• 16
2010 Toyota Prius – Click above for high-res image gallery

If you'd like to know what it's like to be on top in the hybrid segment of the automotive industry, just ask Toyota. The company has held the top spot for eons and it certainly doesn't look like Toyota will relinquish the honor in the foreseeable future. Banking on the success of the Toyota Prius, the company has now captured more than 2.5 million hybrid sales and counting. The Prius, the world's best-selling hybrid vehicle by a significant margin, has accounted for more than 1.8 million of Toyota's total hybrid sales.

If memory serves us right, just last year we reported that Toyota eclipsed the 1.7 million mark for hybrid sales. Now, sales already stand at 2.5 million-plus and are growing at a rate of more than 2,000 per day. The strong boost in Toyota's hybrid sales are attributed to the introduction on the current Prius and the release of the Camry Hybrid in additional markets such as Australia and China. At 2,000 per day, Toyota's hybrid sales are still short of the company's target of one million per year, but not by that much.



[Source: Toyota]


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      • 4 Years Ago
      China is Now the Largest Producer of Automobiles.

      Prius, is the current leader in MPG.

      Are these two facts related?
      Do people see the coming Chinese Gas Price Explosion?

      Where's your job? In China where WalMart and Wall Street want it.
        • 4 Years Ago
        They're also the leaders of electric drive technology, go figure.

        Take our population and multiply it by 4 or so.. and consider that the majority of these folks never had cars until now..

        Yeah, too bad they started this whole 'let's get cars' thing right before peak oil, eh?
      • 4 Years Ago
      The whole industry really owes toyota for taking it on the chin for a little while and proving to the public that hybrids were an OK bet.
      I think that comfort will extend to full EVs too.

      Even now you hear people talking up a bunch of reasons not to buy a prius.
      In the early days it was a full-on din of how stupid a car it was and how it made no sense.

      Congrats to toyota and thanks for having the foresight to persevere.

      I'd throw in that while you never know what will happen until it does - you hear the same caterwauling today about the nissan leaf and similar.
        • 4 Years Ago
        the prius has played an important role but I actually don't think that's how it went. I think the prius was a reaction out of fear of being left behind by the electrification happening in california and a bit elsewhere and pressured by the honda insight at about the same time as the prius. I don't think they were brave leaders and you see that in how they are fighting against plugin hybrid now. (the obivous next step with huge potential, much more so than the prius)
        all the car makers are bumbling, it's just a matter of whatever headless random thing they do that turn out well.
        if any car maker was really into furthering car technology they would be light years ahead of what is being sold today.
        bmw's move into carbon fiber is probably going to be important too but it's also headless and bumbling. I'll bet they tell themselves that they do it for performance reasons and then with a bonus of looking green. I don't think they really understand the advantages of lean design. I can tell from how they deal with the pressure of going green. they think green is a small ugly vehicle for cities, something icky they are only touching with a 20 meter pole. if that wasn't their mindset they would be changing all their cars instead of making something new outside of their cars at arm's length. if BMW actually acted according to the deluded self image they have they would make awesome cars. sleak ultra light ultra quick electric drive 4 seater with tiny range extender. standard cars that could outdrag a veyron on the quarter mile.
        • 4 Years Ago
        I had one of the very first Prii (plural) imported. What a fine car. Totally unique with a great personality.
        • 4 Years Ago
        Dan, the phrase is 10 foot pole :)

        I hope BMW can truly lower the cost of CF to reasonable levels.. true, eventually the savings are massive but no one wants to buy all their fuel up-front.. oops, did I say that?

        Anyone knows what binder BMW is using?.. epoxy?.. and how is it is applied to the fabric?
        • 4 Years Ago
        Dan, you love the sleek ultralight EV or similar and blame everyone for not building it.
        But it is a very tall order to make something like this and make it able to pass crash standards and other marks of modern usability.
        I don't think these are capabilities we will not ultimately be able to engineer.
        However, I also don't think this technology exists now.

        The things you mention which prius might have been a reaction to were all let to die by those other companies because they could not sell them for enough money to enough people.
        Prius had similar problems early on but sucked it up for long enough to prove their product - and that was a benefit to not just themselves but to everyone.
      • 4 Years Ago
      mass transit seems to be only so useful. it doesn't do well in point to point convenience, more pronounced the less population dense the area is.
      what might work is a fleet of small robotic cabs that come to you and take you either to your destination or the nearest higher speed mass transit hub. it should of course be much cheaper and quicker than regular taxis.
      that way you can go anywhere and never need a car nor have parking problems. if small a bit like a tango the roads could also handle much higher traffic, especially combined with really intelligent autonomous coordinated driving. maybe 4 times higher capacity with same roads. accidents would be fewer too.

      I'd buy that for a dollar
      • 4 Years Ago
      China should skip the privately owned cars thing entirely and switch to mass-transit. Their cities are already completely jammed with cars, yet they want millions more to add to the problem?
        • 4 Years Ago
        And America is buying V6-V8 Mustang's and Pickup Trucks.

        But, No there's going to be No Problem.
        [ Keep your eyes closed as you jump off the cliff. ]
        • 4 Years Ago
        mass transit seems to be only so useful. it doesn't do well in point to point convenience, more pronounced the less population dense the area is.
        what might work is a fleet of small robotic cabs that come to you and take you either to your destination or the nearest higher speed mass transit hub. it should of course be much cheaper and quicker than regular taxis.
        that way you can go anywhere and never need a car nor have parking problems. if small a bit like a tango the roads could also handle much higher traffic, especially combined with really intelligent autonomous coordinated driving. maybe 4 times higher capacity with same roads. accidents would be fewer too.

        I'd buy that for a dollar

        (sigh I hate web tech, only in webprogramming is non deterministic behavior considered acceptable, pressing reply here doesn't always work)
      • 4 Years Ago
      to put the volume into perspective, Toyota makes twice as many hybrids every day as Tesla Motors has ever made cars.
      if only the douches would start making plugins or EVs..
      and do it right
      • 4 Years Ago
      Congrats Toyota!

      2000 hybrids a day is a huge number, especially since Toyota had originally planned on selling 12,000 hybrids a year when the Prius was launched in 1997.

      To put things into prespective Toyota will sell almost as many Priuses next week as GM estimates it will sell Volts all of next year.
      • 4 Years Ago
      There's still only one reason not to buy a Prius: It's expensive.

      But there are a million reasons to buy it. Nobody buys a $20-$25k car for practical reasons (otherwise, they'd all be driving MPVs or compact pickups). At this price range, people are buying merely for convenience or performance. Viewed against the competition in this light, the current third-generation Prius is a pretty good car... in terms of both convenience and jaw-dropping economy performance.

      It runs quietly in traffic, almost as quietly at speed (I still hate the engine note... not the fact that it drones... but the timbre and volume of the drone...), it has lots of space, it sits at stoplights with the AC or heater on and the engine off, it goes a long, long way between fuel stops and services, and they've finally fixed the roly-poly handling.

      I would never buy one. Out of my price range (our country doesn't have hybrid subsidies). But if it were, I'd gladly take it. "Boring" driving and all.
        • 4 Years Ago
        In the US the $22k base model is a fairly good deal.. if you compare it to a conventional Toyota Matrix (and adjust for all the options) the Prius is only about $1500 more expensive. The $32k fully optioned Prius is a different story, I guess you have to pay for the gold plated wheels..
      • 4 Years Ago
      Holy crap; those things are selling like hotcakes!

      I'm honestly surprised.
    • Load More Comments