Final Rolls-Royce Phantom VII
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History of the Rolls-Royce Phantom

Rolls-Royce just built the last of its seventh-generation Phantom sedans. The last one is a maritime-inspired long-wheelbase variant that is just as decadent as you'd hope the last Phantom would be. And, now that this generation of Phantoms is at an end, we thought it would be a good time to take a look at the Phantoms of the past. Click ahead to see the Phantom that started it all.

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Rolls-Royce Phantom I
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1925-1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I

The Phantom line got its start in 1925. The car replaced the Silver Ghost, but still used the Ghost's chassis, which was built both in England and the US. What the car didn't borrow was the 7.7-liter inline-six engine under the hood.

Like most cars of the time, Rolls-Royce sold chassis to customers who would have a custom body. Not all of the cars kept the same body through the years, though. One of the most famous first-generation Phantoms is the "round-door" Rolls-Royce at the Petersen Automotive Museum. According to the museum, it was rebodied in 1934. The new body was sleek and streamlined in '30s fashion, and featured amazing circular doors.

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Rolls-Royce Phantom II
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1930-1935 Rolls-Royce Phantom II

For the second generation of the Phantom, Rolls-Royce made a few more changes. The existing inline-six was reworked, and a completely new frame was created.

A Phantom II also has a brief cameo in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. When the Nazis want access to the country of Hatay to find the Holy Grail, they attempt to bribe the country's leader with various valuables. However, it's a Rolls-Royce Phantom II that convinces the leader to provide the Nazis access to the country and support.

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Rolls-Royce Phantom III
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1936-1939 Rolls-Royce Phantom III

The Phantom III's claim to fame is under the hood. For this generation, Rolls-Royce doubled the number of cylinders of previous models with a V12 engine. Until the introduction of the Phantom VII in 2003, this was the only Phantom model to boast 12 cylinders. This was also the last Phantom built before World War II.
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Rolls-Royce Phantom IV
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1950-1956 Rolls-Royce Phantom IV

It wasn't until five years after World War II that Rolls-Royce would create a new Phantom, and it was extraordinarily rare. Only 18 fourth-generation Phantoms were built. As a result of this rarity, the Phantom IV carries a high price tag today. According to Hagerty Insurance, a pristine, concours-quality 1950 Phantom IV can go for about $1.2 million.
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1963 Rolls Royce Phantom V
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1959-1968 Rolls-Royce Phantom V

The Rolls-Royce Phantom V, in addition to sporting the most modern bodywork yet for the line, was also built at the Bentley factory in Crewe after Rolls took possession of the luxury automaker. Besides being built in a factory with a different make of car, it had some foreign parts under the skin. The Rolls-Royce V8 was coupled to a Hydramatic automatic transmission from General Motors.
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1969-1991 Rolls-Royce Phantom VI
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1969-1991 Rolls-Royce Phantom VI

While the 13-year run from 2003 to 2016 seemed like a long stretch for the outgoing Phantom, it doesn't hold a candle to the run of the sixth-generation. The Phantom VI was in production for a whopping 22 years. The later versions never made it to the US, though, since it couldn't meet increasingly strict safety and emissions regulations.
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Final Rolls-Royce Phantom VII
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2003-2016 Rolls-Royce Phantom VII

The most recent generation of the Phantom arrived in 2003. It was the first Rolls-Royce designed and engineered under the watchful eye of its new owner, BMW. It also became the second Phantom to have a V12, this one producing about 460 horsepower and 531 lb-ft of torque. The car featured a variety of nifty touches, such as a "Spirit of Ecstasy" hood ornament that could retract into the grille, center caps that always stayed upright, and umbrellas in the doors.

The very last edition, pictured here, was a long-wheelbase model with one-of-a-kind details themed around ship travel in the 1930s. Among the features were marquetry wood trim showing a ship, embroidery that looked like waves, and carpeting cut to look like the wake of a ship.

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