If you miss drive-ins, we've got it all worked out for you. How you recreate the experience is up to you. The simplest method would be to just plop your laptop on the hood, but the screen is a bit small for that, and the sound would be worse than those little speakers that clipped on the windows. Kicking the video out via HDMI to an LCD or plasma would be better, you could even mount the screen in the garage! We don't recommend idling the motor, though.

Most drive-ins now have either been turned into bumper crops of McMansions, or stand barren. It's an eerie sight to see orderly rows of 1-meter high poles standing at attention in a sea of failing asphalt, vegetation pushing through the cracks, detritus blowing like tumbleweeds across the sun-bleached decay. Back in the day, double-features of spooky movies were de-rigeur at drive-ins, it's ironic now that the drive-in would be a perfect setting for one of those creepy films. Details of what's on the marquee are after the jump, and it's double-feature night (Well, day, really. -Ed.) at the Autoblog Drive-In, so be sure to be back from the snack bar for Part 2, coming soon.

We stumbled across a treasure trove of old horror films, commercials, and interstitial inducements to visit the snack bar. Brightcove user 13 Shades of Black has done us all a great service by putting all these classics online, so we can recapture the life that once milled about the ubiquitous cinderblock and blacktop funfairs, people flitting to and fro like blood cells.

Tonight's double feature starts with Bloodlust, a 1961 adaptation of The Most Dangerous Game, notably featuring Robert Reed (ahem, Mr. Brady!). Roger Corman's The Terror is the second feature, pairing Boris Karloff with Jack Nicholson in a 1963 tale of imprisonment and misery, set in Napoleonic France. It wouldn't be a drive-in without ads and PSAs before the film, so click these in order for the full experience, and keep an eye out for intermission and part 2.





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