• Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  • Image Credit: Christopher McGraw
  •   Engine
    6.2L Supercharged V8
  •   Power
    707 HP / 645 LB-FT
  •   Transmission
    8-Speed Automatic
  •   0-60 Time
    3.5 Seconds
  •   Top Speed
    180 MPH
  •   Drivetrain
    All-Wheel Drive
  •   Curb Weight
    5,363
  •   Seating
    2+5
  •   Cargo
    68.3 CU-FT (max)
  •   MPG
    11 City / 17 Highway
  •   Base Price
    $86,995
  •   As Tested Price
    $99,965
Powered by the same supercharged Hemi at the heart of Dodge's Hellcat cars, the 2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk is the sort of vehicle that comes from a "Why not?" attitude from the maniacs at SRT. It's not for the faint of heart, nor for the cash-strapped. With 707 horsepower and 645 pound-feet of torque, it's capable of a 0-60 sprint of just 3.5 seconds. Its base price, however, is $86,995, though our tester's sticker totaled just a few bucks shy of $100,000.

Senior Editor, Green, John Beltz Snyder: "What business does a Jeep have going 0-60 in 3.5 seconds?" This was my thought as I merged into rainy rush-hour traffic on Woodward Avenue in the 2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk. "Why does an SUV need to have 'Track' in the name?" I thought as I unintentionally broke the tires loose pulling away from a stoplight. I hit the "Eco" button, but the Jeep still roared with every toe-tap, and still managed to gulp down nearly a quarter of a tank of gas on my ride home.

That sound, though, is amazing, and surely more unsettling to other drivers coming from such a big beast of a ute.

Anyway, this Jeep feels more grown-up than other Hemi-powered vehicles I've driven. The fit and finish in this $99,000 Jeep is far nicer than, say, the Dodge Durango SRT (though at a much higher cost). If another driver didn't pay close attention to the badging, they might see this and think it just another Jeep. The sound, though, will give it away every time.

Associate Editor Joel Stocksdale: If Fiat-Chrysler knows how to do anything, it's making fast SUVs, and the Grand Cherokee Trackhawk is further proof of that. And by that I mean, they know how to make them fast, and they know how to make them pleasant to drive.

The Trackhawk definitely handles the fast part better than its SRT Durango and SRT Grand Cherokee cousins, what with its extra 230-odd horsepower. This big beast seriously rockets when you punch the throttle. The nose rises up, the supercharger screams, the exhaust rumbles and the speedometer ticks up much faster than you'd ever think. And it feels strong at all revs. Also impressive is that you don't have to really think when flooring it. The all-wheel-drive and fat tires offer so much grip the Jeep simply goes.

The pleasant to drive part comes in the fact that the Trackhawk is very comfortable. The suspension has plenty of give, providing a good ride over pockmarked Motown roads. But it still handles well, if perhaps not quite up to the standards of European super SUVs. But the thing is, no SUV is going to have sports car handling, so the tradeoff toward a bit more comfort is welcomed. Adding to the good suspension are wide, bolstered, well-padded seats that should be excellent for long-trips. The UConnect is easy to use, and there's plenty of space inside. It's a great all-around SUV, and it just happens to go extremely fast.

Editor-in-Chief Greg Migliore: I was psyched to drive the Trackhawk. It's one of the most anticipated Jeeps ever — and it totally lived up to the hype. Obviously, the Hellcat engine is the spotlight feature, and it's well-suited to the Grand Cherokee. That was the part I was curious about. It didn't seem like a logical fit, but everything is well-tuned and sorted. It sounds good, yet not overdone. It's also a sleeper vehicle. Yes, something is up with this Jeep. You can tell that at first glance. But Hellcat power isn't immediately obvious. I like that. It's also pretty chill when you're cruising at steady speeds.

Inside, I wasn't a fan of this maroon leather. Otherwise, the FCA U.S. controls and infotainment remain among the best in the industry. The touchscreens work, and the knobs and buttons are intuitive. Can't ask for more. Also, many years into its lifecycle, the Grand Cherokee remains a strong, attractive player in its segment. Giving it the Trackhawk treatment wasn't necessary, but I'm sure glad FCA did.

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