• Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
  • Image Credit: Ford
In response to our First Drive review of the 2019 Ford Edge ST, commenter Luke wrote, "This makes me wonder if there is even room for an Edge RS at some point." He's not alone in pondering that hypothetical. During the media launch in Park City, Utah, Motor Trend asked Ed Krenz, chief functional engineer for Ford Performance, how he might work up an Edge RS. Krenz knew exactly what he'd do with what he called "a bit of a white space vehicle," that would "create kind of that segment of non-premium, ultra-high-performance SUVs."

Krenz laid out the easy part of the answer by reciting the recipe for every RS model. His team "would have to bring more power ... [and] additional vehicle dynamics." Everything below the belt would get a harder tune, resulting in "even more aggressive tires, more aggressive suspension setup, active dampers, torque vectoring."

The unexpected part of Krenz's answer came when he riffed on the idea of a manual transmission. Opening with the comical understatement, "I think there is definitely a manual transmission enthusiasts group," Krenz then noted how Ford has kept the manual torch alive in the Mustang, and that "the Fiesta and Focus STs traditionally have had that capability." He concluded by saying, "I think we're gonna learn a little bit, whether or not this segment really requires that." His mention of the Fiesta and Focus STs makes us wonder if he's only talking about a potential Edge RS model getting a standard gearbox, or if the Edge ST has some kind of moonshot chance at a manual if that clamorous enthusiasts group can make enough noise.

Motor Trend mooted Ford's 3.5-liter twin-turbo V6 as a possible power source for still-purely-fantasy Edge RS. That motor produces 375 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque in the Ford F-150, and 450 hp and 510 lb-ft in both the Ford F-150 SVT Raptor and Lincoln Navigator.

Based on Edge ST reviews, Ford might want to do a touch more honing to the present offering before taking a more powerful step. But say that happens, and the Edge ST earns its badge: Would a 450-hp, hardcore Edge RS follow-up — with a six-speed manual — put a little love in your hearts?

Related Video:


Share This Photo X