2018 Buick Cascada Reviews

2018 Cascada New Car Test Drive

The following review is for a 2017 Model Year. There may be minor changes to current model you are looking at.

Introduction

The Buick Cascada has charming looks and a lot of standard equipment. It's also heavy, slow, and stiff. Cascada is the first convertible from Buick since the 1991 Reatta. 

We drove the two-door Cascada in Los Angeles, Atlanta, and the Florida Keys, and it didn't get any lighter, faster or softer. But the convertible top has a nice thick lining, and it went up and down in 17 seconds at 31 miles per hour. And the front seats were nice. We didn't take any passengers in the rear. They wouldn't have thought their seats so nice. 

The front-wheel-drive Cascada uses a turbocharged 1.6-liter engine making 200 horsepower, mated to a 6-speed automatic transmission. To keep the topless chassis from twisting and shaking, there's enough steel bracing to raise the scales to the two-ton mark, and that's just too much mass for an engine that small, even if it is turbocharged. 

First introduced in Europe as the Opel Cascada, the Buick Cascada was introduced to the U.S. as a 2016 model. 

A new 2017 Buick Cascada Sport Touring model with special trim has joined the lineup. Otherwise, Cascada carries over to the 2017 model year unchanged. 

The 2017 Cascada rates an EPA-estimated 20/27 mpg City/Highway, or 23 mpg Combined. 

Model Lineup

The 2017 Buick Cascada ($33,065) comes standard with leather upholstery, power windows and locks, eight-way power heated front seats, remote start, heated steering wheel, navigation, rearview camera, rear parking sensors, and WiFi hotspot capability. 

Cascada Premium ($36,065) adds navigation and other features. Cascada Sport Touring features special interior and exterior trim. (Prices are MSRP and do not include destination charge.). 

Lineup

The Cascada is unrelated to the Regal sedan, although there's still a family resemblance in the attractive, subtle shape with rakish profile. It was designed for Europe so the proportions are global, which is to say tidy. A deep crease starts behind the front wheels and runs back to the rear end. Not quite like the Nike swoosh in the Regal, but maybe a subtle mimic. 

Deftly drawn details include angled taillamps, winged LED running lamps, and thin chrome circling the beltline. 

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