• Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
  • Image Credit: Ben Wojdyla
Nissan Z-car fans, it's time to get excited. Finally. Like, how long has it been since a new Z? Eight years. Car and Driver reports that we'll finally get our first look at the 370Z's successor at this year's Tokyo auto show. The magazine reports Nissan will show a concept for the car that will have a grille inspired by the GT-R and other recent Nissan models, and the production model will be based on the Infiniti Q60 platform.

If this report proves to be true, it means Nissan decided not to make the Z more like the original 240. Nissan design chief Shiro Nakamura suggested a more affordable, smaller sports car concept was under consideration back in 2015.

In addition to the Q60's platform, C/D says the production Z will share both of the Q60's twin-turbo 3.0-liter V-6 engines. The entry-level version makes 300 horsepower, while the Red Sport's makes 400. The magazine also says that these conventional engines will be joined by a hybrid variant good for 500 horsepower. Auto Express echoes the powertrain line-up with one exception. Instead of the Q60's base twin-turbo V-6, Auto Express suggests the Z would use a 304-horsepower naturally aspirated V6.

This selection of powertrains will position the new Z well against the mid- to high-performance versions of similarly sized sports cars such as the Mustang and Camaro. Although Car and Driver's expected price tag of $30,000 to $50,000 may push it into the realm of more premium machines. If the new Z does offer all three of these engines, it will also be the first to have a number of powertrain options since the Z32 300ZX of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Speaking of which, it will also be interesting to see if Nissan revives the 300Z or 300ZX name to reflect the displacement of these engines.

Car and Driver further mentions that these engines will use dual-clutch transmissions. While nothing is said about the inclusion of manual transmissions, we think it would be foolish not to offer something with a clutch pedal. Whatever the offerings are, we should know sometime in the next two years, since the magazine expects the production model to be released before 2019.

Related Video:

Share This Photo X