It's an increasingly turbocharged world out there. At least according to Honeywell, one of the major automotive suppliers for turbochargers around the world. And it's easy to understand why – as fuel mileage requirements are increasing, engine sizes are decreasing. To continue offering the power levels to which modern automotive buyers have come to expect, forced induction offers a ready solution.

Just how many turbochargers are we talking? Last year, Honeywell claims that turbocharged passenger vehicles accounted for 25 percent of the global market, for a total of 20 million vehicles. By 2017, says the report, that number will swell to 36 million new vehicles, which would be about 40 percent of global sales.

In other words, it's time to get used to seeing those exhaust-driven snail-shaped spools under the hood of new cars.


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  • 51 Comments
      KaiserWilhelm
      • 2 Years Ago
      I, for one, welcome our new turbocharged overlords. Boost and torque be praised!
      ELG
      • 2 Years Ago
      air goes in here, witchcraft happens, and you go faster
      Boost Retard
      • 2 Years Ago
      Boost...it's what's for dinner!
      foxtrot685
      • 2 Years Ago
      We just traded our Murano in for a Chevy Cruze 2LT 6 M/T and the 1.4T and I must say, turbochargers have come a long way from the days of my Neon SRT4. Its much refined and I love the large vat of torque in the midrange for hill climbing and passing!
      MotionDesigner
      • 2 Years Ago
      It wasn't so long ago when having a turbocharged car was cool... something of a novelty and bragging right. Now they are offering a turbo trim on almost every model. I'm not complaining, just sayin...
      AnalogJesse
      • 2 Years Ago
      Good. I can't wait for a sequential tri-turbo engine. That thing would sound insane.
      George of the Garage
      • 2 Years Ago
      Ain't nothin wrong with being blown
      Mercennarius
      • 2 Years Ago
      I'll take forced induction over more displacement any day.
      suseboxcardude
      • 2 Years Ago
      The thing people overlook with the turbo vs displacement argument is a turbo is forcing pressurized air into a smaller displacement, effectively giving you the same volume of oxygen within the engine as a comparably larger NA engine. The increased amount of oxygen also has to be matched with an increase of fuel to maintain proper air/fuel ratios and avoid running lean. Fuel efficiency while driving within "boost" actually nets fairly poor mileage. Awful in the case of modified cars.
        montoym
        • 2 Years Ago
        @suseboxcardude
        Well, it's not really overlooked per se, it's really more a matter of people not being "within boost" all that often. The vast majority of driving is done at more sedate levels and it's all that time that benefits from the smaller displacement of the turbo engine as compared to a similarly powerful, larger N/A engine. Largely though, I agree with you. I've been preaching the same thing about what a turbo really does and how it affects fuel mileage. Basically, it comes down to one simple thing. It takes X amount of fuel and Y amount of air to make Z amount of power, regardless of engine size.
      Vinuuz
      • 2 Years Ago
      Long term reliability of the turbo's (that are going extremely mainstream now) is still very sketchy. Ford's ecoboost and BMW 3.0 twin turbo related issues are testimony to the fact. However as the development goes on, we should have better reliability on the turbos. Right now, turbo + engineering reliability of older NA type engines is not a combination that works well.
        prighello
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Vinuuz
        Not really. My PT Cruiser GT had a 100K on it with no engine problems. Had the compression checked and it came back at near factory new figures. The rest of the car was crap, but the turbo motor was rock solid. SRT4 guys will say the same (stock).
          mitytitywhitey
          • 2 Years Ago
          @prighello
          Agree. Even the 5v Audi biturbo engines were tough, even though their transmissions and suspensions would break far sooner than the engines.
          gtv4rudy
          • 2 Years Ago
          @prighello
          'Maintenace' is the key word when your engine is turbocharged.
          Vinuuz
          • 2 Years Ago
          @prighello
          Agreed. But not every manufacturers iteration is there as yet. So I would think turbo tech needs another 10 years of evolution to be at par with Naturally aspirated models on reliability. The components have to survive through a lot more heat and stress than normally aspirated models.
      Hazdaz
      • 2 Years Ago
      American are finally discovering what the rest of the world knew decades ago. Namely that there is a replacement for displacement and it comes in the form of a turbocharger that can get you better mileage when not in the boost, and yet when in the boost, can give you similar power levels to a larger engine. It only took the US auto industry to go to the brink of ruin, and for them to get pushed and prodded into more efficient cars for them to FINALLY bring here technology that they themselves had used for a long time overseas.
        rlog100
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        The problem with a Turbo, if leverage that power, you're just pissing away gas. Your mileage would be better with a six cylinder non-turbo. Turbos are cycle beaters. Drive like a grandma, you'll score a decent number for fuel economy. Drive like you have somewhere to be and you'll never realize that number.
        The_Zachalope
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        Ford had the technology in the 80's, and the market poo poo'd them. There were turbos available in the EXP, Thunderbird, and Mustang, but the sales were mediocre at best.
      Georg
      • 2 Years Ago
      went from small displacement overpowered Turbo engine to a oldschool US icon LS3 V8 ... never will go back... more power, more usefull power, better throttle respons, no turbo lag, my litte 4banger turbo only recived good mpg if driven under 3000rpm all the time, never flooreing the throttle... on a race track the mpg went down to 9.8mpg, with the LS3 the worst I reached so far was 14.6mpg on the Autobahn on the other hands during a relaxed trip through the country side I had no problems to reach 21-23mpg. There is NO replacment for displacment...and never will. all the best from Germany
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Georg
        [blocked]
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Georg
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        • 2 Years Ago
        @Georg
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