• Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
  • Image Credit: KGP Photography
Car magazine has put a couple more outrageous numbers to the automobile expected to be called the Bugatti Chiron in honor of Monegasque racing driver Louis Chiron. We've already been looking forward to a 25-percent jump in output to 1,500 horsepower compared to the final-run Vitesse coupes; Car says that the torque target is 1,106 pound-feet, which would be unchanged from the last Veyron models.

Those numbers will put indisputable distance between the Chiron and the trio of supercars that have surrounded it. They could also allow the Chiron to do the 0-100 km/hr run - note, 62 mph, not 60 mph - in 2.0 seconds. That would be four-tenths of a second under the Vitesse models, and would put the Bugatti more than 0.6 seconds ahead of the McLaren P1, more than 0.5 seconds ahead of the Porsche 918 with the Weissach Package, and more than 0.5 seconds ahead of the Ferrari LaFerrari. There has been talk about "lighter weight" and "more nimble handling," but sticking with the basic Veyron form, even when 92 percent of the components are said to be new or revised, means we shouldn't expect miracles.

But big changes are being made to make the Chiron kinder in urban environments, and that will include gas mileage. Our own EPA gave the Veyron a rating of 10 miles per gallon combined, Car says the Chiron is going after 14 mpg with those electric turbos as well as regular old luxury car tech like cylinder deactivation and economy car tech like direct injection. We wonder if the recent departure of Volkswagen Group Chairman Ferdinand Piëch, father of the Veyron, will end up making more changes to the car; he was the one who delayed its arrival to next year because he wanted more done to it. At the moment, we're apparently looking at a kinder, gentler Bugatti that will slay everything - in a straight line, at least.

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