ride while competing against offerings from its crosstown rivals with a lower cost of entry. We headed out to Ann Arbor, MI to drive, tow, brake, climb and traverse in the new Ram HD to see if Chrysler's truck team has succeeded. Follow along with us after the jump. %Gallery-76575% Photos copyright ©2009 Chris Shunk / Weblogs, Inc. When it comes to passenger cars, it's difficult to discern exactly what your customer base is after. An automaker can make a sedan with good power and handling, fine interior appointments and tons of room for four adults, yet the final product can still go over like a herpes flare-up. Trucks are a bit different. If you can deliver rugged good looks; strong, usable power; plenty of storage and top-notch reliability, chances are customers are going to find you. After all, there were 1.6 million trucks sold in the U.S. last year; about one-in-eight of the total consumer-grade vehicles sold, so there's plenty of reward for a job done right. But the trick to nailing a top-notch pickup is working tirelessly with customers to figure out who buys trucks and how they're used, and the guys and gals at Dodge have it down to an exact science. How exact? Dodge's marketing team tells us that a typical truck buyer is a 55-year-old male, about 5' 11" and 203 pounds. There is a 67-percent chance that customer is going to have at least one dog (half the animal owners have two or more), and there's a 58-percent chance he tows a trailer. To cater to that core customer, every Dodge Ram HD comes with …
Full Review

2010 Ram 1500 Overview

2010 Dodge Ram HD – Click above for high-res image gallery Back in 1993, truck drivers had no choice but to depend on domestic automakers for work-ready pickups, and only Ford and General Motors offered competitive haulers. That all changed a year later when Dodge set the pickup truck market on its leaf springs with the introduction of its all-new Ram. With a big-rig appearance thanks to an imposing front grille that looked ready to kick you in the Truck Nutz, Dodge's truck sales tripled inside of 12 months and gave load-hauling manly men a real alternative to Ford and Chevy. But while Dodge hit a home run with the 1994 Ram, the Penta-horned brand didn't have a heavy-duty option in its lineup until 2003, and an all-important diesel powerplant didn't come online until 2004. In 2008, Dodge filled out its pickup lineup with heavy-duty 4500 and 5500 variants, finally giving Chrysler's trucking arm the range of choices necessary to get plucky with the competition from Detroit and Dearborn. Last year, Dodge introduced a new light-duty Ram, with sleek updated aesthetics and controversial coil springs that provide a superior ride at the expense of some towing and hauling capability. Fast-forward a year and the truckmakers at Chrysler are set to unleash a new heavy-duty Ram that's been redesigned to provide customers more capability, more options and a better ride while competing against offerings from its crosstown rivals with a lower cost of entry. We headed out to Ann Arbor, MI to drive, tow, brake, climb and traverse in the new Ram HD to see if Chrysler's truck team has succeeded. Follow along with us after the jump. %Gallery-76575% Photos copyright ©2009 Chris Shunk / Weblogs, Inc. When it comes to passenger cars, it's difficult to discern exactly what your customer base is after. An automaker can make a sedan with good power and handling, fine interior appointments and tons of room for four adults, yet the final product can still go over like a herpes flare-up. Trucks are a bit different. If you can deliver rugged good looks; strong, usable power; plenty of storage and top-notch reliability, chances are customers are going to find you. After all, there were 1.6 million trucks sold in the U.S. last year; about one-in-eight of the total consumer-grade vehicles sold, so there's plenty of reward for a job done right. But the trick to nailing a top-notch pickup is working tirelessly with customers to figure out who buys trucks and how they're used, and the guys and gals at Dodge have it down to an exact science. How exact? Dodge's marketing team tells us that a typical truck buyer is a 55-year-old male, about 5' 11" and 203 pounds. There is a 67-percent chance that customer is going to have at least one dog (half the animal owners have two or more), and there's a 58-percent chance he tows a trailer. To cater to that core customer, every Dodge Ram HD comes with …Hide Full Review