It was just a few months ago that Nissan announced it had sold over 10,000 all-electric Leaf electric cars around the world. Speaking before the start of the Tokyo Motor Show today, company officials confirmed to Autoblog that the automaker has sold over 20,000 Leafs since the electric car went on sale in December of 2010.

Of that total, over 60 percent of the roughly 9,000 Leafs sold in the U.S. so far this year (we'll get specific numbers later this week) have found homes in California. Furthermore, Nissan is on track to eclipse 10,000 Leafs sold in the U.S. by the end of the year – perfectly in line with what the automaker expected.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 42 Comments
      Alex Ko
      • 3 Years Ago
      Shouldn't it be "20,000 Leaves"? j/k
      Daniel
      • 3 Years Ago
      I live in Nashville (home of Nissan's US headquarters), and see 3 or 4 of these on the road every day. There always are at least 2 parked at any charging station, no matter how obscure the location (all Cracker Barrels have charging stations now). If 60 percent are in California, 30 percent must be in Tennessee.
        DrEvil
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Daniel
        True, because the only one I have ever seen was at the NY auto show back in April.
      DrEvil
      • 3 Years Ago
      Now that there is a sincere effort out there with electrics, I'm giving OPEC 5 - 7 years, before there is an all-out price war. Pass the popcorn, I want a ringside seat to this fight.
      Alex740
      • 3 Years Ago
      As a 2nd car for around town errands these make perfect sense, I'm just waiting for the tech to improve a little more and the price to come down. Glad to see the early adopters are doing their part.
      AddLightness
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is great to hear! I love electric cars.. and if I didn't drive just a few miles everyday and have to deal with crazy winters, I would without question invest in one, like the Model S :) For now I'll stick with my 2010 F-150 4x4 (I was the only person who made it to work after a blizzard last year lol) and get a second car when its paid off. Besides, these cars will evolve so fast I might as well wait a little bit.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      TopGun
      • 3 Years Ago
      I don't get it. This car is less than half of the car the Volt is. Maybe people have 2nd or 3rd cars so this truly becomes a short trip round-about.
        aatbloke1967
        • 3 Years Ago
        @TopGun
        Of course it's going to be used as a secondary car, for urban work. Common sense is unbelievably lacking on these forums.
          aatbloke1967
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          lamazing ... not only do you not read my posts, you then have the gall to state I'm divorced from reality. The REALITY is that people looking to purchase an extended range hybrid like the Volt or plug-in Prius for their needs will NOT consider an EV like the Leaf. The Leaf, as with all EVs, is designed simply for emissions-free urban chores. Sure, no EV has cross-continental ability, but the technology is brand new and that sort of work is not what these vehicles are designed for. There's a huge difference in price between the Volt and the Leaf, and they are considered for very different reasons based on personal needs. For Nissan to have sold 20,000 of them is testament to the EV in general, not just Nissan.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          [blocked]
        Temple
        • 3 Years Ago
        @TopGun
        This car is $32k, the Volt is $41k; both before tax rebates. For folks spending $40k, they probably already have another car for long-trips that is more comfortable and practical than either the Leaf or Volt. They are buying the Volt and Leaf because its environmental and want to run it in EV mode. The Leaf offers a longer range at a lower cost. They don't need or want either the Leaf/Volt to be their only car.
          otiswild
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Temple
          Difference is, the Volt _can_ be your only car (and in my case, it basically is), while the Leaf in many if not most cases cannot.
          aatbloke1967
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Temple
          "Difference is, the Volt _can_ be your only car (and in my case, it basically is), while the Leaf in many if not most cases cannot." And in the real world, most people spending $40K on a car would generally have more than one vehicle in the household. People with common sense wouldn't contemplate a Leaf or any other EV if they were to rely on it as their only vehicle.
      reattadudes
      • 3 Years Ago
      I couldn't even drive one of these home from my nearest Nissan dealer without stopping for an overnight charge. a Volt can make a cross-country trip; no backup "real" car necessary.
        aatbloke1967
        • 3 Years Ago
        @reattadudes
        But the truth is that the majority of Americans wouldn't even contemplate making a cross-country trip in a C-segment hatchback. And in any case, most would choose to fly. So, back to Earth ...
          aatbloke1967
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          "As is you know anything about reality. Nobody cares about England." Given you're a child typing meaningless tripe from the comfort of a bedroom in your parents' house, I shouldn't even bother typing a riposte. But I will; not only have I achieved more with my life than you'll ever achieve, I couldn't care what your thoughts are about England. I know the country and you simply do not. Suffice to say, the USAF personnel I know who are based there feel privileged to spend time in England, whilst working to preserve the very freedoms you have to spout your nonsense.
          aatbloke1967
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          "Seems like a problem at least for me." But evidently not a problem for the 20K buyers around the world though who own one, is it? What kills me about posters on here is that they criticise a vehicle because it wouldn't fit their own particular circumstances or - as is generally more likely - criticise it because it's not American. Have you ever heard of the phrase "you pays your money, and takes your choice"? People who want a strict EV do so because it's enough to fit their needs. My wife wants one; she's a teacher and spends her time running the kids to school - about 10 miles away - and various urban chores for the kids. So, a Leaf would be ideal and it wouldn't be worth spending the extra, $9K or more being a significant amount of money, for a Volt. If someone needs an extended range hybrid like the Volt where an EV perhaps wouldn't necessarily work for them, they'll pay the extra and buy a Volt. These are two different types of vehicle which happened to be released at the same time.
          Joe Ferner
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          It doesn't require making a cross country trip. I live in the outskirts of DC and 9 times out of 10 I don't need to go into the city but occasionally I do, the one way trip is 32.8 miles. Unless there is a charging station downtown I am just barely going to make it. Seems like a problem at least for me.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          [blocked]
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        DrEvil
        • 3 Years Ago
        What's to teach, Nissan built the cheaper car, GM built the better car. The Volt only went on sale NATIONALLY in October 2011.
          lne937s
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DrEvil
          The Volt is a more complicated car, trying to cram in two drivetrains, but not better. The Volt's interior is smaller, battery is smaller, electric range is smaller, can't accept quick charging, etc. The complexity leads to things potentially going wrong (see NHTSA), while the LEAF has not seen one major issue with any of the vehicles delivered to date or any of the vehicles safety tested. And the LEAF still isn't on sale nationwide yet and will not be until sometime next year. Dealer allocations are unlikely untill after the Tennessee plant comes online.
      Sukairain
      • 3 Years Ago
      I am so tempted to buy one, only thing holding me back is the Infiniti version on the horizon. We testdrove the Leaf and came off very impressed. This car is much better built and drives better than the Volt. Range is an issue but for those who make the commitment, it's worth it. There is a astronomical difference between NO GAS, vs Some Gas Some Times Maybe.
        Basil Exposition
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Sukairain
        "There is a astronomical difference between NO GAS, vs Some Gas Some Times Maybe." There sure is! It's the difference between a car that can take you anywhere, anytime and a car that can take you 100 miles max. The difference between a car yo ucan own as your only vehicle and a bauble that sits next to your "real car" in the garage.
      axiomatik
      • 3 Years Ago
      My wife and I just test drove a Leaf this past weekend, and we are seriously considering it. Here in Georgia, it qualifies for a $5000 state tax credit, sweetening the deal further. Between the 2 of us, we have 3 cars, so the range shouldn't be a problem. Her commute is only 5 miles each way, and almost all of our errand/shopping/going to the museum or zoo trips are within 15 miles of our house. It is surprisingly quick. Because it is so quiet, you have less of a sense of speed than in a gas-powered car. Accelerating from a light, the speedometer will hit 50mph much sooner than you expect, especially the way I was driving it. Very smooth operation, exceptionally quiet. We were driving with the radio off, and the motor made a faint, distant high-pitched whine. With the radio on, it would have been completely inaudible. It's certainly a compelling vehicle, and my wife may be able to charge it at work, making our fuel expenses almost zero. The biggest hangup is that it is smaller and shorter than what she wants. With a 1-yr old in a car seat, it is easier to buckle/unbuckle/get him in and out of taller vehicle than having to stoop over and down into a car.
        axiomatik
        • 3 Years Ago
        @axiomatik
        I should also add: another hangup is that it is profoundly ugly. If only it looked more like a Focus or Mazda3 5-door.
      ALafya
      • 3 Years Ago
      Great work Nissan! For many people's daily commute, including mine, such a vehicle is more than what they need. Other can get the Volt or Plug-in Prius. For people needing to drive longer than ~60 miles/day, Plug-in Prius could be more efficient than the Volt.
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