2022 Honda Pilot

2022 Pilot Photos
 Editors' Pick
Autoblog Rating
7

A supremely utilitarian and comfortable interior combined with a comfortable ride and great safety ratings make it a good large vehicle for a family that doesn't want a minivan. It's just awfully dated.

Industry
8
This will almost certainly be the final model year for the current-generation Honda Pilot – its seventh since last redesigned. An all-new one, sharing the same platform as the new Acura MDX, is on its way. Truth be told, it can't come soon enough, as time and the competition have not been kind to this three-row family crossover. The 2022 Honda Pilot is just as functional as always, with exceptional cargo space and interior storage. It's a fine family tool. Its resale value and reliability should be strong, too. However, its exterior and interior design are awfully dowdy in the face of newer competitors like the Kia Telluride, Hyundai Palisade and Toyota Highlander. Its interior technology is also frustrating to use, paling in comparison to what you get in those same competitors and most others. Its various driver assistance technology features are also not as well-executed as what you'll find in other brands (or other Hondas, such as the Odyssey). Basically, while newer competitors have shown a family vehicle doesn't have to be dull, the Honda Pilot still satisfies the stereotype. Perhaps its successor will change that. Interior & Technology  |  Passenger & Cargo Space  |  Performance & Fuel Economy What it's like to drive  |  Pricing & Features  |  Crash ratings and safety features What's new for 2022? The bottom rungs on the Pilot trim level ladder have been stripped for 2022 and replaced with a new Sport trim that starts at $38,055, including the $1,225 destination charge. That's $4,280 more than the old LX base trim, but it also comes with more equipment. There's also another new trim level, the 2022 Pilot TrailSport. It comes standard with all-wheel drive, an extra 0.6 inches of ground clearance, fender flares and 18-inch alloy wheels with tires "sporting a more rugged-design sidewall." Oddly, Honda did not release photos of either the Sport or TrailSport at the time of their announcement, which is why they aren't seen in this review.  What's the Pilot interior and in-car technology like? The Pilot cabin is awfully plain compared to what you'll find in a Mazda CX-9, Hyundai Palisade, Kia Telluride or Toyota Highlander. On the other hand, it's also one of the highest-quality and functional cabins in the segment, largely intended with the goal of making parents' lives easier. As we discovered in our Pilot interior review, there are bins everywhere up front, including a giant center bin that's big enough to hide a purse or other valuables. Better still, its flat rolling cover provides extra storage since it doesn't need to serve double duty as an armrest (there are minivan-style rests attached to each front seat). There are also multiple tiers of bins on the doors and in the center stack. Technology isn't as well-executed. Yes, there are plenty of included features, but the touchscreen that controls them can frustrate. Mid-generation updates made it a bit better, but fundamental flaws remain: insufficient menu buttons, no tuning knob and/or direct tune function, and an excessive …
Full Review
This will almost certainly be the final model year for the current-generation Honda Pilot – its seventh since last redesigned. An all-new one, sharing the same platform as the new Acura MDX, is on its way. Truth be told, it can't come soon enough, as time and the competition have not been kind to this three-row family crossover. The 2022 Honda Pilot is just as functional as always, with exceptional cargo space and interior storage. It's a fine family tool. Its resale value and reliability should be strong, too. However, its exterior and interior design are awfully dowdy in the face of newer competitors like the Kia Telluride, Hyundai Palisade and Toyota Highlander. Its interior technology is also frustrating to use, paling in comparison to what you get in those same competitors and most others. Its various driver assistance technology features are also not as well-executed as what you'll find in other brands (or other Hondas, such as the Odyssey). Basically, while newer competitors have shown a family vehicle doesn't have to be dull, the Honda Pilot still satisfies the stereotype. Perhaps its successor will change that. Interior & Technology  |  Passenger & Cargo Space  |  Performance & Fuel Economy What it's like to drive  |  Pricing & Features  |  Crash ratings and safety features What's new for 2022? The bottom rungs on the Pilot trim level ladder have been stripped for 2022 and replaced with a new Sport trim that starts at $38,055, including the $1,225 destination charge. That's $4,280 more than the old LX base trim, but it also comes with more equipment. There's also another new trim level, the 2022 Pilot TrailSport. It comes standard with all-wheel drive, an extra 0.6 inches of ground clearance, fender flares and 18-inch alloy wheels with tires "sporting a more rugged-design sidewall." Oddly, Honda did not release photos of either the Sport or TrailSport at the time of their announcement, which is why they aren't seen in this review.  What's the Pilot interior and in-car technology like? The Pilot cabin is awfully plain compared to what you'll find in a Mazda CX-9, Hyundai Palisade, Kia Telluride or Toyota Highlander. On the other hand, it's also one of the highest-quality and functional cabins in the segment, largely intended with the goal of making parents' lives easier. As we discovered in our Pilot interior review, there are bins everywhere up front, including a giant center bin that's big enough to hide a purse or other valuables. Better still, its flat rolling cover provides extra storage since it doesn't need to serve double duty as an armrest (there are minivan-style rests attached to each front seat). There are also multiple tiers of bins on the doors and in the center stack. Technology isn't as well-executed. Yes, there are plenty of included features, but the touchscreen that controls them can frustrate. Mid-generation updates made it a bit better, but fundamental flaws remain: insufficient menu buttons, no tuning knob and/or direct tune function, and an excessive …
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Retail Price

$38,080 - $51,870 MSRP / Window Sticker Price
Engine 3.5L V-6
MPG Up to 20 city / 27 highway
Seating 8 Passengers
Transmission 9-spd auto w/OD
Power 280 @ 6000 rpm
Drivetrain all wheel, front-wheel
Curb Weight 4,030 - 4,321 lbs
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