2021 Dodge Charger

2021 Charger Photos
The 2021 Dodge Charger is capable of performing several roles, from a perfectly reasonable and stylish family sedan all the way to a fire-breathing muscle car that can crest an almost unbelievable 200 miles per hour. Buyers who need a daily driver but aren’t willing to give up their performance-fueled dreams ought to find plenty to like in the Dodge Charger lineup. But drivers who are more interested in blending in on their morning commute may want to look elsewhere — options like the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry might be more pleasant to live with and will certainly be more fuel efficient than the Charger.

A Widebody package was introduced last year, adding 3.5 inches to the Charger’s width and allowing fitment of 20x11-inch forged aluminum wheels wearing massive 305/35ZR20 tires. Those steamroller tires offer significantly improved roadholding ability and, combined with aggressive front and rear styling, make the Widebody an appealing package for driving enthusiasts. That model continues for 2021, along with a Hellcat Redeye edition that shares the same wide fenders but adds a 797-horsepower supercharged V8.

The Charger’s powertrain packages vary from model to model. The line starts with the SXT trim level, which is powered by a 292-horsepower V6. The GT model is next with a 300-hp version of the same engine. All-wheel drive is optional on six-cylinder Charger sedans. Stepping up to the R/T brings a 370-hp 5.7-liter Hemi V8, while the R/T Scat Pack gains a thunderous 485-hp V8 and an optional Widebody package. The Charger SRT Hellcat shreds its tires with a 717-hp, supercharged 6.2-liter V8 (up 10 ponies over last year’s model) and gets a hood with functional air intakes, just like the Redeye model.

Fuel efficiency is not the Charger’s strong suit. Base V6 models achieve EPA-estimated ratings of 19 mpg city, 30 mpg highway and 23 mpg combined. All-wheel drive knocks those ratings down to 18/27/21. The 5.7-liter V8 is rated at 16/25/19, and the larger 6.4-liter 392-badged models are even worse at 15/24/18. Not that SRT Hellcat buyers are likely to care about efficiency, but that model’s 13 mpg city, 22 mpg highway and 16 mpg combined ratings mean it can only travel around 296 miles per 18.5-gallon tank of premium fuel. We don’t have Hellcat Redeye fuel efficiency numbers, but expect them to be terrible.

You can use the rest of this page to find more in-depth information about the 2021 Dodge Charger, including features, specs and where to find a good deal near you.

Full Review
The 2021 Dodge Charger is capable of performing several roles, from a perfectly reasonable and stylish family sedan all the way to a fire-breathing muscle car that can crest an almost unbelievable 200 miles per hour. Buyers who need a daily driver but aren’t willing to give up their performance-fueled dreams ought to find plenty to like in the Dodge Charger lineup. But drivers who are more interested in blending in on their morning commute may want to look elsewhere — options like the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry might be more pleasant to live with and will certainly be more fuel efficient than the Charger.

A Widebody package was introduced last year, adding 3.5 inches to the Charger’s width and allowing fitment of 20x11-inch forged aluminum wheels wearing massive 305/35ZR20 tires. Those steamroller tires offer significantly improved roadholding ability and, combined with aggressive front and rear styling, make the Widebody an appealing package for driving enthusiasts. That model continues for 2021, along with a Hellcat Redeye edition that shares the same wide fenders but adds a 797-horsepower supercharged V8.

The Charger’s powertrain packages vary from model to model. The line starts with the SXT trim level, which is powered by a 292-horsepower V6. The GT model is next with a 300-hp version of the same engine. All-wheel drive is optional on six-cylinder Charger sedans. Stepping up to the R/T brings a 370-hp 5.7-liter Hemi V8, while the R/T Scat Pack gains a thunderous 485-hp V8 and an optional Widebody package. The Charger SRT Hellcat shreds its tires with a 717-hp, supercharged 6.2-liter V8 (up 10 ponies over last year’s model) and gets a hood with functional air intakes, just like the Redeye model.

Fuel efficiency is not the Charger’s strong suit. Base V6 models achieve EPA-estimated ratings of 19 mpg city, 30 mpg highway and 23 mpg combined. All-wheel drive knocks those ratings down to 18/27/21. The 5.7-liter V8 is rated at 16/25/19, and the larger 6.4-liter 392-badged models are even worse at 15/24/18. Not that SRT Hellcat buyers are likely to care about efficiency, but that model’s 13 mpg city, 22 mpg highway and 16 mpg combined ratings mean it can only travel around 296 miles per 18.5-gallon tank of premium fuel. We don’t have Hellcat Redeye fuel efficiency numbers, but expect them to be terrible.

You can use the rest of this page to find more in-depth information about the 2021 Dodge Charger, including features, specs and where to find a good deal near you.

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Retail Price

$30,755 - $70,755 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

$35 - $386 Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
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Engine 3.6L V-6
MPG 19 City / 30 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 8-spd w/OD
Power 292 @ 6350 rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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