Apple unveiled its iOS in the Car operating system during the 2013 Worldwide Developers Conference last June. During the keynote, it showed off how iOS 7 could be adapted to work as an automotive infotainment system. Since then, Apple has been mum on the subject, but the first demo of the new OS has leaked out from developer Steven Troughton-Smith.

Troughton-Smith's demo shows how users can input navigation destinations either from their iPhone or touching the screen itself. A home button allows users to switch between multiple apps or go back to the main screen.

During the WWDC keynote, Apple also promised that iOS in the Car users would be able to use voice commands to make calls, set navigation destinations and select music. Troughton-Smith's demo lacks audio, so it isn't clear whether these features are functional yet. Denis Stas, another iOS developer, posted a screenshot of iOS in the Car emulation in the beta for iOS7.1. This updated version has a more unified look than Troughton-Smith's demo and shows that Apple is continuing to work on the user interface.

iOS in the Car is Apple's attempt to supplant automakers' own infotainment systems with its own unified operating system. For drivers, it means being able to use the same system no matter what car they are in. For Apple, it means more consumers who want to use its devices. Scroll down to view Apple's concept for the future of navigation and infotainment.


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  • 18 Comments
      R S
      • 1 Year Ago
      I dont know why any manufacturer would alienate half the comsumers with Droids. Seems like if you dont offer a Droid version, you will lose a sale. I like Android products and if I looked at a car and it favored Apple products, I would look elsewhere.
        mikeybyte1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @R S
        Maybe because Google has not released an in-car operating system interface? Kind of hard to do that when it doesn't exist yet.
      RSS007
      • 1 Year Ago
      I hope this doesn't take off.
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
      mikeybyte1
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think this is where the industry is headed. As much as manufacturers love charging $1000 for navigation, most consumers are fed up with spending that much to have a maps app that is outdated in a year or two. Then the manufacturer wants to charge them more to update it? That was a nice business plan before the proliferation of smart phones. I have noticed in car navigation is rarely a standalone option these days. They now bury it in a tech package with a ton of other stuff. Furthermore, this type of integration will soon become a draw for the ever coveted younger generation of buyers. If they can bring their own phone and get a bunch of cool features integrated they will buy that model instead of another brand that doesn't offer it. And fan boys really need to just drop it with the "oh if it's integrated to Apple and not Google then I won't buy that car! WAAAHHHHHH!!!" Cry cry to mommy. If you are too dumb to understand that a) Apple is leading the way here and it's only a matter of time before Google and Microsoft copy them, and b) this is optional tech meaning it's optional and the word optional means you don't have to use it if you don't want to, then you probably shouldn't be operating or buying a car in the first place. Back to your room in mom's basement kids.
      audisp0rta4
      • 1 Year Ago
      Finally... I just want to install a DD screen in my dash that acts as a redundant display/control panel for my iPhone. I don't know why that's been so hard to ask for?!
        HayesData
        • 1 Year Ago
        @audisp0rta4
        The reason is quite simple, Apple doesn't just put out products that are "good enough". Every time they get into a new product segment they distill it to the core and then build the experience they believe is best. A mirrored display with touch input while nice creates a lot of new use cases in an automotive environment. For example; how would you handle applications that require screen rotation? What is the optimum font size for a display sitting 3-4 feet away? How do you handle accidental swipes because the car is moving? Considerations like that are what will make Apple step back figure out how they can best address the design and user experience. Only once they are satisfied with a solution will they make any announcements or show the product.
        mikeybyte1
        • 1 Year Ago
        @audisp0rta4
        Because they don't want people to have the ability to play Angry Birds on the car dashboard while they drive.
      Cubanaso
      • 1 Year Ago
      I like this and it's about time!!! Honestly, NAV from car companies are as good as they ever where...back in the 90's lol
      Steve
      • 1 Year Ago
      I don't like it
      Richel Jones
      • 1 Year Ago
      Like you can get an iOS in the car , you can use your smart phone for the purchase of new and used branded cars from an online car showroom The Torque . Log in to www.thetorque.in for more details .
      Brett Padgett
      • 1 Year Ago
      I see the industry heading this way as well and I'm an Apple guy but they better improve their "Maps" app as it just doesn't live up to Google Maps yet. Data plans will have to be expanded and/or included "free" for a period of time just like satellite radio is now.
      Nicholas Fogelson
      • 1 Year Ago
      I think what will happen is that auto manufacturers will be against this, but that it will be a tremendous boon for third party installers and manufacturers. As soon as this is out forever more I will be installing an aftermarket stereo with 2 grand in great speakers and amps rather than the three thousand dollar upgraded stereo the manufacturer wants to sell me.
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