• Feb 23, 2011
Kickboxer Diesel all-wheel drive concept – Click above for high-res image gallery

It's been a while since we heard anything from Ian McElroy. As you may recall, he's the twisted mind who came up with the notion of lodging a Subaru boxer four-cylinder between the rails of a motorcycle frame. Well, it appears that he's been a busy bee since showing off his first take on the Kickboxer Concept. McElroy has set about reimagining his creation with a diesel boxer lump at the heart of the action. The engine is still sourced from Fuji Heavy Industries, though it's both smaller and more efficient than the old gasoline lump.

The newest addition to the Kickboxer family boasts new body work and a different swing arm design along with a new turbo configuration. Not quite mad enough for you? How about sticking an all-wheel drive version of the oil-burning moto in your pipe? McElroy worked up a twin-chain design that works with some help from a jack shaft, idler sprocket and a drive axle.

These aren't just some random renderings, though. McElroy says that he has all of the CAD files he needs to have the bikes machined and built. All he needs is the coin to do so. Shall we start passing the hat?



[Source: The Kneeslider]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 39 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      Imagine the torque steer!!!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Yes, the diesel idea is sound, ( I like the idea of torque and efficiency ) especially for a long distance dual-sport machine as opposed to this radical sport-oriented ride, but the front chain idea is simply ridiculous and de-values the rest of the concept. BS
      • 3 Years Ago
      So the front wheel can overrun the rear, but if you spin up the rear, the clutch locks?
      • 3 Years Ago
      This guy is clearly barking mad.

      I think I'm in love.

      I wonder how much it would tow. :-)
      • 3 Years Ago
      Pretty cool engineering exercise. It's fun to think how the front wheel steers. Also, where is the rear brake? And am I crazy, or are those straps above the engine and below the right hand grip?

      Finally, why make the gas tank so upright? With the declining angle of the seat, you're 100% guaranteed to get your balls crushed.
        • 3 Years Ago
        BoxerFanatic - I think I get what you're saying about the steering. And I agree with you about the best uses for a diesel engine, but I can't help think of the Audi R10 winning LeMans. It didn't win only because it made less frequent pit stops.
        • 3 Years Ago
        That is the boxer intake manifold that wraps up over the frame and under the tank.


        As I already commented on Kneeslider about this... the front chain to mid-chain sprocket probably has some sort of slip-able clutch that allows differential action between the front and directly driven rear wheels, and the front wheel is very likely hub-steered with the sprocket fixed in it's plane of operation.

        I like diesel engines for what they do well. Sporty cars and sporty motorcycles, I am not convinced that is something diesel does well, with only a 4500RPM redline. The character of the engine and it's power delivery just doesn't seem quite right for that purpose. A lower-speed utility vehicle, sure. I can only imagine a 6x6 side-by-side ATV driven by a Subaru turbo diesel boxer, or something with tracks....

        Very interesting concept, but it seems way over the top, both in styling and purpose.
      • 3 Years Ago
      When the front wheel turns, what keeps the chain taut, or from breaking?
        • 3 Years Ago
        I'll believe it when I see it.. Working. This concept would be a headache to produce.
        • 3 Years Ago
        The more I look at the front of the bike, the more I think the AWD/2WD thing is a fake.

        The RWD orange bike would work. The shock & spring go the "right" way, and appear that they would support the front swingarm properly, with a normal steering knuckle and arm for the front axle.

        The AWD blue bike doesn't make sense as a road bike. The shock is backwards, and there's no spring. It looks like the steering link was removed for the AWD stuff. I don't see how the center diff is handled. Nor the CVD setup.

        The AWD bike appears to be a straight-line runner, only, such that any steering slip will be handled at the contact patches, rather than in the driveline. Good for Boneville, bad anywhere else.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I assume that the front CV joint is at the front axle, but I can't really tell. It's possible that the CV joint for the front drive could be concentric with the shaft that attaches to the center chain, and everything rotates around that. Like a Dyson Ball.

        OTOH, it could just be a high speed vehicle, in which case, turning the wheel isn't a big deal, as it's primarily lean-based and there only needs to be enough clearance and play for countersteering to set up the lean.

        Regardless, the detail of the front CV joint / swingarm just isn't clear, and it's not obvious how the front works from the pictures provided.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Turning's for pu$$ies.
        • 3 Years Ago
        For 2WD I figure a hydrostatic drive would be more flexible, literally..
        • 3 Years Ago
        ^^^Irony: posting a broken link as an answer to a question about broken chain (links).

        One more time:
        http://img812.imageshack.us/img812/186/chucknorrisi.jpg
        • 3 Years Ago
        That's a lot of chain to get appendages caught in. Have to worry about more then the chain braking...
        • 3 Years Ago
        It's a modification of hub center steering.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hub-center_steering
        • 3 Years Ago
        What keeps the chain from breaking? This. This keeps the chain from breaking:
        http://www.crazynfunny.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/chuck-norris.jpg
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love the idea, but it seems needlessly ridiculous. Then again, so do most super cars and people still buy those. I say build it.
      • 3 Years Ago
      When's the Jean-Claude Van Damm edition come out?
        • 3 Years Ago
        Nuk Soo Cow! Nuk Soo Cow!
      • 3 Years Ago
      Needs all-wheel-steering.
        • 3 Years Ago
        I was thinking when I saw this, that is just needs to be articulated in the center, between the front and rear swingarm pivots.

        Have the whole motorcycle bend in the middle to steer.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wonder how much that Kickboxer weighs ?

      Heres a 2009 Yam R1 2 wd -- boring video

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TrvXwoGKKU
      • 3 Years Ago
      The left side of my brain does not really see the point. Under hard acceleration most of the weight is on the back tire anyway, and because of added weight I don't see this thing making it around the track faster than a coventional RWD bike.

      The rest of me says, "HOLY SH!T! THAT'S AWESOME!"
        • 3 Years Ago
        @monoposto there will be soon, i saw a few at the dealer expo last weekend, mostly dirtbikes.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Ducman is right for the most part.

        " However if there are tighter corners not to mention moisture...a 2WD road bike would definitely have an advantage and that gap widens with off-road bikes for obvious reasons."

        You absolutely wouldn't want that. On any bike, this system would not be made to give you power. It would destroy your traction, and you'd hit the ground on the low side.

        However he is wrong in that there are 2WD bikes, but they are made for low traction environments, and their mechanisms aren't so much a dual power situation, but a limited slip differential situation. This is totally different, and is why they're only in dirt bikes, trail bikes, and tourers. Basically, bikes where you're likely to get in a situation where your rear tyre doesn't have traction, and you still want to put down power. I could see maybe stunt road bikes having them as a novelty, but that's about it.

        If you've really been riding for that long, and don't understand what you're front tyres doing, you should really get some training, read twist of the wrist, and similar. I know a lot of guys who never bothered to really invest in learning, who have been amazed when they eventually did, and learnt so much. Especially all the unintuitive stuff.
        • 3 Years Ago
        "At first glance, yes it would seem that a conventional rear drive bike would be faster. However if there are tighter corners not to mention moisture...a 2WD road bike would definitely have an advantage and that gap widens with off-road bikes for obvious reasons."

        Have you ever ridden a sportbike or dirtbike? I have had both (sixteen years experience) including a sport-tourer and adventure bike as a daily driver at present, and your statement is patently false.

        This is NOT A CAR, and car AWD logic does not apply to motorcycles. The front tire is thinner for improved turnin and has very little weight on it under acceleration. For on road bikes, putting power on the front wheel is likely to cause washout and an uncontrollable low-side. For an offroad bike, you want the front tire to dig while you control the angle of the bike through controlled slip of the rear.

        Beyond mechanical complexity, friction, maintenance, cost, and increased weight, which this is the worst kind of BTW, it can and does reduce the performance of the vehicle. That is why no AWD motorcycles exist.
        • 3 Years Ago
        • 3 Years Ago
        Touche'. Fair enough, you have an educated opinion then (and I've only had two track days... and I sucked). I just assumed you were like my Subaru WRX coworker that insists his car can perform feats of magic and is thus better in every way than my Vette due to the beauty of AWD commercials on TV. ;)

        I hadn't seen any 2WD bikes in showrooms before, did not realize there were any in Europe. As an American though, the fact that I know where Europe is approximately on a globe is IMO sufficient foreign knowledge.
        • 3 Years Ago
        Ducman69,

        You seem like an intelligent guy and with a name like Ducman, I'm assuming you're a fellow rider. I haven't been riding as long as you but I've owned over a dozen bikes so far (3 of those were dirt bikes not to mention a couple of quads) and all my street bikes have been purely sportbikes from almost every Japanese manufacturer and the last 2 have been Ducs. Just about all have been used for track days as they should be.

        For you to assume that a 2WD motorcycle does not exist is just ignorance (Google is your friend)

        Assuming that a 2WD bike is superior in every way is also being closed-minded.

        • 3 Years Ago
        At first glance, yes it would seem that a conventional rear drive bike would be faster. However if there are tighter corners not to mention moisture...a 2WD road bike would definitely have an advantage and that gap widens with off-road bikes for obvious reasons.

        This disadvantage with the machine above would be weight. That thing has got to be a pig. Mechanically propelling the front wheel is heavy and complex. A better solution is a hydraulically driven front wheel which KTM and Yamaha (in partnership with Ohlins) already have had for quite a while now.

        I'm actually surprised that more 2WD motorcycles (especially dirt bikes) are not being sold currently.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Besides seeing no way to turn this thing in the real world, Can I get some foot pegs or do I just drag my feet?
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