2.0T 4dr All-wheel Drive quattro
2009 Audi A3

2009 A3 Photos
2010 Audi A3 TDI – Click above for high-res image gallery Audi started its big push for clean diesel here in the U.S. market this spring when its big Q7 TDI finally went on sale. While the Q7 TDI is one of the most fuel efficient seven-passenger SUVs available anywhere, it's only the beginning for Audi. Assuming that Americans start taking a shine to hot oil, Audi is likely to introduce a whole series of Rudi D's disciples here. So far, however, only one has been announced in addition to the Q7, the compact A3 hatchback. The A3 is the entry-level model for the four-ringed brand here in the U.S. Until now, it has only been sold with a choice of a 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder or 3.2-liter V6 engines running on gasoline. At the Detroit Auto Show, Audi announced that the A3 TDI would go on sale late this year. While the A3 TDI isn't yet available, one was made available to us for five days during a recent trip to Southern California. Find out what it was like after the jump. %Gallery-78851% Photos Copyright ©2009 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc. Until the new A1 and possibly the A2 arrive in the next couple of years, Audi's global lineup is anchored by the A3. Like the TT coupe and roadster, the A3 shares much of its underpinnings with corporate siblings from the Volkswagen side of the family – specifically, the Golf and Jetta. Thus, the A3 is a C-segment car with a transverse-mounted engine and front- or optional Quattro all-wheel drive. Europeans can get an A3 with either two- or four-passenger entry portals plus a tailgate. We only get the five-door variant here in the U.S. The A3 also rides on the same 101.5-inch wheelbase as the Golf and Jetta, though it is just over three inches longer than the Golf/Rabbit and a little over a foot shorter than the Jetta. Where it really differs is being nine inches (the original dimensional comparison erred in listing the span of the outside mirrors for the A3) marginally wider and two inches closer to the ground. Combined with the somewhat overbearing Audi family grille, the A3 has a stockier, more athletic appearance than the VWs. Audi has never been particularly fond of the term station wagon, or apparently hatchback, either. Audi wagons have long worn the Avant appellation. Technically, Audi does not call the A3 a hatchback or a wagon, but rather a Sportback. Whatever it's called, the A3 is a handsome little car that offers a healthy dose of utility, as well. Americans have strange attitudes when it comes to vehicles. Until gas prices spiked, we had no issue buying millions of SUVs with tailgates that were little more than high-riding, glorified wagons. But when it comes to cars, for some reason we feel the need for a trunk to have a more upscale appearance. As a result, the next generation A3 is expected to sprout just such a rear …
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2010 Audi A3 TDI – Click above for high-res image gallery Audi started its big push for clean diesel here in the U.S. market this spring when its big Q7 TDI finally went on sale. While the Q7 TDI is one of the most fuel efficient seven-passenger SUVs available anywhere, it's only the beginning for Audi. Assuming that Americans start taking a shine to hot oil, Audi is likely to introduce a whole series of Rudi D's disciples here. So far, however, only one has been announced in addition to the Q7, the compact A3 hatchback. The A3 is the entry-level model for the four-ringed brand here in the U.S. Until now, it has only been sold with a choice of a 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder or 3.2-liter V6 engines running on gasoline. At the Detroit Auto Show, Audi announced that the A3 TDI would go on sale late this year. While the A3 TDI isn't yet available, one was made available to us for five days during a recent trip to Southern California. Find out what it was like after the jump. %Gallery-78851% Photos Copyright ©2009 Drew Phillips / Weblogs, Inc. Until the new A1 and possibly the A2 arrive in the next couple of years, Audi's global lineup is anchored by the A3. Like the TT coupe and roadster, the A3 shares much of its underpinnings with corporate siblings from the Volkswagen side of the family – specifically, the Golf and Jetta. Thus, the A3 is a C-segment car with a transverse-mounted engine and front- or optional Quattro all-wheel drive. Europeans can get an A3 with either two- or four-passenger entry portals plus a tailgate. We only get the five-door variant here in the U.S. The A3 also rides on the same 101.5-inch wheelbase as the Golf and Jetta, though it is just over three inches longer than the Golf/Rabbit and a little over a foot shorter than the Jetta. Where it really differs is being nine inches (the original dimensional comparison erred in listing the span of the outside mirrors for the A3) marginally wider and two inches closer to the ground. Combined with the somewhat overbearing Audi family grille, the A3 has a stockier, more athletic appearance than the VWs. Audi has never been particularly fond of the term station wagon, or apparently hatchback, either. Audi wagons have long worn the Avant appellation. Technically, Audi does not call the A3 a hatchback or a wagon, but rather a Sportback. Whatever it's called, the A3 is a handsome little car that offers a healthy dose of utility, as well. Americans have strange attitudes when it comes to vehicles. Until gas prices spiked, we had no issue buying millions of SUVs with tailgates that were little more than high-riding, glorified wagons. But when it comes to cars, for some reason we feel the need for a trunk to have a more upscale appearance. As a result, the next generation A3 is expected to sprout just such a rear …
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Retail Price

$30,500 MSRP / Window Sticker Price

Smart Buy Price

NA Nat'l avg. savings off MSRP
Engine 2.0LI-4
MPG 21 City / 28 Hwy
Seating 5 Passengers
Transmission 6-spd auto-shift man w/OD
Power 200 @ 5100 rpm
Drivetrain quattro all wheel
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