• Jun 3, 2008
2008 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti shown for illustrative purposes

If you are lucky enough to be driving a Ferrari 612 Scaglietti, you probably have the company's automated manual F1 gearbox helping you swap the cogs. With its faster-than-Schumacher shifts, the F1 tranny can make just about anyone feel like a pro. Unfortunately, it can also leave you stranded if heat build-up triggers the clutch sensor. Thus, Ferrari has instituted an official recall of all 612 Scagliettis that could be affected by this finnicky F1 gearbox. Altogether, 366 of the vehicles are being recalled to replace this sensor as well as a related cable holder and magnet that might cause difficult shifting or even complete inoperation. Only model year 2005-2007 612s are affected. If you have one of these in your garage, then you will probably be hearing from your dealer shortly. You can check out the official recall notice from the NHTSA after the jump.

RECALL SUMMARY

Make / Models : Model/Build Years:
FERRARI / 612 SCAGLIETTI 2005-2007

Recall Number: 08V214000

Summary:
FERRARI IS RECALLING 366 MY 2005-2007 612 SCAGLIETTI VEHICLES EQUIPPED WITH F1 TRANSMISSIONS. A NONCONFORMING CLUTCH SENSOR IN THE TRANSMISSION COULD MALFUNCTION UNDER NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS DUE TO THE HEAT PRODUCED BY THE VEHICLE. SUCH SENSOR MALFUNCTION MAY INHIBIT THE PROPER FUNCTION OF THE CLUTCH ASSEMBLY MAKING THE SHIFTING OF THE GEARS VERY DIFFICULT. THE VEHICLE SYSTEM IMMEDIATELY DETECTS THE CLUTCH SENSOR FAILURE AND CAUSES THE WARNING LIGHT TO ILLUMINATE.

Consequence:
THIS CLUTCH SENSOR MALFUNCTION MAY RENDER THE VEHICLE INOPERABLE AND, POSSIBLY, RESULTING IN A CRASH.

Remedy:
DEALERS WILL REPLACE THE CLUTCH SENSOR. IN ADDITION, THE CABLE HOLDER AND MAGNET WILL ALSO BE REPLACED. THE RECALL BEGAN ON MAY 19, 2008. OWNERS MAY CONTACT FERRARI AT 1-201-816-2600.

Notes:
FERRARI RECALL NO. 47. CUSTOMERS MAY ALSO CONTACT THE NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION'S VEHICLE SAFETY HOTLINE AT 1-888-327-4236 (TTY 1-800-424-9153), OR GO TO HTTP://WWW.SAFERCAR.GOV.

[Source: NHTSA via Carscoop]


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      • 6 Years Ago
      Isn't it about time for Ferrari to dump its F1 gear box and get help from BorgWarner? I mean, BMW has given up its SMG for the much better dual clutch DKG.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I'm sure they have their own version in R&D, forgoing the need to go slumming.
        • 6 Years Ago
        I wouldn't call it slumming. The dual clutch design is actually a very clever one when compared to Ferrari's F1 gear box. The dual clutch design only take 8 milliseconds to shift, whereas the F1 gear box takes 150 milliseconds.
      edbaalbaki
      • 3 Years Ago
      I can not believe it. I been told about the Re-call from a friend. My 2006 612 Scaglietti got stuck on 5th gear on the freeway (i was doing 75 mile). I called the dealer in Redwood city, CA and I spoke with the manager I told him the problem. he never once said anything about the re-call. I called him again and I told him about the re-call he flat -out denied that the 612 got any re-call. My car is working fine now without doing anything to the gear. So for sure it is the heat build-up that triggers the problem. I am sure, this problem will come back again. I am taken my car to SF Ferrari Dealer.
      • 6 Years Ago
      FEEL like a pro, not fell.
      • 6 Years Ago
      noone is perfect
      • 6 Years Ago
      Heat build up?!?! Where'd that burning 612 photo go.. i'm sure they're unrelated
      • 6 Years Ago
      Just buy a real manual. Few electronics FTW! I can't drive like Schumacher anyways, so a few tenths of a second gained in shifting will be lost in all the other mistakes I make in the fantasy world where I am racing him in my 612 Scaglietti.
        • 6 Years Ago
        but car & drver did the contreversial comparison of the 911 and gt-r with the m3 thrwon in randomly and picked the m3 with the mightweight and manuel transmission
        • 6 Years Ago
        Quattroporte & Derek:

        The problem with a subjective statement like, "I like a manual because it is more fun," is that, what's fun to one may or may not be fun to another. If you haven't noticed, Car & Driver regularly uses a lot of subjective measures to judge their car comparisons, whereas Edmunds used objective measures like track times in the article I cited. Personally, I wouldn't find it fun to come in 5th place in a race of 6 different cars in two different race venues, but that's just me.

        And here's another thing about electonic "nannies": They compensate for the errors of bad drivers, no doubt about it, because that's by and large what they are designed to do. At the same time, they also inspire confidence in good drivers, and encourage them to operate in a larger performance envelope. That's pretty much the verdict of the Edmunds article I mentioned above, especially in regards to their review of the Lotus Elise.

        Is it possible for the Edmunds drivers to have piloted the Elise faster? You bet. Did they dare to do so on dangerous mountain roads in the real world, where crashes cannot be magically reset by a videogame button? Therein lies the problem, hence the benefit of electronic aids in the real world.
        • 6 Years Ago
        The problem with encouraging drivers to drive in a larger performance envelope in a street car is that ten tenths is still the limit and no electronic aids will change physics. If these aids encourage someone out for a joyride to push from 7/10 to 8/10 or even 9/10 then they are that much closer to 10.1/10 when someone else does something that they weren't expecting. The electronics cannot remove gravel or oil from the road nor can they stop that person in the pickup from pulling out in front of you.

        Choosing a car is a subjective thing anyways, that's why people take test drives instead of basing their opinion on a magazine article. So, please, buy whatever car you like and enjoy its features. I'm sure you'll be happy.
        • 6 Years Ago
        @Big Rocket

        But, Edmunds Inside Line Editor in Chief Scott Oldham also says:

        "The 2009 Nissan GT-R isn't for me.

        There I said it. I've come clean. The holy grail of new performance cars, the great Nissan GT-R, isn't my thing. Man, what a load off my chest.

        Now, before you threaten my kids, let me explain.

        Fact is, I've now driven three different GT-Rs a total of 2,200 miles, which probably means I have more miles in a GT-R than any other American. And I have no hesitation calling it the best performance car you can buy at any price. Sure the steering is unnecessarily heavy, the ride is ridiculously harsh and the engine is just too damn quiet, but this is an amazing machine. Pure speed. If going fast is your goal, the Nissan GT-R is the car to have.

        Trouble is, there are several cars on the market for the same money that also go way too fast, but offer more luxury, more prestige and more fun. They are, in no particular order: the Mercedes-Benz C63, the BMW M3, the Porsche 911 and a well-used but well-preserved Ferrari F355.

        Although none of those cars can really run with the almighty GT-R, each is capable of sub-5-second 0-to-60-mph times, 12-second quarter-mile runs and enough G-load to cause a redout. They're also more luxurious, more livable and far more impressive to members of the opposite sex, most of whom would see the GT-R and wonder why you put that big ugly wing on your 300ZX.

        Then there's the hooligan factor. Sometimes having a fast car isn't only about speed. Sometimes it's about fun. And the GT-R, with its very sophisticated all-wheel-drive system, gets a big fat zero in this category. Powerslides and burnouts aren't really in the GT-R's vocabulary. Sure, it's fun to use its launch mode and leave the world behind, but most of the time I'd rather shave a little life off my rear tires.

        Don't get your pocket protector in a bunch. I know burnouts and powerslides are slow. But there are times when I prefer blazing the tires through a couple of gears or a good old-fashioned powerslide to all-out speed. Such recklessness always makes me smile. And nobody is timing me in the real world; rarely do I try to shave a tenth of a second on my way to Costco.

        Which brings me back to the GT-R. It's a serious performance machine. Maybe a little too serious. I prefer cars with a lighter side. Cars with a second dimension. Cars with a little less to prove. Even if they are slower around the Nürburging, they're usually more fun."

        http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/Drives/FullTests/articleId=126103/pageId=138537
        • 6 Years Ago
        I'll be honest: if I'm ever unfortunate enough to hit an unexpected patch of loose gravel, oil slick, black ice, etc on a dangerous mountain road, I pray I have all the electronic aids working to save my behind. They don't change physics, but technologies such as awd and traction control work with physics to: 1) expand the performance envelope; and 2) help recover the car quicker than most humans, myself included. If only some people wouldn't have such a knee-jerk reaction against these so-called "nannies", as though their driving experience is going to be somehow degraded and dumbed down. Unless you were driving at the handling limits of the car, some of the electronic aids (awd and traction control re-directing power to different wheels) wouldn't even kick in.
        • 6 Years Ago
        Edmunds Inside Line recently tested 6 different sports cars, on a race track and on winding mountain roads. Guess what? The most purist car with a real manual and the fewest electronic aids came in 2nd last place. "... measured against the best cars modern technology [can] produce, Colin Chapman's simpler-is-better ethos is beginning to show itself for what it is: old." Enough said.

        Source:
        http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/Features/articleId=126453
        • 6 Years Ago
        To Big Rocket: I read their article. Sounded like they need to learn to drive the Elise better (or maybe just any car without electronic aids). Honestly, the article made me want to buy an Elise more.

        The problem with cars that have all these aids is that *anyone* can drive them like that. Sorry, no skill involved. *yawn*

        I give two thumbs up to the engineers behind it, but it leaves little room for the owner to take credit for what the car is doing. Like trying to take credit for the smooth shifts in a Lexus. The driver had nothing to do with it. There's already too much fake in the world around us (special effects, rubber boobs, photoshop, etc) I'll take something *real* thank you. Even if it is a bit slower.
      • 6 Years Ago
      Just got a call from my dealer today....

      no, not really. One could dream, no? California/Dino will sufifice...
      • 6 Years Ago
      is it even possible to buy a ferrari with a normal manual transmission with a clutch anymore? is it even offered as an option?
        • 6 Years Ago
        the semi-autos are usually £6-8000 options, but everyone seems to go with them, when your buying a £200k car whats another 10 on options lol
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