It's easy to talk endlessly about unbelievably powerful cars, almost to the point that numbers become meaningless. In an effort to crystallize what 1,200 horses in a 2,685-pound car can do in the real world, we present a new video of the 2012 Hennessey Venom GT.

In the time it takes your wheezy Civic to go from 65 to 75 mph, the Venom GT has sprinted from 70 mph to a staggering 215 and is on its cool-down run. If you were to push hard enough with enough road, Hennessey says the Venom GT wouldn't stop until it hit 275 mph. Click past the jump to see the what the instrument cluster in the Venom looks like when you drop the hammer at 70 mph.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 144 Comments
      Scot Ferguson
      • 3 Years Ago
      The most unbelievable thing is that this car actually generates its own fuel! Watch the fuel gauge as he slows down, about 55 seconds in. Astonishing!
      hobbesfanmaster
      • 3 Years Ago
      ...good god...
      another Dan
      • 3 Years Ago
      can't wait to see what old man Clarkson has to say about it.
      Peter T
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ultimate Showoff: Hennessey Venom GT vs. Koenisegg Agera R vs. Bugatti Veyron vs. SSC Tuatara which of these do you guys think will have the fastest 1/2 mile and/or lap time around a track???
        j3oomerang
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Peter T
        No idea, but I'd probably go with the Tuatara regardless.
      trans-am phoenix
      • 3 Years Ago
      Powered by something that has been proven over so many years GM push-rod V8.
      protovici
      • 3 Years Ago
      2.2 lbs per hp, yeah that would be fast in any two or four wheeled machine.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Deenis
      • 3 Years Ago
      Short shifted even...by a lot bit
        Sugaki
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Deenis
        The ideal shifting point isn't always at the redline--depends on where and how the car makes its peak power. If the power drops off a lot at higher RPMs, then it wouldn't make sense to rev high up. Since we don't know the power curve for this engine, it's hard to say where he should've shifted.
          airchompers
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Sugaki
          we do know that it makes 1200 hp, so it's likely that there's power EVERYWHERE.
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Sugaki
          It's never that low. Torque drops off a ton at high revs, but power is a function of revs and torque, so the power drop isn't as steep. This was likely short shifted to limit power, not to maximize it.
      Doug Danzeisen Sr
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is how you spell FAST! As the late John Belushi said in the film Animal House- HOLY SHITTT. Carlos I agree with you that the car is a mongrel-- so was a Ford called the GT 40 from the sixties. You may have heard of it dominating a little race in the mid to late sixties- called LeMans. The Shelby Cobra was also a mongrel what with the AC chassis and that low brow, pushrod Ford engine. I could go on, and on, but surely you get the point. That car is stupid fast and cleans the clocks of many highly pedigreed european thoroughbreds. Really! Do you not think that the fact that this car works is not incredible? Face it, the GN "small block" is a serious engine, despite what you may have heard from your snooty friends about the moral superiority of overhead cams and whirly bits. The power density, relative fuel efficiency, smaller dimensions and weight compared with many competitive engines show that, while comparatively simple inexecution this architecture is not without great strenfths. Pass the Grey Poupon and move to the slow lane please!
        Carlos Cruz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Doug Danzeisen Sr
        Sorry, but Ill take my DOHC vs. your OHV any day. "Though the system that drives the cams may become more complex, most engine manufacturers easily accept that added complexity in trade for better engine performance and greater design flexibility. Another performance advantage is gained as a result of the better optimized port configurations made possible with overhead camshaft designs. With no intrusive pushrods the overhead camshaft cylinder head design can use straighter ports of more advantageous crossection and length." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overhead_camshaft#Double_overhead_camshaft
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Carlos Cruz
          That's an entire paragraph of weasel words. It's wikipedia. It is far more likely that the person who wrote this is an OHC fanboy who has never designed an engine in his (or her) life than it is the writer actually has a handle on the issues.
          sparrk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Carlos Cruz
          @ Carlos Cruz , that's where displacement size limits apply because of racing regulations, tax laws , etc.
      Deenis
      • 3 Years Ago
      Short shifted even!
      nastygear7
      • 3 Years Ago
      This car the SSC aero TT is what needs to inspire our domestic american car companies
      Daniel Wright
      • 3 Years Ago
      Unreal
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