• Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
  • Image Credit: Copyright 2016 Brandon Turkus / AOL
Update: Updates the story to include Chevrolet's response.

Citizens of Massachusetts, Maryland, and Virginia? You're next. Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicles became available to order through dealerships in December, according to Green Car Reports. And that's where those cars will start appearing on showroom lots next month.

Chevy provided a schedule to GCR detailing the two-month lag between when prospective customers can order from dealers and when the cars will be in those dealerships. That means that this month, New York and New Jersey residents are getting the proverbial green lights for Bolt orders, which will be in those states' dealers in March. Washington State gets added to that order-availability list next month. Chevrolet spokesman Fred Ligouri confirmed the schedule to Autoblog on Tuesday afternoon..

Things will really start heating up in time for summer, though. By May, 18 states will have ordering eligibility. That means states like Connecticut, Colorado, Illinois, Florida, and Pennsylvania will start seeing showroom-bound Bolts in July. Customers will be able to order from all 50 states by July, and dealerships in all states will have those cars in September.

General Motors' first mass-produced electric vehicle started orders in California and Oregon in October, and began ringing up official sales last month. In December, GM moved 579 units of the new model.

In November, the Bolt won the 2017 Green Car of the Year by Green Car Journal, and last year, Kelley Blue Book analyst Karl Brauer forecast that the Bolt could move anywhere between 30,000 and 80,000 units during its first year of production. To put those numbers into context, Nissan sold about 14,000 Leaf EVs in the US last year (to be fair, it was a down year for the model), while Chevy moved almost 25,000 of its Volt extended-range plug-in vehicles. And Tesla Motors delivered 76,230 of its Model S and Model X electric vehicles globally last year.

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