LT 4x4
2006 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

MSRP ?

$28,965
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N/A
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EngineEngine 4.2LI-6
MPGMPG 15 City / 21 Hwy
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2006 TrailBlazer Overview

Our time with the Chevrolet TrailBlazer SS is about to come to an end. With a thorough static examination of the vehicle completed (see Day 1, Day 2, and Day 3), it's time to get into this vehicle, wring it out in a variety of driving conditions, and find out if it's worthy of the Super Sport badge. Based on the comments that have been left in the first three posts of this review, it appears that a significant number of our readers are willing to pass judgment on this vehicle without putting rubber to the road. That's too bad, because this vehicle's best attributes are certainly not assessed while sitting still.   The days of single-dimensional performance are over, but the TrailBlazer SS makes no apologies for the fact that its roots lie solidly in the muscle car era. Tip into the first 10-percent or so of its electronically-controlled throttle, and one finds enough speed to keep up with nearly any traffic situation. There's very little in the way of exhaust rumblings or mechanical noise to indicate what's going on, just a steady clockwise sweep of the speedometer's needle. If the safety weenies of the world had their way, this amount of performance would be all we'd ever be allowed to experience. The next portion of travel - up to the halfway point or thereabouts, will leave 95-percent of your fellow drivers gratifyingly sucking spent gasses. The transmission doesn't readily offer up downshifts, but frankly it's generally not necessary to grab a lower gear. The big single exhaust system starts to assert itself at this point, and heads will turn. Venture past half-throttle, and the TrailBlazer SS leaps forward with a ferocity that defies most anyone's perception of what SUVs are capable of. The slushbox will finally snap down a gear or two, and the horizon suddenly becomes an immediate concern. Hitting gaps in traffic that would be unsafe (or downright impossible) in most vehicles becomes easy in the TBSS, and the deep roar of the exhaust alerts everyone in a three-block radius as to the siesmic activity occurring in the LS2's combustion chambers. As the tach jumps towards redline, upshifts are quick and smooth (although probably not snappy enough to be appealing to the TransGo customer base).   Dip into the loud pedal for too long, however, and there is a high likelihood of needing to drop anchor. That's where the TrailBlazer's big binders come in handy. While pedal feel is not among the best we've experienced and the level of power assist is a bit too high, the sheer effectiveness of the four disc setup is admirable. The ABS system holds off on doing its thing until the last possible moment, and doesn't result in exaggerated stopping distances when engaged. When speaking of this TrailBlazer's handling prowess, it's hardly necessary to use the "..for a SUV" disclaimer. The steering feel is just a bit on the numb side, but any movement of the wheel results in a corresponding change in direction. Even more importantly for building driver confidence is the SS' minimal …
Full Review

2006 TrailBlazer Overview

Our time with the Chevrolet TrailBlazer SS is about to come to an end. With a thorough static examination of the vehicle completed (see Day 1, Day 2, and Day 3), it's time to get into this vehicle, wring it out in a variety of driving conditions, and find out if it's worthy of the Super Sport badge. Based on the comments that have been left in the first three posts of this review, it appears that a significant number of our readers are willing to pass judgment on this vehicle without putting rubber to the road. That's too bad, because this vehicle's best attributes are certainly not assessed while sitting still.   The days of single-dimensional performance are over, but the TrailBlazer SS makes no apologies for the fact that its roots lie solidly in the muscle car era. Tip into the first 10-percent or so of its electronically-controlled throttle, and one finds enough speed to keep up with nearly any traffic situation. There's very little in the way of exhaust rumblings or mechanical noise to indicate what's going on, just a steady clockwise sweep of the speedometer's needle. If the safety weenies of the world had their way, this amount of performance would be all we'd ever be allowed to experience. The next portion of travel - up to the halfway point or thereabouts, will leave 95-percent of your fellow drivers gratifyingly sucking spent gasses. The transmission doesn't readily offer up downshifts, but frankly it's generally not necessary to grab a lower gear. The big single exhaust system starts to assert itself at this point, and heads will turn. Venture past half-throttle, and the TrailBlazer SS leaps forward with a ferocity that defies most anyone's perception of what SUVs are capable of. The slushbox will finally snap down a gear or two, and the horizon suddenly becomes an immediate concern. Hitting gaps in traffic that would be unsafe (or downright impossible) in most vehicles becomes easy in the TBSS, and the deep roar of the exhaust alerts everyone in a three-block radius as to the siesmic activity occurring in the LS2's combustion chambers. As the tach jumps towards redline, upshifts are quick and smooth (although probably not snappy enough to be appealing to the TransGo customer base).   Dip into the loud pedal for too long, however, and there is a high likelihood of needing to drop anchor. That's where the TrailBlazer's big binders come in handy. While pedal feel is not among the best we've experienced and the level of power assist is a bit too high, the sheer effectiveness of the four disc setup is admirable. The ABS system holds off on doing its thing until the last possible moment, and doesn't result in exaggerated stopping distances when engaged. When speaking of this TrailBlazer's handling prowess, it's hardly necessary to use the "..for a SUV" disclaimer. The steering feel is just a bit on the numb side, but any movement of the wheel results in a corresponding change in direction. Even more importantly for building driver confidence is the SS' minimal …Hide Full Review