GSR 4dr Sedan
2013 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution

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$34,695
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EngineEngine 2.0LI-4
MPGMPG 17 City / 23 Hwy
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2013 Lancer Evolution Overview

Quick Corners And Long Goodbyes Editor's Note: While driving the Mitsubishi Evolution in the slush and snow of a Michigan winter is a fine enterprise, photographing it in such conditions is usually not fruitful. That's why you'll notice a slight disparity between our wintry text and sunny, Arizona-based photographs of the subject car. Rest assured, both the review vehicle and the photo car are of the same basic Evo GSR flavor. It was a dreary, gray, barely sufferable winter morning in Ann Arbor, MI. Temperatures hovering just over 30 degrees allowed for snow or rain or some combination thereof at a moment's notice, and the thickly clouded sky hinted at dark secrets while promising nothing. I've never been a rally driver but I couldn't help but feel that this murky, imprecise day was good winter rally weather. I'll admit: I don't usually wake up and look out the window to judge which kind of racing would be best just then, but the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution X GSR delivered to my house the day before was coloring the mood of the hour; most of my thoughts ran to where I was going to drive it, when, and how fast. The Evo sitting in my crumbling suburban driveway sounded like a rifle shot when I first turned the engine over at 5:00 AM – exhaust meted out in cranky blats every time I tiptoed on the throttle. I was up early on a winter's Saturday for a few reasons, number one being that I'm oddly inhabited by the insomniac spirit of an octogenarian for a 34-year-old, and I wake up even if I don't have to. Number two was all about the Mitsubishi. This is a brutal, crashing, whining, visceral, explosive mean little kidney-punch of a car. This is a brutal, crashing, whining, visceral, explosive mean little kidney-punch of a car. Let's not forget that. In 2007 when the Evo X made its debut, there was enough rhetoric from the media about the car being "softer" than its Evo IX predecessor that sometimes I think people who haven't driven one still believe that it is some tame thing that happens to be pretty quick. Over the course of the last few years, it's very possible that I've driven the Evo more – more trims and individual test cars, in more driving situations, if not more miles – than any other single vehicle. In part, that's because I'm a lucky sonnabitch who's had the access and opportunity to drive quite a lot of great cars from the last decade. But also because, despite its now-advanced age, the Evo can't help but be a car that readers and reviewers want more time with, more video of and more comparisons against. It's a singular automotive thing, as well as a very good-to-drive, very fast thing. The Evo X is also – and this was critical on the morning in question – a car that is quite possibly never going to be the same again, when …
Full Review

2013 Lancer Evolution Overview

Quick Corners And Long Goodbyes Editor's Note: While driving the Mitsubishi Evolution in the slush and snow of a Michigan winter is a fine enterprise, photographing it in such conditions is usually not fruitful. That's why you'll notice a slight disparity between our wintry text and sunny, Arizona-based photographs of the subject car. Rest assured, both the review vehicle and the photo car are of the same basic Evo GSR flavor. It was a dreary, gray, barely sufferable winter morning in Ann Arbor, MI. Temperatures hovering just over 30 degrees allowed for snow or rain or some combination thereof at a moment's notice, and the thickly clouded sky hinted at dark secrets while promising nothing. I've never been a rally driver but I couldn't help but feel that this murky, imprecise day was good winter rally weather. I'll admit: I don't usually wake up and look out the window to judge which kind of racing would be best just then, but the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution X GSR delivered to my house the day before was coloring the mood of the hour; most of my thoughts ran to where I was going to drive it, when, and how fast. The Evo sitting in my crumbling suburban driveway sounded like a rifle shot when I first turned the engine over at 5:00 AM – exhaust meted out in cranky blats every time I tiptoed on the throttle. I was up early on a winter's Saturday for a few reasons, number one being that I'm oddly inhabited by the insomniac spirit of an octogenarian for a 34-year-old, and I wake up even if I don't have to. Number two was all about the Mitsubishi. This is a brutal, crashing, whining, visceral, explosive mean little kidney-punch of a car. This is a brutal, crashing, whining, visceral, explosive mean little kidney-punch of a car. Let's not forget that. In 2007 when the Evo X made its debut, there was enough rhetoric from the media about the car being "softer" than its Evo IX predecessor that sometimes I think people who haven't driven one still believe that it is some tame thing that happens to be pretty quick. Over the course of the last few years, it's very possible that I've driven the Evo more – more trims and individual test cars, in more driving situations, if not more miles – than any other single vehicle. In part, that's because I'm a lucky sonnabitch who's had the access and opportunity to drive quite a lot of great cars from the last decade. But also because, despite its now-advanced age, the Evo can't help but be a car that readers and reviewers want more time with, more video of and more comparisons against. It's a singular automotive thing, as well as a very good-to-drive, very fast thing. The Evo X is also – and this was critical on the morning in question – a car that is quite possibly never going to be the same again, when …Hide Full Review