Black Edition 2dr Rear-wheel Drive Coupe
2016 Porsche Cayman

MSRP

$59,200
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N/A
EngineEngine 2.7LH-6
MPGMPG City / Hwy
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2016 Cayman Overview

The 2016 Cayman GT4 is the sort of Porsche that purists fear would eclipse the rear-engined 911. The balance inherent in the mid-engined layout of the rigid Cayman chassis meant that it was only the right combination of horsepower and suspension away from whupping a comparable Carrera. Porsche has been very careful to keep this Cayman from doing that, despite the GT4's improvements. If you think this means the GT4 has been hobbled or hamstrung, it hasn't. Even a sopping wet track at Road Atlanta in Georgia couldn't keep us from crowning it the brash, arrogant upstart prince of the track-toy Porsches. The company got a lot right with this ultimate Cayman. To begin with, it absolutely looks the part it's supposed to play. Our tester wears searing Racing Yellow paint, that large wing looming over the rear lid is standard, and rolling stock comprises huge 20-inch wheels wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 rubber. The front fascia is altered for both airflow to the radiators and downforce, standard fare for a hot track-ready version. What's unusual is that instead of complicating the look with tacked-on contrivances (ahem, like the GTS's grille insert-within-an-insert), it's simpler, subtler, and more purposeful. Between that front splitter and the wing, expect about 220 pounds of downforce at the GT4's 183 miles per hour top clip. Ergonomically, even with these fixed-back sport bucket seats, this car is nigh-perfect. Out back, things are more complicated but no less coherent. The lip spoiler that spans the trans-tailight area grows into a little ducktail, literally overshadowed by the larger rear wing. Rear diffusers are a requisite in this class, so one is present and functional. Optimized side intakes just aft of the doors cram more air into the engine, and gain a little embossed "GT4" script. Ergonomically, even with these fixed-back sport bucket seats, this car is nigh-perfect. The slightly smaller steering wheel, perfectly sized for the application, and the smooth, precise shift action make wrangling the major inputs like an extension of your own limbs. If you want to be cynical, go ahead and call the GT4 a parts-bin car. The 3.8-liter flat-six is cribbed from the 911 Carrera S, and the front suspension, steering system, and rear brakes from the 911 GT3. Want carbon-ceramic brakes? Then you'll get GT3 parts on both axles. Our yellow GT4 is fitted with carbon-fiber bucket seats, and those happen to be 918 Spyder units – carbon ceramic brakes and Sport Chrono package round out the only other substantive options available for GT4. This isn't like some limited-production sports car using economy car switchgear. If the GT3's ridiculous multi-link rear suspension would fit, Porsche probably would have used it. It doesn't. No matter – superb Bilsteins all around and the carryover strut-type rear setup are, according to Porsche, just fine for the job. Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) will stiffen things up for track use, and a Porsche Torque Vectoring locking rear differential that uses rear inside wheel braking to …
Full Review

2016 Cayman Overview

The 2016 Cayman GT4 is the sort of Porsche that purists fear would eclipse the rear-engined 911. The balance inherent in the mid-engined layout of the rigid Cayman chassis meant that it was only the right combination of horsepower and suspension away from whupping a comparable Carrera. Porsche has been very careful to keep this Cayman from doing that, despite the GT4's improvements. If you think this means the GT4 has been hobbled or hamstrung, it hasn't. Even a sopping wet track at Road Atlanta in Georgia couldn't keep us from crowning it the brash, arrogant upstart prince of the track-toy Porsches. The company got a lot right with this ultimate Cayman. To begin with, it absolutely looks the part it's supposed to play. Our tester wears searing Racing Yellow paint, that large wing looming over the rear lid is standard, and rolling stock comprises huge 20-inch wheels wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 rubber. The front fascia is altered for both airflow to the radiators and downforce, standard fare for a hot track-ready version. What's unusual is that instead of complicating the look with tacked-on contrivances (ahem, like the GTS's grille insert-within-an-insert), it's simpler, subtler, and more purposeful. Between that front splitter and the wing, expect about 220 pounds of downforce at the GT4's 183 miles per hour top clip. Ergonomically, even with these fixed-back sport bucket seats, this car is nigh-perfect. Out back, things are more complicated but no less coherent. The lip spoiler that spans the trans-tailight area grows into a little ducktail, literally overshadowed by the larger rear wing. Rear diffusers are a requisite in this class, so one is present and functional. Optimized side intakes just aft of the doors cram more air into the engine, and gain a little embossed "GT4" script. Ergonomically, even with these fixed-back sport bucket seats, this car is nigh-perfect. The slightly smaller steering wheel, perfectly sized for the application, and the smooth, precise shift action make wrangling the major inputs like an extension of your own limbs. If you want to be cynical, go ahead and call the GT4 a parts-bin car. The 3.8-liter flat-six is cribbed from the 911 Carrera S, and the front suspension, steering system, and rear brakes from the 911 GT3. Want carbon-ceramic brakes? Then you'll get GT3 parts on both axles. Our yellow GT4 is fitted with carbon-fiber bucket seats, and those happen to be 918 Spyder units – carbon ceramic brakes and Sport Chrono package round out the only other substantive options available for GT4. This isn't like some limited-production sports car using economy car switchgear. If the GT3's ridiculous multi-link rear suspension would fit, Porsche probably would have used it. It doesn't. No matter – superb Bilsteins all around and the carryover strut-type rear setup are, according to Porsche, just fine for the job. Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) will stiffen things up for track use, and a Porsche Torque Vectoring locking rear differential that uses rear inside wheel braking to …Hide Full Review