• Oct 22, 2010
Green Car of the Year finalists – Click above for high-res image gallery

Green Car Journal
has chosen its five candidates for the 2011 Green Car of the Year Award. Competition is fierce this time around with both the Nissan Leaf and Chevrolet Volt nabbing nods. While those two have been busy snapping up headlines over the past year, the rest of the vehicles on the list are no less impressive. The Lincoln MKZ Hybrid made the cut thanks to its incredibly efficient drivetrain borrowed from the Ford Fusion Hybrid. Meanwhile, the Hyundai Sonata Hybrid is bound to make an impressive showing thanks to its competent highway mileage and high-tech lithium-polymer battery pack.

Of all of the eligible vehicles, the only one without a battery pack is the lovable 2011 Ford Fiesta. While the subcompact is likely to be eclipsed by the rest of the electron-powered pack, the vehicle's 40 mpg highway is no less impressive than all of the high-tech wizardry on board the hybrids and EVs. The winner of this year's award will be announced at the 2010 LA Auto Show on November 18. Check out our gallery of the nominees below and then hit the jump for the press release.



Photos copyright ©2010 AOL

[Source: Green Car Journal]

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2011 Green Car of the Year Finalists Revealed

Winner to be Announced at the LA Auto Show Nov. 18

LOS ANGELES, October 21, 2010 /PRNewswire/ - Green Car Journal announced today its five finalists for the 2011 Green Car of the Year®, including the 2011 Chevrolet Volt, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid, 2011 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid and the 2011 Nissan LEAF. For the sixth consecutive year, this increasingly important award will be announced during a press conference at the LA Auto Show Press Days on Nov. 18.

The Green Car of the Year® award is a program that honors environmental leadership in the automobile field and recognizes vehicles that become available to consumers during the award year. For the first time, the Green Car of the Year® finalists include two primarily electric-drive vehicles in addition to two hybrids and a high mile-per-gallon, gasoline internal combustion engine.

"These five 2011 Green Car of the Year® finalists reflect an auto industry in transition," said Ron Cogan, editor and publisher of Green Car Journal and editor of GreenCar.com. "It wasn't long ago when electric drive was a novelty. Now, it's expected that auto manufacturers will include electric drive in some form among their model offerings."

While four of the five Green Car of the Year® nominees do incorporate electric drive, the Ford Fiesta nominee underscores that internal combustion continues to evolve in important ways. This hatchback achieves up to 40 EPA estimated highway fuel economy, running on conventional gasoline. Along with vehicles incorporating electric drive, a new generation of internal combustion gasoline and clean diesel models are expected to push efficiencies ever higher in the coming years.

Dozens of potential nominees weighed in during the selection process. Green Car Journal editors considered vehicles employing all fuels and technologies in the effort to raise the bar in environmental performance, including high efficiency gasoline internal combustion, advanced diesel, hybrids, electrics and vehicles capable of running on alternative fuels. In the Green Car of the Year® program, nominees must stand out as exemplary models that forward environmental performance in meaningful and quantifiable ways. Market significance and "newness" are also factors. All nominees must be on sale by January 1 of the award year.

Jurors include leaders of the nation's top environmental organizations, including Carl Pope, chairman of the Sierra Club; Frances Beinecke, president of the Natural Resources Defense Council; Jean-Michel Cousteau, president of Ocean Futures Society and Matt Petersen, president of Global Green USA. Also, Jay Leno, noted auto enthusiast and host of the "Tonight Show," as well as automotive icon Carroll Shelby join Green Car Journal editors in rounding out the 2011 jury.


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  • 20 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      A Fiesta win would be friggen hilarious.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Confused.

      Headline says 2010. Article says 2011.

      And inclusions have cars that aren't out yet. Methinks this whole thing needs revision.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Me thinks that these skunks may not stink! (no exhaust shoot) Pepe Le Pew drives a Brown Volt in only the range extended mode getting less MPG than an 2011 Ford Focus (40MPG). Leaves ya' thinkin' whats in that duffy LEAF mulch around the Fargo wood chipper/log splitter. GM bits and Pieces?
      • 4 Years Ago
      And the ugliest green car goes to... Lincoln. Seriously, it is ugly.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Wait, no CR-Zzzzzz.......?
      • 4 Years Ago
      I can't wait to drive the Leaf this Sunday.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I give it to the Fiesta. Given the selections, it's the one to least likely make me want to blow chuncks when I look at it. Where's the Fisker???
        • 4 Years Ago
        Exactly... Where is it? It's been so long since we've heard about it and still far from seeing one in the roads anytime soon.
      • 4 Years Ago
      I think the Volt will win.
      • 4 Years Ago
      What, no poll?
      • 4 Years Ago
      If the Volt doesn't win this, there's a skunk in the woodpile.
      • 4 Years Ago
      On pure innovation, I would give it to the Volt, but the Leaf is a close second.

      As a consumer, I would either go with the Volt or the Lincoln. The Volt is a bit small for my lifestyle, but you can't ignore 125+mpg. Whereas the Lincoln a more luxuriously appointed version of the already great Fusion Hybrid.
      • 4 Years Ago
      Definitely Chevy Volt deserve this award.
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