• Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
  • Image Credit: SpiedBilde
We often see the name "Zora" bandied about when bouncing through the rumor mill of the mid-engine C8 Corvette. It's happening once more, because GM just filed to trademark "Zora" again this past December. The operative word here being "again," because this isn't the first time GM has made such a move.

In order to actually register the trademark, the company has to file a Statement of Use document. In 2014, GM filed an application for the Zora trademark but never submitted that document, so the trademark wasn't officially granted and put on the register. That's why, in 2018, GM had to file a new application. At the time of this writing, it hasn't submitted a Statement of Use document — if and when they do, it should be clear what the Zora name will actually be used for, since further explanation of the product is necessary for that doc. There's no rush for GM to show its hand in this situation, because they are allowed to file a Request for Extension of Time to file a Statement of Use. Extensions can be filed every six months for up to three years. This is a roundabout way of saying GM has a lot of time to use, or not use, the Zora name.

Historical context would have us believe that Zora is related to the upcoming mid-engine Corvette. We can assume the name is derived from the late Chevrolet engineer, Zora Arkus-Duntov. He passed in 1996, but was an outspoken advocate for making a mid-engine Corvette for many years.

What "Zora" actually ends up meaning for the mid-engine Vette is still highly speculative at this point. Just because GM files for the trademark like we see here, doesn't mean it's going to follow-up in the coming months (it didn't before). The trademark predictably pertains to "motor land vehicles, namely, automobiles." That leaves a whole lot up to our imaginations for what GM might have in mind for the name. There's still plenty of time left on the clock for the mid-engine halo GM car to materialize, and it might be longer than previously anticipated if the report from a few weeks ago about electrical issues is true.

GM has filed to secure the Zora name in multiples countries around the globe, so it's clear there's some heavy desire from GM to have the rights to it. We'll all be watching and waiting throughout 2019 to see if this is finally the year we see GM make the mid-engine Corvette official. All rumors point to a reveal sometime this year, so all this Zora nonsense will get cleared up soon.

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