The battle to claim October's best-selling compact sedan title has been won by the Honda Civic. The Japanese four-door sold 27,328 units, leaving the Toyota Corolla - September's title holder - in its wake with 23,637 units sold. In terms of year-to-date sales, the Civic sits at 280,899 units, with the Corolla trailing at 257,184 vehicles.

Sitting in third place, separated by a significant gap from the leaders, is the Chevrolet Cruze with 16,087 units sold. The Ford Focus earned fourth, with 15,108 units moved out of showrooms. (It is interesting to note that while the Civic and Corolla have both enjoyed double-digit sales increases year-over-year, the Cruze and Focus have seen significant decreases during the same period.)

Sales of the Hyundai Elantra hit 14,876 units, putting it in fifth place, with the Volkswagen Jetta earning sixth place with 11,710 units. Rounding out the ten top sellers were the Nissan Sentra (8,399 units), Mazda3 (7,647 units), Dodge Dart (5,617 units) and Subaru Impreza/WRX (4,923 units). The Kia Forte (4,706 units) and Volkswagen Golf (2,249 units), eleventh and twelfth respectively, have fallen behind.

For complete US auto sales coverage, be sure to check out our By the Numbers articles, which we run at the end of every month.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 127 Comments
      cpmanx
      • 1 Year Ago
      YTD is the number that matters. Month to month the numbers are highly volatile in this segment--so why doesn't AB give the relevant numbers for all the cars listed? The Civic might not be the best compact out there but it is leagues better than the Corolla (I just suffered through one as a rental). I'm glad to see it moving ahead.
      NightFlight
      • 1 Year Ago
      That's a whole lot of boring vehicles. There are much better choices in the C segment than the Corolla and Civic.
        thequebecerinfrance
        • 1 Year Ago
        @NightFlight
        Reliability wise these are the best cars. And for a lot of people that's all that matters. Personally I would take the Mazda3.
          NightFlight
          • 1 Year Ago
          @thequebecerinfrance
          @ thequebecerinfrance "Lot's of engine issues" with the 2.3? Yeah, okay. Let's see your source.
          thequebecerinfrance
          • 1 Year Ago
          @thequebecerinfrance
          Mazda is not as reliable as Toyota and Honda. They still have a lot of work before they do.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        MJC
        • 1 Year Ago
        Wrong, as always. The 2012 sold incredibly well despite its shortcomings.
        • 1 Year Ago
        [blocked]
        flammablewater
        • 1 Year Ago
        "Autoblog loves Honda" "Autoblog loves Hyundai" "Autoblog hates imports" god stop it already. They report on cars. All cars. Not only the ones you love.
        MJC
        • 1 Year Ago
        Also, your second paragraph makes absolutely no sense.
        superchan7
        • 1 Year Ago
        Sales of the 2012 were up over 2011. Try again.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
        piggybox
        • 1 Year Ago
        Shouldn't Ford just be honest and put a 4k less MSRP directly?
        Rob
        • 1 Year Ago
        In the past that was correct but the Civic is now discounted heavily and very aggressive lease deals are in place. Civic is a decent car but it is no longer the benchmark for the C segment.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        If you can only get 500 off the sticker of any new vehicle you need to brush up on your car buying/negotiating skills.
        Gator
        • 1 Year Ago
        You are very wrong. Honda dealers are high volume and always cut atleast 2k off the MSRP.
      Matt
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's sad that these two are still the best sellers. Do people just not do their research when buying new cars and just buy the same car they bought in the 90's? I'd much rather have a Focus or Cruze Diesel over either of these two.
        carlotta
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Matt
        Actually, maybe the people who buy the Civic and Corolla are more sophisticated than people who buy Foci and Cruzes. After all, there is a proven track record and the Focus especially has been a poor choice as a vehicular investment compared to either.
          merlot066
          • 1 Year Ago
          @carlotta
          The Focus has one of the lowest 5-year cost-to-own totals in the segment (KBB) and has consistently been at the same level as the Civic for reliability (JD Powers).
        404 not found
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Matt
        Don't see what's so sad about it. Nothing wrong with the Civic or Corolla. They do their job well and they sell well.
          Jesus!
          • 1 Year Ago
          @404 not found
          Both are ancient even with refreshes. Both are ugly inside and out. Shall I go on?
          Matt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @404 not found
          Not from my experience. My parents own a 2009 civic with just over 60,000 miles on it and it already burns about a Quart of oil every thousand miles. They do their maintenence very religiously too :p
        bubba_roe
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Matt
        some people arnt domestic fanbois.
      rcavaretti
      • 1 Year Ago
      Those are compact cars? Some of them weigh about 3000 lbs. The people who classify size have lost perspective.
      MJC
      • 1 Year Ago
      Apparently people have figured out that there is no reason to buy a Toyota, when every comparable Honda is a more competitive vehicle. The Camry is going down next...in the Northeast US, I see about 10 new Accords for every new Camry.
        jtav2002
        • 1 Year Ago
        @MJC
        But by that logic, people should have no reason to buy any car that's not perceived as being the best of it's respective class. Many times the vehicle that gets the highest praise isn't even the best seller. The word "competitive" or "uncompetitive" is a good term for the enthusiast to throw around comparing spec sheets, but to the average buyer that accounts for most of the auto buying population, what really makes one vehicle that much more competitive than the other? One vehicle might get a couple more mpg here, another might be faster, another might offer a feature that another doesn't. The better deal and personal preference on styling is going to go a lot further in getting a buyer than a couple digits on a spec sheet. Since you mention the Camry, I know a couple people who recently bought new ones, both cross against a similarly equipped Accord. The decisions were ultimately made on which salesman would go the lowest.
        Moz
        • 1 Year Ago
        @MJC
        Like many people, we bought the 2007-2011 Camry and it was atrocious in terms of fit and finish and driving stability. Every time I brake or turn, the chassis flexes and the door seals creak, the dashboard creaks. Terrible.. When it was time to replace our 1996 Camry, we test drove everything and loved the Accord so much more. Not only was it going to be reliable, it felt solid and almost Germanic compared to the Camry. We bought one and loved it so much, six months later we bought another. Accord is the way to go. The MPG we get is great on the highway (33 combined for both of them as calculated by the on-trip computer).
          Jesus!
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Moz
          Sure hope you have a solid transmission. Honda is not known for them.
          superchan7
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Moz
          IIRC, Honda AT failure issue was mostly gone by 2004-5.
      ELG
      • 1 Year Ago
      honda has learned the toyota recipe for sales success: the crappier you make your cars, the more dumb americans buy them.
      eye.surgeon
      • 1 Year Ago
      I bought a 2012 Civic for my teenage daughter. We test drove all the competition and I expected to dislike the civic because of all the hand-wringing in the press about how terrible it was. Within 2 minutes of driving it we both came to the same conclusion.The reality is the automotive press and the buying public have very different priorities. I'm not interested in the shiniest newest most loaded with features car for my daughter. I want solid proven reliable transportation. She doesn't give a crap about driving dynamics. She hates driving my E46 M3. The residuals on that 2012 are currently at 58%, the highest in the segment by far. The press darlings in the segment are all lower than 50.
        Terry Actill
        • 1 Year Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        Hit the nail on the head. The auto magazines emphasize the thrill of going sideways in a vehicle when in real life if you went sideways there would be an accident. People for the most part drive to get from A-B safely in hopefully an economical and reliable vehicle and could not care less about 90% of what the auto press care about. Cars are transport and people need to move. If you want to drive for pleasure you have your options too.
          john96xlt
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Terry Actill
          But why drive something with the personality of a dishwasher when you could actually ENJOY your commute?
        Cayman
        • 1 Year Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        FWIW, if she prefers driving a Honda Civic over a BMW M3 then we probably shouldn't put too much stock in her automotive preferences. And she's probably fine with that.
          eye.surgeon
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Cayman
          I would venture to say most of the driving public would prefer commuting in a Civic vs my E46 M3 with the competition pkg and a 5 speed. As for the driving pleasure of previous civics, I drove an 87 in high school and it was very competent but hardly dynamic. I think we wax nostalgic somewhat about the historic driving characteristics of the civic. It's alway had basic neutral commuter-biased handling outside of the Si.
        bK
        • 1 Year Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        Exactly, People are spoiled these days, got their priorities all messed up. They "expect" way too much for a already great car that drives well.
        superchan7
        • 1 Year Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        I still think there's value in keeping the Civic "interesting" to buyers. Honda spent a few hundred bucks per unit for the 2013 model year, and the results were impressive even to the journalists. I think the company honestly believes in selling quality products, even though the accountants tried their best to get in the way sometimes. I can't fault the media for blasting the 2012. It's their job to bring to attention the plusses and minuses of everything they see, and what they saw was a Corolla-fication of the Civic. Not that sales were affected or that it was at all a bad car, but Honda felt it worthwhile to erase those "perceived" problems from the 2013 model. Regardless, the Civic retains its strong lead over the Corolla in every aspect of performance, features and quality. One thing that absolutely surprised me was the inclusion of a rear camera on ALL US models......just wow. The sales success is well-deserved.
        Ok
        • 1 Year Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        Perhaps the average driver doesn't care much about driving dynamics, but the 2012 was also knocked for being noisy. I'd expect that is something people care about.
          eye.surgeon
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Ok
          It's actually quieter than the previous generation. Another example of the echo chamber of the automotive press. My opinion, the consumer reports review got so much ink that others in the press were afraid to disagree.
        hadskeath
        • 1 Year Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        Nobody had a problem with the 12 models. Everyone agrees that was a great car. It's the newer ones that have people griping.
      dovegraybird
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am not understanding the flack these two cars receive. Kudos to Toyota and Honda for naming a car and than leaving it alone. These two have got to be some of the oldest nameplates still made, which does have something to do with popularity. Common sense says that people would at least feel any mistakes that were made were not so bad they had to re name their vehicles so the public might forget a brands screw up (looking at you GM). This segment are mainly used as commuters. Commuting isn't driving. Commuting isn't fun. Personally I think the Mazda3 is best in class, but does the driving dynamic mean much when doing 2 to 8 mph in the parking lot of life known as rush hour twice a day, probably not. When I sold years ago people bought cause it "felt right". A woman couldn't stand red dash lights, guy needed a comfortable seat, the wheels were cool, would the interior hide dog hair? More than once I sold "The shiny one out front, under the lights". My opinion didnt matter, it was their money. If Civic and Corolla have the right combo to be number 1 and number 2 in the segment I say good for them.
      Moz
      • 1 Year Ago
      Probably because the Civic's transaction prices are a lot cheaper than the Corolla's, and there are better discounts off MSRP. Corolla is brand new right now and dealers are sticking near MSRP. That and the Corolla looks like a turd and was damned with faint praise by the critics.
        MJC
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Moz
        Not true. Civics have a higher average price and almost never have cash incentives. The new Corolla is already heavily incentivized, like nearly every other Toyota product. Most people can walk in and get a Corolla at dealer cost and 0% long-term financing.
        suthrn2nr
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Moz
        Corolla always sold well and critics have always disliked it, so I don't think this had much of an impact. If these customers cared about journalists opinions or about sportiness they would be buying Mazda 3's.
      Victor Hoyles
      • 1 Year Ago
      Corolla's are sold to people that need transportation and nothing else. It's the same people that buy Maytag appliances because they are perceived to be reliable and do nothing more than wash your clothes. Nothing more, nothing less.
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