Mercedes-Benz S400 Hybrid – Click above for high-res image gallery

Jaguar built an electric XJ last year, Rolls-Royce showed off an electric Phantom this year, now Autocar reports that Mercedes is open to considering an electric offering. To be precise, Autocar said such an S-Class "is not being ruled out" and that Mercedes' technical head Thomas Weber said, "We are looking at customer demand." All that really means is that it's on the table, probably alongside a whole lot of other things that might or might not ever happen.

However, Mercedes is part-way there with its S400 Hybrid, and the next S-Class due in 2013 will add a plug-in hybrid option. Until then it'll be up to Fisker to – eventually – bring ionized motoring to the luxury sedan masses.




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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 15 Comments
      Dave
      • 4 Years Ago
      Mercedes is at the forefront of fuel cell development. There is no doubt there will be an electric S-Class in the near future. The question is how much of the electricity will come from a battery pack, and how much from a fuel cell?
        Dave
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Dave
        "Aside from F-Cell B-Class cars that have been on field tests since 2009, Mercedes is also using the technology in its Citaro FuelCell Hybrid city bus. Mercedes has also confirmed F-Cell versions of the C- and E-Class models. When and where these models will first appear is not definite because of the lack of apparent infrastructure support for the technology." http://www.benzinsider.com/2011/03/mercedes-announces-fuel-cell-production-in-canada/
      jpcar
      • 4 Years Ago
      Too heavy.
        Zonda
        • 4 Years Ago
        @jpcar
        Its an S-Class, its already too heavy. That doesn't bother anyone now does it?
      • 4 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Hazdaz
      • 4 Years Ago
      Big luxury cars and electric power go together like peanut butter and jelly. Cars like the S-class tend to be large, which gives space for the battery packs. They tend to already be heavy, so the added weight of batteries won't add a considerable amount more to the overall weight of the car. Electric motors are very quiet, which goes along with the luxury side of these vehicles. Electric motors have gobs of torque at 0 RPMs, which again, goes along with the seamless power that upscale buyers expect of their luxo-barges. Cars like the S-class are already very expensive, so the cost of electric motors and battery packs is almost negligible to the total vehicle cost. Also the buyers of large luxury cars tend to be the right demographic to have well-furnished garages (for the electric chargers), and the availability of a 2nd or 3rd vehicle when the limited range of an EV just don't do for that rare trip to the summer home.
        Dalexx
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        You are forgetting one important aspect and that is long journeys, which luxury cars like the s-class are supposed to excel at. EV's are not quite up for that task as yet.
      julien
      • 4 Years Ago
      I love this car, we have a 2010 S550 and there is just nothing else like it in the class!
      Dalexx
      • 4 Years Ago
      i'm not a big fan of the electric phanton. anyone can do that in their spare time. However, i would love to see what M-B can come up with if they dedicate abt five years to develop a proper all electric s-class though.
      Zonda
      • 4 Years Ago
      Fabulous, the more electric the merrier. The more application of electric cars to both develop and prove is ABSOLUTELY fantastic.
      avatar-ds
      • 4 Years Ago
      Why not just proudly (and honestly) call it a "coal burning" Mercedes Benz? Coal burning accounts for 68% of electricity in China and 49% in US, two largest car markets.
        dreadcthulhu01
        • 4 Years Ago
        @avatar-ds
        Coal is rather dirty, but cheap. And the US has very large reserves of it, which means that powering a larger portion of our vehicles with coal would benefit both the security and economy of the US.
        emperorkoku
        • 4 Years Ago
        @avatar-ds
        Also, CO2 emissions are reduced when you switch from gasoline cars, each with their individual ICE, to electric cars run off a coal-powered grid. Yes, it's still dirty. The point is it's LESS dirty. And the fuel comes from here, not the middle east.
        Dave
        • 4 Years Ago
        @avatar-ds
        Coal gasification is also one of the proposed methods for producing large volumes of hydrogen. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_gasification
      mbzcrazy
      • 4 Years Ago
      Its about time that Mercedes steps up and once again leads the automobile industry with innovative ideas and developments. I have been posted similar comments on my blog: http://www.autowerkesformercedes.com regarding Mercedes need to challenge these other car manufactures that are leading the charge with EVs. Let be serious...would you rather be driving an electric Mercedes S class or the Nissan Leaf??
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