2020 Ford Explorer

2020 Explorer Photos
The 2020 Ford Explorer may not look all that different from the vehicle it replaces, but under the skin, this is a revolutionary leap for Ford's massively popular three-row family crossover. From its new rear-drive platform and powerful engines, to its spacious new cabin and abundant standard safety features, it's one of the most distinctive SUVs in its segment. We have now driven the three versions of 2020 Explorer: the volume-selling one you're most likely considering, plus the fuel-saving Explorer Hybrid and high-performance Explorer ST. Each provides eye-opening performance and impressive towing capability for a segment not known for either. It rear-drive platform also affords it a more dynamic driving experience than the norm. In terms of traditional attributes for the three-row crossover segment – passenger space, quality and value – it can't quite match the segment leaders, but it's also not too far behind them. We think it's definitely worth a look, especially if performance and driving experience are among your top priorities. What's new for 2020? The Explorer is all-new for 2020 and represents a massive improvement upon the vehicle it replaces. It remains a three-row crossover, but it now distinctly boasts a rear-wheel-drive platform. Its predecessor and virtually every competitor use a front-wheel-drive platform. The standard engine is now a turbocharged four-cylinder engine, and a V6 is only available with the high-performance ST and range-topping Platinum. Towing capacity is much higher than before. The interior gets a more stylish and function design, along with abundant infotainment and safety tech features. Second-row space is better than before as is forward visibility. What's the Explorer's interior and in-car technology like? The new Explorer offers a more stylish cabin than what you'll find in the more utilitarian Honda Pilot and Subaru Ascent, although the new Kia Telluride and Hyundai Palisade manage to exude more premium vibes. That's even the case with the wood- and leather-lined Explorer Platinum. The unremarkable quality of plastics inside the Explorer are a letdown. One potential downside is a lack of USB ports for rear passengers. While the Telluride and Palisade provide two ports in each of the rear rows, the Explorer has only one for second-row passengers and none for those in the third. We do like the wireless charging pad placed horizontally against the under-armrest bin, though, as well as the expansive covered bin that houses the two front USB ports. There's also another smartphone-friendly bin underneath the 8-inch touchscreen. How big is it? The 2020 Explorer is larger than both its predecessor and most competitors. At 198.8 inches long, only the gargantuan Chevy Traverse is larger. Thankfully, it doesn't feel that big when behind the wheel. Inside, the Explorer's dimensions indicate it has more second- and third-row legroom than all of its three-row competitors except the Traverse. However, in person we've found it to be less spacious than its dimensions would indicate, especially in the third row. While there's tons of headroom back there, it's largely the result of a low-mounted seat. So …
Full Review
The 2020 Ford Explorer may not look all that different from the vehicle it replaces, but under the skin, this is a revolutionary leap for Ford's massively popular three-row family crossover. From its new rear-drive platform and powerful engines, to its spacious new cabin and abundant standard safety features, it's one of the most distinctive SUVs in its segment. We have now driven the three versions of 2020 Explorer: the volume-selling one you're most likely considering, plus the fuel-saving Explorer Hybrid and high-performance Explorer ST. Each provides eye-opening performance and impressive towing capability for a segment not known for either. It rear-drive platform also affords it a more dynamic driving experience than the norm. In terms of traditional attributes for the three-row crossover segment – passenger space, quality and value – it can't quite match the segment leaders, but it's also not too far behind them. We think it's definitely worth a look, especially if performance and driving experience are among your top priorities. What's new for 2020? The Explorer is all-new for 2020 and represents a massive improvement upon the vehicle it replaces. It remains a three-row crossover, but it now distinctly boasts a rear-wheel-drive platform. Its predecessor and virtually every competitor use a front-wheel-drive platform. The standard engine is now a turbocharged four-cylinder engine, and a V6 is only available with the high-performance ST and range-topping Platinum. Towing capacity is much higher than before. The interior gets a more stylish and function design, along with abundant infotainment and safety tech features. Second-row space is better than before as is forward visibility. What's the Explorer's interior and in-car technology like? The new Explorer offers a more stylish cabin than what you'll find in the more utilitarian Honda Pilot and Subaru Ascent, although the new Kia Telluride and Hyundai Palisade manage to exude more premium vibes. That's even the case with the wood- and leather-lined Explorer Platinum. The unremarkable quality of plastics inside the Explorer are a letdown. One potential downside is a lack of USB ports for rear passengers. While the Telluride and Palisade provide two ports in each of the rear rows, the Explorer has only one for second-row passengers and none for those in the third. We do like the wireless charging pad placed horizontally against the under-armrest bin, though, as well as the expansive covered bin that houses the two front USB ports. There's also another smartphone-friendly bin underneath the 8-inch touchscreen. How big is it? The 2020 Explorer is larger than both its predecessor and most competitors. At 198.8 inches long, only the gargantuan Chevy Traverse is larger. Thankfully, it doesn't feel that big when behind the wheel. Inside, the Explorer's dimensions indicate it has more second- and third-row legroom than all of its three-row competitors except the Traverse. However, in person we've found it to be less spacious than its dimensions would indicate, especially in the third row. While there's tons of headroom back there, it's largely the result of a low-mounted seat. So …
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Retail Price

$36,675 - $58,250 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

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Engine 2.3LI-4
MPG 21 City / 28 Hwy
Seating 6 Passengers
Transmission 10-spd w/OD
Power 300 @ rpm
Drivetrain rear-wheel
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